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December 2017

Bibliothecae historicae libri VI, Diodorus Siculus

 

756G

756G Diodorus Siculus fl. 44 B.C.               Bibliothecae historicae libri VI   [a Poggio Florentino in latinum traductus]

[Paris] : [Denis Roce] Venundantur in vico sancti Iacobi sub signo Ensis. (1505-08)                                               $1.900

Approximate date of publication from Moreau, B. Inventaire chronologique des éditions parisiennes v. 1, p. 274 Printer’s mark of Jehan Barbier on title page.

 

Octavo inches alternate 8’s and 4’s   inches , a-v8·4 x6 y4            This copy is bound in full 18th century calf rebacked gilt spine.DSC_0107

Diodorus Siculus is the author of the ‘Bibliotheke’ or ‘Library,’ a universal history from mythological times to 60 B.C. Only fifteen of the original forty books survive fully (books one through five; eleven through twenty); the others are preserved in fragments.

ON December 6th, 2008 by Roger Pearse
Yesterday I mentioned N. G. Wilson’s statement that a complete copy of Diodorus Siculus existed in 1453. This led me to look again at his two books on how ancient Greek literature came to the west. These excellent volumes are Scholars of Byzantium, which discusses the fate of that literature in the Eastern Roman Empire from 400-1453; and From Byzantium to Italy, which talks about how it then got to Italy.
The statement about Diodorus is on the last page of text of the latter, p. 162, and note 4 on it, which tells us that Constantine Lascaris saw that volume in the imperial palace, PG 161:198. This is the last volume of the PG, in fact; containing material by Bessarion, George Trapezuntinus, Constantine Lascaris, Theodore of Gaza, and Andronicus Callistus.
The work by Constantine Lascaris is De scriptoribus Graecis Patria Siculis – Greek writers from Sicily – is in Latin, addressed to a renaissance ruler of Sicily, and commences on col. 195. Various writers are listed. I transcribe the whole entry on Diodorus from an unfortunately indistinct image:
9. Diodorus Siculus Argyrensis, historicus praestantissimus, qui sub Tiberio militavit. Historiam composuit libris quadraginta, quam Bibliothecam vocavit: de antiquitate Aegyptiorum, de Sicilia et aliis insulis, de bello Trojano, de gestis Alexandri et Romanorum usque ad suam artatem (?), quorum sex a Poggio Florentino traducti circumferuntur. Reliqui vix inventiuntur. Ego autem omnes ejus libros vidi in bibliotheca imperatoris C[onstantino]politani.
That’s plain enough:
9. Diodorus Siculus, of Argyra, a preeminent historian, who lived in the time of Tiberius. He composed a History in 40 books, which he called The Library: on the antiquities of the Egyptians, on Sicily and the other islands, on the Trojan war, the deeds of Alexander and the Romans, down to his own times, of which six translated by Poggio the Florentine are going around. The rest are hard to find. But I myself have seen all of his books in the imperial library in Constantinople.
We can take Lascaris at his word, I think. Constantine Lascaris was a nobleman of the empire who fled the city with others in 1454 and went to Italy. After staying in Milan and Rome he received an invitation from Ferdinand I to go to Naples, and eventually fixed himself in Messina in Sicily, where he taught Greek language and literature. His library ended up in the Escorial in Spain.

What we do have of Diodorus concentrates on Greece and his homeland of Sicily, until the First Punic War, when his sources for Rome become fuller. The ‘Bibliotheke’ is the most extensively preserved history by a Greek author from antiquity. For the period from the accession of Philip II of Macedon to the battle of Ipsus, when the text becomes fragmentary, it is fundamental; and it is the essential source for classical Sicilian history and the Sicilian slave rebellion of the second century B.C. For many individual events throughout Graeco-Roman history, the ‘Bibliotheke’ also sheds important light. Diodorus probably visited Egypt circa 60-56 B.C., where he began researching his history. By 56, he may have settled in Rome, completing the ‘Bibliotheke’ there around 30. He read Latin and had access to written materials in Rome. Books one through six include the geography and ethnography of the inhabited world, and its mythology and paradoxology prior to the Trojan war. Of special significance are the description of Egypt in book one; the discussion of India in book two; passages from the works of Agatharchides in book three; and the highly fragmentary Euhemeran material in book six.” (OCD)

art112

 

Realistically speaking, he was not the greatest of historians. His work often combined fact and fancy in a confusing manner. Even so, Diodorus Siculus (or Diodoros Siculos to his Greek contemporaries), left a wealth of writings which have added to our knowledge of Sicily and the eastern Mediterranean during the “Roman” age. His work has been characterised as uncritical but we are reasonably certain of some details. He was born during the first century BC at Agyrium, in central-eastern Sicily, of a Greek family, and spent some time in Rome, Greece and Egypt, visiting the last around 60 BC. The most recent historical event mentioned in his works occurs in 21 BC. His Bibliotheca Historica (“Historical Library”) includes numerous surviving texts, some fairly reliable –particularly those “borrowed” from authors such as Apollodorus and Timaeus. The problem, as we have implied, is that Diodorus does not always differentiate historical events from historical legend, even though some historians of his era managed to do so. It’s one thing to repeat that the mythical hero Heracles (Hercules) visited Agyrium (Agyrium was east of Enna toward Mount Etna), but quite another to attribute actual events to people who could not possibly have been present to participate in them.DSC_0108

In considering his monumental work, the first portion deals with history until the destruction of Troy, the second segment with the death of Alexander, and the third, turning an eye westward, with the period leading up to Julius Caesar’s conquest of Gaul. Of the forty books, volumes 1 through 5 exist, and volumes 11 through 20 (inclusive) have also been preserved. Only those texts recounting events during the author’s own lifetime may be said to be truly original. It is thought that Hieronymus of Cardia and, for earlier periods, Ephorus, were the sources of his knowledge of Greek history.

Certain passages of Diodorus’ “missing” books are cited by other authors, such as Photius. That Diodorus’ work itself has preserved the earlier writings of several historians is important. His “mythic” treatment of Egyptian, Ethiopian, Assyrian and Persian history is relevant to studies of these civilizations. However, he did not necessarily travel to every place he wrote about. His description of Mesopotamia’s legendary Babylonian rulers is probably based on those of Ctesias.

 

It seems tat many book sellers were marketing this very printing book in paris about the same time, with different devices, J. Barbier seems to have taken Roce’s device about 1508.

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Goff D215? ; Moreau I 274: 63; Renouard, Imprimeurs III 128 and I, 1508, 63; Renouard, 1005 (mark of D. Roce) Pell 4264; BMC(Fr) p.135

 

The First English Essayist Cornwallyes NOT Bacon

815F      Sir William Cornwallis d. 1631

Essayes, by Sr William Cornwallyes, the younger, knight. Newlie corrected.

London: Printed by Thomas Harper for I. M., 1632           $3,500

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Octavo  5 ½ 5 x 3 ½. [A3] missing A1 blank, B-Z8, Aa-Oo8. This collation is consistent with Pforzheimer catalogue.  Engraved title page. by T. Cecill containing two portraits supposed to represent Sir William and his father, Sir Charles Cornwallis.

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Third edition of the “Essayes”, Parts I and II; second edition of the “Discourses.”  DSC_0242                               This is a nice copy bound in full contemporary calf rebacked. The spine has gilt label
Overall, the leaves are in excellent condition, this copy has ample margins, not often found in this work.

 

This book is consists of three seperate works each with a seperate title page but published together. The first “Essayes” is followed by “ Essayes the Second Part” and “Discourses upon Seneca the Tragedian”.
While some state that Cornwallis “was a friend of Ben Jonson, and employed him to write ‘Penates, or a Private Entertainment for the King and Queen,’ on their visit to his house at Highgate on Mayday, 1604. This is not the author of the essays rather it is his Uncle.

His essays are in imitation of Montaigne, but lack the sprightliness of the French author. Yet they are true essays and therefor differ from Bacon, whose ‘Essays” are a collection of aphorisms. They cover such topics as ambition, resolution, youth, essays and books, and humility. DSC_0239 Cornwallis spent his life in studious retirement. The “Essayes” is also a work of considerable Shakespearean interest – it is “so rare that a writer in ‘Shakespeare’s Centurie of Prayse,’ could not find a copy”. This work is also referred to at length by Hunter in his “New Illustrations” of the Tempest, who argues that as Florio’s translation of Montaigne had undoubtedly been seen by Cornwallis before 1600, so too, it was probably seen and used by Shakespeare in his composition of the Tempest (see Hunter, Joseph “New Illustrations of the life, studies, and writings of Shakespeare” London: J.B. Nichols and son 1845).

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STC 5781; Arber IV, 92; Huntington C.L., 90; Grolier Club W-P I, 182; Hoe Catalogue I (1903) 322. Hazlitt I, 101.

See also : Encyclopedia of the Essay edited by Tracy Chevalier  http://www.am41SU533HULL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_azon.com/Encyclopedia-Essay-Tracy-Chevalier/dp/1884964303/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1454524110&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=encycloedia+of+the+essay

 

Franciscans

DSC_0285922G         Bernardinus     deBusti, (  (1450-1513)

Rosarium sermonum predicabilium per quadragesima[m] & totu[m] anni circulum: editum per vite venerabilis religiosum fratre[s] Bernardinu[m] de Busti ordinis sancti Francisci de obseruantia predicatore[m] doctissimu[m]. Pars prima Rosariu[m] (additions by Illuminatus Novariensis and Samuel Cassinensis)

Venice : Georgius Arrivabenus, 1498 & 1498    $Sold

Octavo   a-z8, [&]8, [con]8, [rum]8, aa-ff8, gg4 (gg4 is blank) (complete).                      Some rubricating and a few annotations. In two parts, dated: I) 31 May 1498; II) 16 Aug. 1498
s-l1600-4Incipit Rosarium sermonum predicabilium per quadragesima[m] & totu[m] anni circulum: editum per vite venerabilis religiosum fratre[s] Bernardinu[m] de Busti ordinis sancti Francisci de obseruantia predicatore[m] doctissimu[m].

s-l1600-3This copy is bound in its original binding of full blind stamped pigskin over wooden s-l1600-6boards with both clasps        His 16th sermon is important for the history of witchcraft.  Unlike the Dominican demonologists, de Busti treated witchcraft (for instance in his 16th sermon) as a form of idolatry and superstition, and as such as a violation of the first commandment, a kind of improper worship. While being harmful magic it was not seen as a stereotypical diabolical conspiracy. However Busti described a woman who practiced magic and renounced the catholic faith as ‘stria’, a species of female witches that had the credit of getting to the insides of men, and thus devouring them.  Sermon 16 of Bernardino Busti’s Rosarium Sermonum,  proves a rich source for the developing concept of witchcraft at the close of the fifteenth century.  The sermon elaborates on ways in which it is possible to sin against the proscription of idolatry in the first commandment.  Busti was particularly worried about three elements of idolatry common to depictions of witches: demonic involvement, ritualistic behaviors, and negation of the principles of Christianity.  By describing maleficae et maladictae feminae who renounced the Catholic faith, he contributed to ratification of the stereotype of the striga in the early modern period.

Benardino Busti and other Franciscan writers arranged the superstitious practices they wrote to oppose.  One of these was outright idolatry. Others included forms of divination, observance of omens, interpretation of dreams, use of amulets, and more elite practices such as necromancy and the ars notoria.  Also included among superstitious practices was maleficium, which could be translated as witchcraft.  Conti  (see below) argues, however, that Busti and other Franciscan writers treated maleficium still mainly as simple harmful magic, not as a practice inevitably linked to news, more terrible stereotypes of diabolical, conspiratorial witchcraft emerging in the fifteenth century. They addressed those notions too, however, and it is to witchcraft address nocturnal travel to a witches’ sabbath, the ludus Dianae, or when they describe witches’ supposed belief in their own ability to transform (or be transformed by demons) into cats.

Grounded firmly in the tradition of the canon Episcopi, observant Franciscans regarded both of these as entirely illusory–merely the deception of demons worked on the feeble minds of foolish women, and sometimes men. They were by no means unaware of other developing theories of witchcraft, however. They incorporated the notion of witches’ traveling to the ludus Dianae on rods anointed with hideous unguents, whereas the canon Episcopi refers only to women riding on animals in the train of the supposed goddess Diana, actually a demon in disguise.  Here they reflected a stereotype developing since the early fifteenth century in regions around the western Alps….they began in some ways to conflate the ludus Dianae tradition with the separate ludus bariloti, that envisioned malefactors magically entering locked houses, to feast, drink from wine barrels, and commit other indecent revelries. This ludus, Franciscan authorities were willing to posit, might reflect real, physical action, but they never allowed that to affect their judgment that travel with Diana was always completely illusory.

see. F. Conti, Witchcraft, Superstition, and Observant Franciscan Preachers
Pastoral Approach and Intellectual Debate in Renaissance Milan 2015

ch “Preachers and Confessors against “Superstitions”: Bernardino Busti and Sermon 16 of His Rosarium Sermonum” 2011
Goff B1336;
Goff B1336; H 4163*;BM 15th cent.,; V, p. 387 (IA. 22572)

 

 

Carcano

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Sermonarium de poenitentia per adventum et per quadragesimam fratris Michaelis Mediolanensis.  Venice : Georgius Arrivabenus, 28 Sept. 1496    $9,000

DSC_0099  a-z8 [et]8 [con]8 [rum]8 A-E8 F10.
Bound in early blind-tooled pigskin over wooden boards, with one engraved brass clasp on alum-tawed skin strap secured at fore-edge of lower board, two engraved brass catches at fore-edge of upper board.

DSC_0102DSC_0103    One of the great Franciscan preachers of the 15th-century, these are 92 sermons for Advent and Lent, that amount to a systematic treatment of penitence. Michael’s preaching was much admired by Bernardino da Feltre, who called him ‘alter sanctus apostolus Paulus et Christi Tuba’.

Quadragesimale seu sermonarium de penitentia duplicatum per aduentu[m] videlicet & quadragesima[m] a venerabili viro fratre Michaele Mediolanensi ordinis fratrum minorum de obseruantia editum: qui tum sanctimonia vite, tu[m] ferue[n]tissima verbi dei p[re]dicatione a deo inumeris meruit corruscare miraculis felici numine explicitum est. Impressu[m] Venetijs optimaq[ue] castigatione eme[n]datu[m]: per Georgiu[m] de Arriuabenis Ma[n]tuanum. Anno d[omi]ni .M.cccclxxxxvj. die .xxviij. Septembris./

 

 

ReferencesGoff C197; H 4507*; Parguez 301; Richard 160; Polain(B) 1009; IBE 1484; IGI 2521; IBP 1435; Kotvan 353; Sajó-Soltész 929; Gspan-Badali  172; Madsen 1044; Martín Abad C-54; Günt(L) 3107; Voull(Trier) 2066; Voull(B) 4127,5; Hubay(Augsburg) 529; Sack(Freiburg) 937; Hummel-Wilhelmi 434; Kind(Göttingen) 2065; Borm 701; Döring-Fuchs C-56; Walsh 2140; Oates 1936; Pr 4932; BMC V 386; BSB-Ink C-146; GW 6132  (HEHL
HarvCL
LC
Library of Congress,
St Bonaventure Univ., Franciscan Institute
Univ. of Kentucky,
Univ. of Minnesota

 

946G  formerly attributed to Bonaventura  Nicolaus de Hanapis (1225-1291)

           Exempla Sacrae Scriptae ex utroque Testamento collecta. (Biblia pauperum;) Virtutum vitiorumque exempla

 

Imp[re]ssioniq[ue] Venetijs deditu[m] : Impe[n]sis Iohannis de Colonia socijq[ue] ei[us] Ioha[n]nis Manthen de Gherretzem,  before 1477 (The Paris BN copy was bought at Avignon on 14 August 1477)    $7500         Folio          π2 a-m8 n4./   70 ff n. ch. sign. a-e8, f6, g;a-b8, c6, d8 ; in-4, 219 mm   Title from incipit of Breviloquium (leaf [1st]a2r)./ Includes “Biblia Pauperum” attributed to St. Bonaventure, which is a shortened version of a text by Nicolas de Hannapes, Virtutum vitiorumque exempla, more generally called “Exempla sacrae Scripturae”. Cf. Gutenberg Jahrbuch 1936, p. 61-62./ Each work has separate signatures./ Imprint from colophon (leaf [2nd]d8r)./ Signatures: a-e8, f6, g8, [2nd]a-[2nd]b8, [2nd]c6, [2nd]d8./ {Title from the opening line of the Prologus, leaf a2./ The Biblia pauperum (leaves 2a1-2d8) is now usually attributed to Nicolas de Hannapes. Cf. BM 15th cent., GW./ Imprint from colophon./ Signatures: a-c8 f6 g8 2a-2b8 2c6 2d8./ }                      Back carton, brown calf case of the sec. XVIII with elegant decoration imprinted in gold, with title and date of the work on the front plate. Ancient note of possession to a final glance.      This is the second part only this tract   consists of one of several versions of a text going back to the Virtutum vitiorumque exempla of Nicolaus Hanapus, and generally entitled Exempla sacrae scripturae. The title ‘Biblia pauperum’ and the ascription to St. Bonaventure are both incorrect”.  (V. Scholderer in Gb Jb 1936 pp.61-62, reprinted in Fifty Essays (Amsterdam, 1966) pp.140-41: Version E)
Rather than a ‘Pauper’s bible’ this book is in actuality a “religious exempla” (cautionary stories used to aid preaching)   The book presents thousands of examples drawn exclusively from the Bible that enable preachers to illustrate their teaching on virtues and vices and to help the faithful to behave Christianly in public and private life, The moment of death. It was printed for the first time in Venice in 1477 and attributed to St. Bonaventure . It is frequently reissued under various titles. For example, Summa virtutum and viciorum (Cologne 1544, and Paris 1548), Virtutum vitiorumque exempla ex universo divinae scripture promptuario desumta , Flores biblici , Exempla biblica (Augsburg, 1726), or simply as the ‘Bible of the Poor’ , Probably because these narratives were easily understood, and because the publishers had arranged them in alphabetical order               Goff B858; BMC XII 16; Walsh 1701
(US copies :Folger Shakespeare Library
HEHL (var)
HarvCL
Indiana Univ. (Biblia pauperum only)
LC
Southern Methodist Univ., Bridwell Library
The Newberry Library
Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library (-)
Vassar College

 

957G         Richard     Mediavilla [Middleton],      d. 1302/3 Commentum super quartem Sententarium.DSC_0285
.  Venice: Christophorus Arnoldus, [circa 1476-7]         $2,3000         Folio        Second edition

This copy is Rubricated throughout with nicely complicated red initals, It is is mound in an age apropraite binding of full calf over wooden boards wit clasps and catches with quite impressve end bands.

“Middleton, Richard of [Richard de Mediavilla] (d. 1302/3), Franciscan friar, theologian, and philosopher, was born about the middle of the thirteenth century in either England or France. The issue of his country of origin has given rise to much discussion, and remains unresolved, but it is at least possible that he was a member of the Northumberland family of Menevill or Meynil, whose name was Latinized as Mediavilla. It is certain, however, that he studied at Paris, where he formed part of the so-called neo-Augustinian movement, defending the philosophy and theology of Augustine against the inroads of Aristotelianism, during the years 1276–87. He probably studied under William of Ware and Matteo d’Acquasparta, usually viewed as principal figures in this movement. However, a number of his theses step outside the ordinary confines of this tradition flowing from Bonaventure, for he often sides with the Aristotelian movement as manifested in the works of Thomas Aquinas, especially when dealing with the nature of knowledge.DSC_0126

Middleton’s Commentary on Peter Lombard’s ‘Sentences’ was probably begun in 1281 and was completed in 1284, when he became regent master of the Franciscan school in Paris, a post he held until 1287. The chief characteristic of his Commentary is its sober assessment of many of the positions of Thomas Aquinas. However, the tone of his eighty Quodlibet Questions, produced during his regency, is much more critical and on many issues shows a strong anti-Thomist reaction. In this they have more in common with his disputed questions, which were argued after the condemnations of 1277 but before his Sentences commentary. The latter commentary has been edited along with his Quodlibet Questions. A small number of his disputed questions have also been edited, as have six of his sermons.

Middleton’s link to the neo-Augustinian movement is seen especially in his treatment of the will, even though he does not entirely follow his teachers, Ware and Acquasparta. For Middleton the will is much more noble than the intellect, since it is much more noble to love God than to understand him. Understanding without the corresponding love separates man from God. However, the key to the will’s nobility is its freedom. The intellect is forced by evidence when evidence is given; the will also is forced by its nature to seek the good, but it is free in choosing the means to its predetermined goal. Even if the intellect were prudent enough to show man the best means to his goal, he would not be forced to adopt them. ‘For although the intellect, like a servant with a lamp, points out the way, the will, like the master, makes the decisions and can go in any direction it pleases’ (Stegmüller, 722).

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The superiority of the human will over the intellect further manifests itself in Middleton’s conception of the nature of theology. Certainly, the study of the scriptures attempts to clarify human knowledge of both creator and creatures; principally, however, it aims to stimulate man’s affections. Middleton believes that scripture prescribes laws, forbids, threatens, attracts man through promises, and shows him models of behaviour that he should follow or avoid. The study of scripture perfects the soul, moving it toward the good through fear and love. It is more of a practical science than a speculative endeavour. A theology that is speculative is one that models itself on the theology of the metaphysician or philosopher and tends to reduce Christian faith to reason.

The influence of Aquinas is more in evidence in Middleton’s theory of knowledge. Middleton rejects the illumination theory of Bonaventure and his more loyal followers. Man’s intellectual knowledge can be explained, he argues, by the abstraction performed by the agent intellect from the singulars experienced by the human senses. In short, human individuals know, and they know by means of their own intellectual efforts, not by some special divine illumination. Unlike those who endorse the illumination theory, Middleton contends that there is no direct knowledge of spiritual beings, including God. God is not the first thing known. He can be known only by starting with creatures and by reasoning about their origins or final end. Middleton died in Rheims on 30 March 1302 or 1303.” [Oxford DNB]
Goff M-424;BMC V 206.

 

David Pearson workshop on ‘Provenance in Books’

The Value of Historic Bookbindings: A St Andrews Perspective, which highlighted the uniqueness of the bindings of early printed books and how they can contribute to our knowledge of not just the history of a specific book, but also the history of how previous owners or readers encountered texts as they were passed through from hand to hand.

Echoes from the Vault

On 21-22 November, Special Collections welcomed David Pearson, former Director of Culture, Heritage & Libraries for the City of London Corporation and author of Provenance Research in Book History (1994),English Bookbinding Styles (2005) and Books as History (2008), for a workshop on provenance in printed books. Over the course of two days, staff, students and academics were treated to a full programme of sessions ranging from the general principles of provenance, through annotations, palaeography, bookplates and heraldry. Pearson illustrated his sessions using examples gleaned from the St Andrews University Library collections which he had selected in an intensive research day in the stacks with Elizabeth Henderson, Rare Books Librarian.

An example of manuscript additions and a dried plant sample, found in an 18th century gardening manual.

A discussion regarding the content of some particularly difficult annotations and ownership inscriptions – palaeographers never agree!

The end paper of…

View original post 288 more words

The Holy Grail…

In the clear light Of the fire, [Perceval] could see, behind him, The page in charge of his weapons And armor, and handed him The sword, to hold with the rest. And then he rejoined his host, Who’d done him so great an honor. They sat in a hall lit As brightly as candles can […]

via The Great Myths #10: The Holy Grail Appears (Old French) — word and silence

“Truth consists of an adequation between the intellect and a thing”

930G Thomas Aquinas 1225-1274. editor Theodoricus de Susteren.

Summa de veritate celeberrimi doctoris s[an]cti Thome Aquinatis. que olim … me[n]dis scatebat. Nouissime iam per … magistru[m] nostru[m] Theodericum de Susteren co[n]uentus Coloniens[is] fratru[m] predicatoru[m] regentem … laboriose reuisa … feliciter incipit.

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930G Thomas Aquinas 1225-1274

Summa de veritate celeberrimi doctoris s[an]cti Thome Aquinatis. que olim … me[n]dis scatebat. Nouissime iam per … magistru[m] nostru[m] Theodericum de Susteren co[n]uentus Coloniens[is] fratru[m] predicatoru[m] regentem … laboriose reuisa … feliciter incipit.

Cologne : Heinrich Quentell, 7 Mar. 1499                                        $11,500

Folio 10 1/2 X 8 inches 2°: A-Z6,Aa-Gg6; {signature Dd signed De)   Third Edition/The final 15th century edition.

Blind-tooled front and back covers (including some blind-tooled letters), full calf on DSC_0122thick boards. Clasps missing, catchplates present. Foxing throughout, with some red and green ink dots along edges. Front pastedown shows slight signs of water damage. Occasional small red stains on text block (e.g. E3v and Q5), likely from the books’ rubricator, but otherwise a clean text block. “Summa de veritate celeberrimi doctoris sancti Thome Aquinatis…”First written around 1256, Thomas Aquinas’ “Disputed Questions on Truth” defends “the view that truth consists of an adequation between the intellect and a thing… Most importantly, he develops a notion of truth of being (what might be called “ontological truth”) along with truth of the intellect (what might be called “logical truth”)” (Wippel, 295)

DSC_0126Sections include: Truth; God’s Knowledge; Ideas; The Divine Word; Providence; Predestination; The Book of Life; The Knowledge of Angels; The Communication of Angelic Knowledge; The Mind; The Teacher; Prophecy; Rapture; Faith; Higher and Lower Reason; Synderesis; Conscience; The Knowledge of the First Man in the State of Innocence; Knowledge of the Soul After Death; The Knowledge of Christ; Good; The Tendency to Good and the Will; God’s Will; Free Choice; Sensuality; The Passions of the Soul; Grace; The Justification of Sinners; and The Grace of Christ.

For each topic, Aquinas reviews the topic’s Difficulties, and then responses with ‘To the Contrary’ and ‘Reply’. Aquinas concludes each topic with an “Answers to Difficulties” section, demonstrating his typical insightful worldview and readable literary style.“Everything is a being essentially. But a creature is good not essentially but by participation. Good, therefore, really adds something to being (“Good” [U1v]

translation from   http://dhspriory.org/thomas/QDdeVer21.htm).

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Goff T181;(Columbia University, Union Theological Seminary;HEHL; LC ;Massachusetts Historical Society;YUL)  ;  BMC I, 289/90; Only one Copy in The British Isles (BL)

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Impressa Agrippine. opera atq[ue] impe[n]sis p[ro]uidi viri Henrici Quentell. ciuis eiusdem. Anno salutis humane nonagesimonono supra millesimumquadringentesimu[m] Ipso die celebritatis autoris cursu felici ad finem vsq[ue] perducta.

 

Yet another Witchcraft Demonology book!

122J Franciscus Glogovaz (Verf. Franciscus Glogovaz, Pindarensis Istrianus Theologus)

Fasciculus Benedictionum Exorcismorum, & s-l500validissimarum Conjurationum ad effugandas aereas tempestates. Ex approbatis Libris à S. R. E.collectus. Litaniae quoque, & duodecim Evangelia cum suis orationibus pro benedicendis agris, & fructibus terrae. Praetereà Benedictiones super Cruces, quae in triviis collocantur, ac contra vermes, locustas, et alia animalia fruges vastantia est. Dedicatus reverendissimus domini domino Ioanni Fattori.

Venetiis  : J.A. Remmdinus 1703        $2,800

DuodecimoA-C12, [72 Pp] 6 X 3 inches First edition Bound in contemporary rippled and s-l1600-3soiled vellum covered boards. Plain endpapers, the rear pastedown lifted to reveal an early piece of color wallpapering.  There is portion excised from head of pp29/30 with loss of thirteen lines of text on each side, otherwise complete, meeting collation: 72pp, with woodcut device to title page, decorative initials, head and tailpieces. This copy also has an interesting 14pp of period old manuscript notes in two different hands, bound at rear- surely worth the time to translate and almost certainly with additional occult content. A well used copy; externally rubbed scuffed and bumped, corners abraded, vellum browned and marked but intact . Text block is quite firm, some browning / finger soiling consummate with age and use: recent notes in blue ink to lower margin at pp53, earlier notes in red ink to same point on following page: a few other ink or pencil markings, else unmarked.

s-l1600-6

Rare( no copy in the US according to OCLC) First (and only)  edition of this uncommon collection of prayers, ritualistic exorcisms and demonic possession/prevention, many of which are aimed at protecting crops and fruits against the ravages of storms, plagues, and other evils from below. From a time when the exorcisms were not prohibited and were accepted as an important part of the work of Christian priests, and penetrated all aspects of ones life, even the harvests. bound in period rippled and smoked vellum covered boards. Period plain endpapers, the rear pastedown lifted to reveal an early piece of decorated paper.. s-l1600-4s-l1600-2

Yet another Witchcraft Demonology book!

122J Franciscus Glogovaz (Verf. Franciscus Glogovaz, Pindarensis Istrianus Theologus)

 

 

 

 

 

Fasciculus Benedictionum Exorcismorum, & s-l500validissimarum Conjurationum ad effugandas aereas tempestates. Ex approbatis Libris à S. R. E.collectus. Litaniae quoque, & duodecim Evangelia cum suis orationibus pro benedicendis agris, & fructibus terrae. Praetereà Benedictiones super Cruces, quae in triviis collocantur, ac contra vermes, locustas, et alia animalia fruges vastantia est. Dedicatus reverendissimus domini domino Ioanni Fattori.

Venetiis  : J.A. Remmdinus 1703        $2,800

DuodecimoA-C12, [72 Pp] 6 X 3 inches First edition Bound in contemporary rippled and s-l1600-3soiled vellum covered boards. Plain endpapers, the rear pastedown lifted to reveal an early piece of color wallpapering.  There is portion excised from head of pp29/30 with loss of thirteen lines of text on each side, otherwise complete, meeting collation: 72pp, with woodcut device to title page, decorative initials, head and tailpieces. This copy also has an interesting 14pp of period old manuscript notes in two different hands, bound at rear- surely worth the time to translate and almost certainly with additional occult content. A well used copy; externally rubbed scuffed and bumped, corners abraded, vellum browned and marked but intact . Text block is quite firm, some browning / finger soiling consummate with age and use: recent notes in blue ink to lower margin at pp53, earlier notes in red ink to same point on following page: a few other ink or pencil markings, else unmarked.

s-l1600-6

Rare( no copy in the US according to OCLC) First (and only)  edition of this uncommon collection of prayers, ritualistic exorcisms and demonic possession/prevention, many of which are aimed at protecting crops and fruits against the ravages of storms, plagues, and other evils from below. From a time when the exorcisms were not prohibited and were accepted as an important part of the work of Christian priests, and penetrated all aspects of ones life, even the harvests. bound in period rippled and smoked vellum covered boards. Period plain endpapers, the rear pastedown lifted to reveal an early piece of decorated paper.. s-l1600-4s-l1600-2

Mummies, Burning Mirrors, & Snake Stones – An Embattled Kircher Ghost-writes a Defense of His Work

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123J [KIRCHER, ATHANASIUS] Petrucci, Gioseffo

Prodomo apologetico alli studi Chircheriani. Opera di Gioseffo Petrucci Romano ; nella quale con un’ apparato di saggi diversi, si dà prova dell’ esquisito studio ha tenuto il celebratissimo padre Atanasio Chircher, circa il credere all’ opinioni degli scrittori, sì de’ tempi andati, come de’ presenti, e particolarmente intorno a quelle cose naturali dell’ India, che gli furon portate, ò referte da’ quei, che abitarano quelle parti.

Amsterdam: Presso li Janssonio-Waesbergj, 1677                    $13,500

Quarto: 22.3 x 16.8 cm. Engraved t.p., [16], 200 p., [9] leaves of plates (5 folding, 4 full-page)

SOLE EDITION of this extremely rare book.

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Bound in 19th cent. quarter calf with gold fillets and a red morocco label on the spine. A very good copy with occasional light spotting. Illustrated with 22 engraved and woodcut figures, mostly full-page, and 5 folding engraved plates: at pp. 48 (Vesuvius), 109 (an Egyptian funeral chamber with mummies), 111 (map of southern Africa), 128 (Archimedes’ fabled burning mirror), p. 195 (pyramids). The 4 full-page engravings illustrate the Rosa Sinensis. The frontispiece and some plates a bit shaved in the outer margin. Bound at the end there is an unrelated religious work printed at Venice in 1744.

3463_4“An Apologetic Forerunner to Kircherian Studies” is a remarkable defense of Athanasius Kircher’s writings, written at Kircher’s behest (and undoubtedly with his input) by Gioseffo Petruccio, one of his last disciples and devotees.

The book was prompted by the naturalist Francesco Redi’s critique of some of Kircher’s (many) pseudo-scientific writings. Redi had challenged Kircher’s claims about the curative qualities of so-called “snake stones”, small stones discovered in the heads of certain snakes in Asia. Kircher initiated the exchange by writing to Redi that he had used a snake stone to heal both a dog and a farmer, both of whom had been bitten by vipers. (The farmer had been bitten by accident; Kircher had exposed to the dog to the viper on purpose, as an experiment.) Redi responded to Kircher’s letter with one of his own, detailing his own experiments with the stones, performed in the presence of “many of the wisest and most reliable philosophers” in Pisa. Redi, unsurprisingly, found the stones to be useless.

3463_8Kircher wrote a response to Redi’s letter, criticizing Redi’s method and defending his own, but was dissuaded from publishing it by other scholars at the Collegio Romano who feared embarrassment, given the overwhelming scientific evidence in support of Redi’s conclusions. So Kircher turned instead to Petrucci to pen the “Prodromo” on his behalf.

But the “Prodromo” was to be more than a defense against Redi. As his works had multiplied and his fame grew, Kircher’s fantastic claims and methods met with an ever-increasing number of challenges from respected members of the international republic of letters. Moreover, enthusiasm for Kircher’s work had waned and his reputation suffered even at Rome. In order to restore his image and shore up his legacy, Kircher needed a comprehensive defense of his methods and the many astounding claims that he had made in his thirty-six (!) published works. In the “Prodromo”, Petrucci champions Kircher’s pronouncements on mummies, volcanoes, optical tricks, parabolic mirrors; mermaids, pyramids, Chinese philosophy and religion, flying cats, hieroglyphics, sea serpents, etc.

3463_6Petrucci’s work was an effort to push back at Kircher’s critics, who are symbolized on the engraved title page by a crocodile, whose mouth is being held shut by a putto, who holds aloft a long scroll with Petrucci’s defense written upon it.

“Petrucci painted a portrait of Kircher as he wanted to be remembered: a judicious experimenter who carefully weighed all the evidence before coming to any conclusions. Emphasizing Kircher’s skepticism about natural phenomena, Petrucci countered the image of his master as a gullible consumer of tall tales about strange things by presenting him as the logical heir to Galileo.” (Findlen, The Last Man who Knew Everything, p. 39).

“As portrayed by Petrucci, Kircher was not a credulous fool but rather like a modern skeptic. In the case of the snake stones, even though various priests in India ‘constantly insisted on the marvelous virtues of these stones, and each one of them had their own sensory experience with them,’ Kircher did not simply believe them. ‘He did not go according to the testimonials he collected, blindly ceding his will to odd stories,’ Petrucci wrote. ‘but kept his mind uncontaminated in the quest for truth until he would be able to learn from experiment and see for himself.’3463_5

“It was in the face of evidence, Petrucci argued, that Kircher distinguished himself from Redi, who Petrucci claimed was too narrow-minded to accept anything but his own preconceived notions about the natural world. For Kircher’s willingness to be open to new and surprising discoveries, Petrucci went so far as to compare him to Galileo. Or, since Kircher was behind Petrucci’s argument, it was Kircher himself who made the case for the comparison, and who probably believed it. The book quoted many passages from ‘Il Saggiatore’ (1623), in which Galileo described the experience of coming under constant criticism, an experience Kircher must have recognized as his own.

When the time came to publish Petrucci’s “Prodromo”, Jansson, Kircher’s publisher at Amsterdam, hesitated to publish it. When the book went on sale in Rome at the Collegio Romano, only two copies were sold, one to the dedicatee’s emissary, another at Kircher’s request.

Cicognara 3306

 

 

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