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Month

March 2017

Raymond of Sabunde: From scripture to Reason.

723G   Raymond, of Sabunde, .        d 1436

Theologia naturalis sive Liber creatura[rum] specialiter de homine [et] de natura eius in qua[n]tum homo. :[et] de his qu[a] sunt ei necessaria ad cognoscendu[m] seip[su]m [et] Deu[m] [et] om[n]e debitu[m] ad q[uo]d ho[mo] tenet[ur] et obligatur tam Deo q[uam] p[ro]ximo.  

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Impressus Nurembergae : Per Anthoniu[m] koberger [sic] inibi co[n]cluem,1502      $7,800

Folio, 11X 8 inches . This is about the fifth printed edition. A-Q8 R6   In this copy there are contemporary manuscript initials added in red and blue,DSC_0006 There is a gilt initial at the beginning of the prologue tooled in the gold leaf into a gesso ground. It is bound in full contemporary Nuremberg blind-tooled brown sheepskin over wooden boards,lacking clasps, titled is blind stamped on front board with contemporary paper label; There are several inscriptions on title, including reference to the Prologue’s inclusion on the Index Prohibitorum;(1589)there are the usual stains, browning and internal wear, some marginal rodent damage, the binding has been rebacked,it is a good solid copy .DSC_0004

 

Sabunde was Born at Barcelona, Spain, towards the end of the fourteenth century; died 1432. From 1430 to his death he taught theology, philosophy, and medicine at the University of Toulouse. Apparently, he wrote several works on theology and philosophy, only one of which remains, “Theologia Naturalis”. It was first written in Spanish then translated into Latin.

This text marks the dawn of a knowledge based on  both Scripture and Reason.

The Catholic Encyclopedia sees this as “It represents a phase of decadent Scholasticism, and is a defense of a point of view which is subversive of the fundamental principle of the Scholastic method. The Schoolmen of the thirteenth century, while holding that there can be no contradiction between theology and philosophy, maintain that the two sciences are distinct. Raymond breaks down the distinction by teaching a kind of theosophy, the doctrine, namely that, as man is a connecting link between the natural and the supernatural, it is possible by a study of human nature to arrive at a knowledge even of the most profound mysteries of Faith. The tendency of his thought is similar to that of the rationalistic theosophy of Raymond Lully….Moreover, in Spain scholastics, in combating Islam, borrowed the weapons of their erudite antagonists. Close internal resemblance indicates that Raimund de Sabunde was preceded in method and object by Raymund Lully.” CE

What is new and epoch-making is not the material but the method; not of circumscribing religion within the limits of reason, but, by logical collation, of elevating the same upon the basis of natural truth to a science accessible and convincing to all. He recognizes two sources of knowledge, the book of nature and the Bible. The first is universal and direct, the other serves partly to instruct man the better to understand nature, and partly to dsc_0008reveal new truths, not accessible to the natural understanding, but once revealed by God made apprehensible by natural reason.   The book of nature, the contents of which are manifested through sense experience and self-consciousness, can no more be falsified than the Bible and may serve as an exhaustive source of knowledge; but through the fall of man it was rendered obscure, so that it became incapable of guiding to the real wisdom of salvation. However, the Bible as well as illumination from above, not in conflict with nature, enables one to reach the correct explanation and application of natural things and self. Hence, his book of nature as a human supplement to the divine Word is to be the basic knowledge of man, because it subtends the doctrines of Scripture with the immovable foundations of self-knowledge, and therefore plants the revealed truths upon the rational ground of universal human perception, internal and external.

The first part presents analytically the facts of nature in ascending scale to man,the climax; the second, the harmonization of these with Christian doctrine and their fulfillment in the same. Nature in its. four stages of mere being, mere life, sensible consciousness, and self-consciousness, is crowned by man, who is not only the microcosm but the image of God. Nature points toward a supernatural creator possessing in himself in perfection all properties of the things created out of nothing (the cornerstone of natural theology ever after). Foremost is the ontological argument of Ansehn, followed by the physico-theological, psychological, and moral. He demonstrates the Trinity by analogy from rational grounds, and finally ascribes to man in view of his conscious elevation over dsc_0039-2things a spontaneous gratitude to God. Love is transformed into the object of its affection; and love to God brings man, and with him the universe estranged by sin, into harmony and unity with him. In this he betrays his mystical antecedents. Proceeding in the second part from this general postulation to its results for positive Christianity, he finds justified by reason all the historic facts of revealed religion, such as the person and works of Christ, as well as the infallibility of the Church and the Scriptures; and the necessity by rational proof of all the sacraments and practices of the Church and of the pope. It should be added that Raimund’s analysis of nature and self-knowledge is not thoroughgoing and his application is far from consistent. He does not transplant himself to the standpoint of the unbeliever, but rather executes an apology on the part of a consciousness already Christian, thus assuming conclusions in advance that should grow only out of his premises.   Yet his is a long step from the barren speculation of scholasticism, and marks the dawn of a knowledge based on Scripture and reason.

 

Montaigne (Essays, bk. ii. ch. xii., “An Apologie of Raymond Sebond”) tells how he translated the book into French and found “the conceits of the author to be excellent, the contexture of his work well followed, and his project full of pietie.. .. His drift is bold, and his scope adventurous, for he undertaketh by humane and naturall reasons, to establish and verifie all the articles of Christian religion against Atheists.” See D. Beulet, Un Inconnu celebre: recherches historiques et critiques sur Raymond de Sabunde (Paris, 1875).

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seee:
Mariàngela Vilallonga, Ramon Sibiuda in La literatura llatina a Catalunya al segle XV, p. 208
&
S. Peterfreund, Turning Points in Natural Theology from Bacon to Darwin: The Way of the Argument from Design, p.3-9

 

The School Of Recreation

Being a person of divers interests, it is not all that often that I (or even you gentle reader) find an early modern book which discusses more than a few of them, but alas today I have a book to offer which discusses  many of them!

dsc_0158790G R(obert) H(owllet) fl 1696

The School Of Recreation: Or A Guide To The Most Ingenious Exercises Of Hunting, Riding, Racing, Fireworks, Military Discipline, The Science Of Defence, Hawking, Tennis, Bowling, Singing, Cock-fighting, Fowling, Angling.

London : printed for A. Bettesworth, at the Red-Lyon on London-Bridge, 1710.  $3,400

Duodecimo 5.25 X 3.25 A13, B-G12 Bound in original full calf!

This little handbook, with its many and diverse subjects, provides a tantalizing window onto the past. In his preface, the author advocates the practice of these hobbies for pleasure, to promote a ‘healthful constitution,’ and for ‘profit and advantage.’ Further, he uses the phrase ‘leisure hours’ and recommends practicing these recreations ‘to unbend your cares after the tiresome drudgery of weighty temporal matters.’ He also calls the pursuit of these various diversions harmless, but warns the reader not to become so absorbed in these pastimes that he neglect his other duties.The very idea that people in this period had leisure time is interesting in itself, and the details found inside this volume provide a very clear picture of the activities described. Any student of the past who follows the careful instructions laid out in Howllet’s School of Recreation would be able to re-create the personal entertainments of the English from the end of the seventeenth century.We might expect to read about hunting, but the author also includes a lengthy description of dog breeding, with breeds mentioned by name, advice for what to look for when breeding for specific traits, and details about kenneling and canine health issues. Similarly, the English have had an enthusiasm for riding that goes back through the centuries, and the chapter on horses goes into great detail about training, riding, tack, and more, with a special chapter on racing.

The section on ‘Artificial Fire-works’ is a little less anticipated, and does not disappoint. Howllet categorizes fireworks into three general ‘sorts: ’those that ascend in the air; those that consume on the earth; and such as burn on the water.’ He also describes how to make molds for rockets, and follows with what can only be described as recipes for a sky rocket, golden rain, silver stars, red fiery colored stars, stars that give reports, mortars for balloons, the inimitable ‘flying saucisson,’ (or sausage) for earth and water, fire boxes, fiery lances, trees and fountains of fire, fire wheels, ground rockets, fiery globes. The author describes how to test powder, and some really amazing-sounding fireworks with figures made of cardboard and wicker to look like St. George slaying the dragon, mermaids, and whales. “In [the dragon’s] mouth and eyes you must fix serpents, or small rockets, which being fired at their setting out, will cause a dreadful sight in a dark night.”

The section on military discipline is interesting, but hard to understand practiced as a hobby. I suppose that one needs to be ever at the ready. Fun military exercises done with pikes and muskets are included here, to keep your skills in peak form, even during peacetime. The reader may perform them on foot or while mounted. There is some quite informative directions for fencing.

The chapters that follow are too numerous to treat separately with any fairness. They include sword fighting and fencing, hawking, bowling, tennis, hand bell ringing (with many songs or ‘bobs’ included), vocal music (with two beautiful text diagrams), followed by cock fighting (including advice on caring for your cock which includes, but is not limited to licking his head and eyes with your tongue, and then feeding him hot urine, see page 145), fowling (hunting wild birds like ducks, pheasants, etc.), and finally, fishing (including fly fishing with real and ‘artificial’ flies, and recipes for bait).The School of Recreation continues to educate its readers with innocent and enlightening leisure time activities.

 

ESTC Citation No. T72534Only three copies Harvard, Huntington ,McMaster University.

(See; Chris Philip, A Bibliography of Firework Books, page 74; Westwood and Satchell, Bibliotheca Piscatoria, A Catalogue of Books on Angling, page110; (the fencing section is not listed in Thimm, Bibliography of Fencing and Duelling); John Resler Swift, Bibliotheca Accipitaria II A catalogue of Books Ancient and Modern Relating to Falconry, page 163; Schwerdt, A Catalogue of Books Relating to Hunting, Hawking and Shooting, Volume 4, page 49.)

A bakers dozen of English verse from 1631-702

 

  • Charles Cotton    1630-1687
  • William Davenant, 1606-1668
  • Sir John Davies 1569-1626
  • John Donne. 1571/2-1631
  • Michael Drayton 1563-1631
  • Lord Brooke Fluke Greville 1554-1628
  • George Herbert (1593-1633)
  • George Herbert (1593-1633)
  • Benjamin Jonson ca. 1572-1637
  • Nicholas Ling, ed fl. ca. 1599
  • Nicholas Ling, ed fl. ca. 1599
  • Sir John  Suckling  1609-1642
  • Robert  Wild   1609-1679

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118F     Charles Cotton    1630-1687

            Poems On several Occasions. Written By Charles Cotton, Esq;

London: Printed for Tho. Basset, at the George in Fleet-street; Will. Hinsman and Tho. Fox, in Westminster-Hall, 1689                                $2,000

 

Octavo  7.2 x 4.5 inches   A4, B-Z8, Aa-Zz8.          First edition.                  Bound in full contemporary calf ruled in blind a good unsophisticated copy.      “Another oddly isolated and under-valued poet is Charles Cotton, whose posthumous volume of Poems on Several Occasions (1689) appears to have aroused little contemporary interest, and who was probably little known by the time of Addison and Pope, except for his burlesque poems and The Wonders of the Peak. Yet there is more and better poetry in the 1689 volume than is to be found in any other minor poet of the Restoration: if this was not recognized at the time it must have been because Cotton’s natural vein was out of fashion. There was still a public for the natural that was at the same time low; but by 1689 the polite reader expected a good deal more sophistication and artificiality than Cotton usually gave him. He had to wait until the beginning of the nineteenth century for genuine recognition; and then Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Lamb testified freely to the pleasure his poetry gave them.” (Sutherland)

Wing C-6389; TC II, 254; Grolier, W-P 215; Pforzheimer 221; Hazlit I, 1903.Hayword English Poetry Catalogue, 133

655G  William Davenant, 1606-1668

The Works of Sir William Davenant Kt, Consisting of those which were formerly Printed, and those which he design’d for the Press: Now Published out of the Authors Originall Copies.

London: Henry Herringman, 1673                                $2,500

Folio, 12 3⁄4 X 7 1⁄2 inches . First Editiondsc_0039

π1 2π2 A-3D4 3E2; Aa-Ppp4, Aaaa-Oooo4

Bound with Portrait of Davenant by

Faithorne. An unusually fine, fresh, wide-

margined copy, with a fine impression of

the portrait. Bound in full contemporary

calf with nicely gilt spine. With the

Berland bookplate. The First

Collected Edition, with prefatory material

by Hobbes, ‘The answer of Mr. Hobbes to

Sr. William D’Avenant’s preface before

Gondibert’, and poems by Waller and

Cowley. Several of the plays originally

published in blank verse are here printed

for the first time, converted into prose.

The volume also includes first printings of

‘The Playhouse to be Let’, ‘Law Against Lovers’, ‘News from Plymouth’, ‘The Fair Favourite’, ‘The Distresses’, and ‘The Siege’. The posthumous collection was published under the watchful eye of “Lady Mary” D’Avenant. The poems reflect the attitudes of the Cavalier poets and the received tradition of earlier poets, particularly Shakespeare, Jonson, and Donne. She no doubt also insisted on the fine portrait frontispiece restoring her husband’s missing nose, which he had lost through “illness” in 1638.

Wing D320

 

109F Sir John Davies 1569-1626

The Original, Nature a Nosce teipsum

London: W[illiam] Rogers 1697 $3,000

Octavo A8,b8,B-H8 First Tate Edition Bound in full early calf , it is a nice copy with spine label. Sir John Davies (not to be confused with John Davies of Hereford) was a man of the same pattern, though without lord Brooke’s memory of “the spacious days” and without his deep austerity. He, too, was a man of affairs, and rose to a high position in the state. His life, however, had not the same great beginning, and his was no smooth passage to fame. Born in 1569, at Tisbury in Wiltshire, he went to Winchester and Oxford (partly, it appears, resident at New college, partly at Queen’s college), and, like the majority of young men of the time, came, in 1587, to study law in London. But he quarrelled with the frend to whom he had dedicated his Orchestra, Richard Martin, and, entering the hall, armed with a dagger, he broke his cudgel over Martin’s head, who was eating dinner at the barristers’ table. In consequence of this outrage on the benchers, he was disbarred. For an orphan, with his way to make, the calamity was heavy. He returned to Oxford in 1598, three years after he had been called, and wrote his great poem Nosce Teipsum. Lord Mountjoy, afterwards earl of Devonshire, approved of it so highly that he advised Davies to publish it, with a dedicatory poem to the queen. This, Davies was not slow to do. The poem appeared the year after his expulsion from the bar, and added largely to his growing reputation as a poet. The Hymns to Astroea appeared in the same year, and Davies’s services were in request to write words for “entertainments” offered to her majesty. A Dialogue between a Gentleman Usher and a Poet, A contention betwixt a Wife, a Widdow and a Maide and A Lottery, are the names of those that are extant. A Lottery gained the queen’s acknowledgment, and, through the influence of lord Ellesmere, Davies, after a formal apology to the benchers and to Richard Martin, was reinstated at the bar in 1601. His career now began. He was among those who went with lord Hunsdon to escort king James to the English throne, and James was sufficiently impressed with him to appoint him solicitor-general for Ireland, under lord Mountjoy, then lord deputy. In December, 1603, on his arrival in Dublin, he was knighted, and, some years later, he married the daughter of lord Audley. One of his children was the famous countess of Huntingdon. His work in Ireland, where he remained until 1619, was distinguished, and how deeply he was interested in Irish affairs may be gathered from his Discourse of the true reasons why Ireland has never been intirely subdued till the beginning of His Majesty’s reign. In 1619, he resumed his seat in the House of Commons as member for Newcastle under Lyme, to which he had been elected in 1614, and, just before he could assume the office of chief justice, to which he had been appointed in 1626, he died suddenly of an apoplexy.

28

Orchestra or a Poeme on Dauncing was written before June, 1594, although it was not published until 1596. The poem is in the form of a dialogue between Penelope and one of her suitors, and consists of 131 stanzas of seven lines, each riming ababbcc. In the dedicatory sonnet to “his very friend M.A. Richard Martin,” which, in spite of the reconciliation, was omitted from the edition of 1622, Davies describes the poem as “this suddaine, rash half-capreol of my wit,” and reminds Martin how it was written in fifteen days. The fact is worthy of attention because it shows the writer’s ability and mastery over his material. The poem bears no sign of haste in the making. Gallant and gay, it flows with transparent clearness to its conclusion, and the verse has the happy ease which marks all the work of Davies, and makes it comparable with the music of Mozart.

29

His next work Nosce Teipsum possesses the same fluidity of thought and diction, which is the more remarkable as the poem is deeply philosophical. The sub-title explains the subject: “This oracle expounded in two elegies. 1. Of Human knowledge. 2. Of the Soule of Man and the immortalitie thereof.” The first edition was published in 1599, the second, “newly corrected and amended,” in 1602, the third in 1608, and, of course, the poem was included in the collected edition which Davies himself made of his poems in 1622.

30

“Wouldst thou be crowned the Monarch of a little world? command thyself,” wrote Francis Quarles, who was certainly well-acquainted with Nosce Teipsum, in the second century of his Enchiridion, and that sentence gives the gist of the first part of the poem on Humane Knowledge. Davies then passes on to examine the nature of the soul, its attributes and its connection with the body; and, having defined with exactness what he means by the soul, proceeds to prove its immortality by means of arguments for and against his proposition. Proof in such a matter is not possible; but a personal answer to the great question, so sincerely thought and so lucidly expressed as is this answer of Davies, will always have its value. Nor is Nosce Teipsum a treatise which ingenuity has fashioned into verse and which more properly would be expressed in plain prose. Davies does not, as it were, embroider his theme with verse, but uses verse, and its beauties of line and metaphor, to make his meaning more clear, and, thereby, gallantly justifies the employment of his medium. This mastery of his is enviously complete; but, perhaps, it is most conspicuous in the Hymns to Astroea which were first published in 1599. As the title-page announces, they are written “in Acrosticke verse.” They are twenty-six in number: each poem is of three stanzas (two of five lines, one of six lines), and each line begins with a different letter of the name Elizabetha Regina. Yet, in spite of this fantastic formality, not a line is forced, and one or two of the poems, notably hymn v, To the Lark,

Earley, cheerfule, mounting Larke,

Light’s gentle usher, Morning’s clark,

are exquisite songs.

Wing D-405 Langland to Wither #67

 

138F    John Donne. 1571/2-1631

Poems, &c. By John Donne, late Dean of St. Pauls. With Elegies On The Author’s Death. To which is added Divers Copies under his own hand, Never before Printed.

London: In the Savoy, Printed by T.N. for Henry Herringman, at the sign of the Anchor, in the lower-walk of the New-Exchange, 1669

$7,500

Octavo, 6 1⁄2 x 4 1⁄4.inches. Fifth edition. A4, B-Z8, Aa-Dd8. A1 and Dd8 are both blank and present in this copy. This copy is bound in contemporary full mottled calf. It has been sympathetically rebacked with raised bands and gilt title to spine. One text leaf was torn and repaired. The modern bookplate of noted Donne collector Mr. O. Damgaard-Nielsen is pasted inside the front board. The book is bound in a very humble full calf binding in the style of the period (a charming gentleman in a common coat).

This is the last and most complete edition of Donne’s poetry published in the seventeenth century, and the only Restoration printing. Many textual changes were made in this edition, and five new poems were added, including “To His Mistress Going to Bed,” and “O My America! My New-found-land.”

“The poetry of Donne represents a sharp break with that written by his predecessors and most of his contemporaries. Much Elizabethan verse is decorative and flowery in its quality. Its images adorn, its meter is mellifluous. Image harmonizes with image, and line swells almost predictably into line. Donne’s poetry, on the other hand, is written very largely in conceits— concentrated images which involve an element of dramatic contrast, of strain, or of intellectual difficulty. Most of the traditional ‘flowers of rhetoric’ disappear completely.

For instance, in his love poetry one never encounters bleeding hearts, cheeks like

roses, lips like cherries, teeth like pearls, or Cupid shooting arrows of love. The

tears which flow in A Valediction: of Weeping, are different from, and more

complex than, the ordinary saline fluid of unhappy lovers; they are ciphers,

naughts, symbols of the world’s emptiness without the beloved; or else, suddenly

reflecting her image, they are globes, worlds, they contain the sum of things.

The poet who plays with conceits not only displays his own ingenuity; he may see into

the nature of the world as deeply as the philosopher. Donne’s conceits in

particular leap continually in a restless orbit from the personal to the cosmic and back again.” (Norton Anthology)

Wing D-1871; Keynes 84; Wither to Prior 291.

 

 

420E Michael Drayton 1563-1631

The Battaile of Agincovrt. Fovght by Henry the Fift of that name, King of England, against the whole power of the French: vnder the raigne of their Charles the Sixt, Anno Dom. 1415. The miseries of Queene Margarite, the infortante vvife, of that most infortunate King Henry the Sixt. Nimphidia, the court of Fayrie. The quest of Cinthia. The shepheards sirena. The moone-calfe. Elegies vpon sundry occasions. By Michaell Drayton Esquire.

London: Printed by A.M. for William Lee, 1631                  $3,000

Octavo 6.3 x 4.25 inches A-U8. The inner form of signature H was not re-inked before this impression was printed and therefore the inking is light, though the text is still legible. The lower margins are lightly wormed throughout, occasionally touching a letter in the last printed line. The contents are in good contemporary condition, having avoided the nineteenth century treatment of washing, pressing, and trimming the leaves. Second edition In contrast, this volume is in its original boards of seventeenth century speckled sheepskin that has been recently rebacked. “Born within a year before Shakespeare, and dying when Milton was already twenty-three, he worked hard at poetry during nearly sixty years of his long life, and was successful in keeping in touch with the poetical progress of a crowded and swiftly-moving period. His earliest published work tastes of Tottel’s Miscellany: before he dies, he suggests Carew and Suckling, and even anticipates Dryden. This quality of forming, as it were, a map or mirror of his age gives him a special interest to the student of poetry, which is quite distinct from his peculiar merits as a poet.

“The other of the two odes [most often] referred to is the most famous of Drayton’s poems, the swinging Ballad of Agincourt, dedicated ‘to the Cambro-Britans and their Harpe’. Here, more than anywhere, is heard the echo of Hewes and his like. Drayton worked upon the text of it to good purpose between 1606 and 1619, removing snags and obstructions in the course of its rhythm, and making clearer and clearer the ringing tramp of the marching army. With his stanzas of eight short, crisp lines, rhyming aaabcccb, it is the model for a war-poem; and the brave old song has as much power today to quicken the heartbeats as has the Henry V of Shakespeare, the success of which, doubtless, helped to inspire its composition.

“Drayton’s long and busy life closed at the end of 1631, and his body was buried in Westminster Abbey, under the north wall of the nave, and not in the Poet’s Corner where his bust may be seen. His right to the honour will possibly be more fully conceded by present and future ages than it has been at any other time since his own day. We see in him now, not, indeed, a poet of supreme imagination, nor one who worked a revolution or founded a school, but a poet with a remarkably varied claim on our attention and respect. Drayton was not a leader. For the most part he was a follower, quick to catch, and industrious to reproduce, the feeling and mode of the moment. So great, however, was his vitality and so fully was he a master of his craft that, living from the reign of Elizabeth into that of Charles I, he was able to keep abreast of his swiftly moving times, and, by reason of his very powers of labour, to bring something out of the themes and measures he employed which his predecessors and contemporaries failed to secure, but which after years owed to his efforts. This is especially the case, as we have seen, with his management of the rhymed couplet and the shortlined lyric. Sluggish, perhaps, of temper, and very variably sensitive to inspiration, he lacked the touchstone of perfect poetical taste, and, like Wordsworth, lacked also the finer virtues of omission. Yet everything that he wrote has its loftier moments; he is often ‘golden-mouthed’, indeed, in his felicity of diction, whether in the brave style of his youth or in the daintier manner of his age; and just as, in his attitude to life, ‘out of the strong came forth sweetness’, so, in his poetry, out of his dogged labour came forth sweetness of many kinds. In the long period which his work covered, the many subjects and styles it embraced, the beauty of its results and its value as a kind of epitome of an important era, there are few more interesting figures in English literature than Michael Drayton.” (Cambridge History of English and American Literature)

STC 7191.

770E Lord Brooke Fluke Greville 1554-1628

Certaine Learned And Elegant VVorkes Of The Right Honorable Fvlke Lord Brooke, Written in his Youth, and familiar Exercise with Sir Philip Sidney. The seuerall Names of which Workes the following page doth declare.

London: Printed by E.[lizabeth]P[urslowe]. for Henry Seyle, and are to be sold at his shop at the signe of the Tygers head in St. Paules Church-yard, 1633 5500 Small folio 8 1/4 X 5 1/2 inches π2; d-k4, L2, D-Z4, Aa-Qq4 Rr6, This copy is complete, lacking the first and last blank leaves.

In all the known copies of this work the pagination begins with p. 23, signature d. It is generally believed that the book originally began with “A treatise on religion” said to have been suppressed by order of Archbishop Laud. Grosart thinks the missing pages were prefatory matter containing a life of the author “with fuller details of his murder than his friends cared to let the world read” as stated in Biographia Britannica. cf. Memorial-introd. in Grosart’s edition of Brooke’s works, 1870, and Grolier Club, Catalogue of … works … from Wither to Prior, 1905. First edition. This copy is in good condition internally with only the usual minor dampstaining, and closely trimed . It is bound in full nineteenth century calfskin, ruled in gilt with edges stained safron. The binding has been skillfully rebacked . “Fulke Greville, afterwards lord Brooke, who wrote (but did not publish) at the end of the sixteenth century a miscellaneous collection of poems called Caelica. The collection consisted of one hundred and nine short poems, on each of which the author bestowed the title of sonnet. Only thirty-seven, however, are quatorzains. The remaining seventy-two so-called ‘sonnets’ are lyrics of all lengths and in all meters. There is little internal connection among Brooke’s poems, and they deserve to be treated as a series of independent lyrics. […] The series was published for the first time as late as 1633, in a collection of lord broke’s poetical writings. It may be reckoned the latest example of the Elizabethan sonnet-sequence.” (quoted from page 304, Cambridge History of English Literature, vol. III)

“If Fulke Greville, first Lord Brooke (1554-1628), had been born twenty years later, he might perhaps have stood —with Chapman rather than with Donne— in the forefront of the metaphysical movement. What Edward Phillips called his ‘close, mysterious and sentencious way of writing’ is nearer the metaphysical than the Spenserian manner, yet Greville shows, in Humane Learning, a Hobbesian distrust of metaphor, and his normal utterance is of a massive realistic plainness fitted for sober and penetrating thought. In parts of Caelica, which was begun under Sidney’s inspiration, he wreathed iron pokers into true-love knots, and although, according to Naunton, he ‘lived, dyed, a constant Courtier of the Ladies,’ no series of love poems was ever less amorous. For all the Petrarchan and Sidneian fancies, and the omnipresence of Cupid, Caelica, Myra, and Cynthia are something less than shadows, and towards the end they fade away altogether behind religious and philosophical reflection.” (quoted from page 94, Bush’s English Literature in the Earlier Seventeenth Century) STC 12361,; Grolier’s Wither to Prior, # 406; Pforzheimer 437.;Hayward #68

 

689G George Herbert (1593-1633) and Christopher Harvey 1597-1663

The Temple. Sacred Poems and Private Ejaculations. By Mr. George Herbert, Late Oratour of the University of Cambridge. Together with his Life. with several Additions. Psal. 29. In his Temple doth every man speak of his honour. The Tenth Edition, with an Alphabetical Table for ready finding out the chief places.

[bound with]

The Synagogue: Or The Shadow Of The Temple. Sacred Poems, And Private Ejaculations. In Imitation of Mr. George Herbert. The Sixth Edition, Corrected and Enlarged.

dsc_0006

London: Printed by W. Godbid, for R.S. and are to be Sold by John Williams Junior, in Cross-Key Court in Little-Britain, 1674

London: Printed for Robert Stephens, at the Kings-Arms in Chancery-Lane, 1673  $4,500

Duodecimo 5 ¾ x 3 ½ inches [π]6, [*]5, A-L12, K6; A-C12; A-B12, C6. The tenth edition. This copy is a very nice and tidy copy bound in 19th century vellum over boards. A very nice copy .

dsc_0005This work contains 140 stanzic patterns, including the most famous shaped poem in the English language. Herbert’s reputation rests on this remarkable collection of poems which mark perfectly the Metaphysical tone of his spiritual unrest which is resolved in final peace. “the Herbert we know through ‘Aaron,’ ‘Discipline,’ ‘The Collar,’ ‘The Pulley,’ and many other poems in which he strives to subdue the willful or kindle the apathetic self. His principal themes are those ‘two vast, spacious things, Sinne and Love.’ There is nothing soft in the poet who seeks to engrave divine love in steel; and a catalogue of gratuitous, untempered, and short-lived sweets leads up to the magnificent contrast of the disciplined soul that ‘never gives.’ (Bush)

Wing H-1521; Wing H-1049; Palmer IV, 12.

 

678F George Herbert 1593-1633

The Temple. Sacred Poems, And Private Ejaculations. By Mr. George Herbert, Late Orator of the University of Cambridge. Together with His Life. Psal. xxix. In his Temple doth every Man speak of his Honour. The Twelfth Edition Corrected, with the Addition of an Alphabetical Table.

[bound with]

The Synagogue: Or, The Shadow Of The Temple. Sacred Poems, And Private Ejaculations. In Imitation of Mr. George Herbert.

London: Printed by J. Barber, for Jeffery Wale, at the Angel in St. Paul’s Church-Yard, 1703                 $3,100

Duodecimo 6 x 3 ¾ inches A-K12; A-E12, F6. The twelfth edition of the Herbert and the eighth edition of the Harvey. This is a very fresh copy in contemporary paneled calf, rebacked. “We may partly distinguish two poets in Herbert. There is, first, the parish priest of early seventeenth-century England who revered his Church as a chaste mother neither ‘painted’ nor ‘undrest;’ who deplored the worm of schism eating away the English rose and (to the disturbance of the Cambridge licenser in 1633) saw Religion standing “on tip-toe in our land, Readie to passe to the American strand;” who celebrated with loving particularity and complete security of belief the meaning of God’s temple and worship. It is this poet who can be fully appreciated, in Coleridge’s works, only by ‘an affectionate and dutiful child of the Church;’ and it is to Herbert’s writings and life that we owe much of our picture of the order, strength, and beauty of seventeenth-century Anglicanism at its best. But church-bells are heard beyond the stars, and the Anglican parish priest merges with the larger poet, with the very human saint who gives fresh and moving utterance to the aspirations and failures of the spiritual life. This is the Herbert we know through ‘Aaron,’ ‘Discipline,’ ‘The Collar,’ ‘The Pulley,’ and many other poems in which he strives to subdue the willful or kindle the apathetic self. His principal themes are those ‘two vast, spacious things … Sinne and Love.’ There is nothing soft in the poet who seeks to engrave divine love in steel; and a catalogue of gratuitous, untempered, and short-lived sweets leads up to the magnificent contrast of the disciplined soul that ‘never gives.’

“As the Anglican merges with the greater poet, so the ‘quaint’ writer merges with the metaphysical. Herbert had his share of the age’s passion for anagrams and the like, which Addison was to condemn as ‘false Wit.’ But the poet who could shape a poem in the physical likeness of ‘The Altar’ or ‘Easter Wings’ had, even more than most of his fellows, a functional sense of meter and rhythm. The technical experimentalist and master was, we remember, a skilled and devoted musician. The movement of his verse, taut or relaxed, can suggest all his fluctuating moods, from self-will or weakness to joyful surrender and assured strength. He moves from this world to the world of the spirit ‘As from one room t’another, or dwells simultaneously in both, and it is in keeping with that habit of mind, and with metaphysical origins in general, that many of his poems should be allegorical anecdotes, transfigured emblems. Apart from some of his fine dramatic openings, Herbert does not attempt the high pitch of Donne’s ‘Divine Poems.’ His great effects are all the greater for rising out of a homely, colloquial quietness of tone; and peace brings quiet endings— ‘So I did sit and eat;’ ‘And I reply’d, My Lord.’ Though the friend and admirer of Donne (and of Bacon), Herbert did not cultivate scholastic or scientific imagery; mature and everyday life, the Bible and the liturgy were his chief sources. The highest truth, as he said more than once, must be plainly dressed. In spite of his classical learning and his Latin and Greek verse, he avoided the common surface classicism of the time. Of the elements of a deeper classicism, if we care to use that name, he had muscular density, precision, deceptive simplicity, and a dynamic sense of form. At times his structure may be a winding stair, but it is all built of seasoned timber.” (Bush) Palmer IV, 15.

 

683G Benjamin Jonson ca. 1572-1637

The Works of Ben Jonson, which were formerly Printed in Two Volumes, are now Reprinted in One, to which is added a Comedy, called the New Inn, with Additions never before Published.

London: Printed by Thomas Hodgkin, for H. Herringman, E. Brewster, T. Bassett, R. Chiswell, M. Wotton, G. Conyers, 1692                  $7,500

Folio 14 1/2 x 9 inches A6, B-Ll4, Oo-Bbb4, Ccc2, Eee-Zzz4, Aaaa-Zzzz4, Aaaaa4, Bbbbb6. “Dr. Greg called attention to the fact that sheet Ccc of this volume is invariably discolored. Besides that sheet, in all copies examined, sheet Zz2-3 is likewise foxed.” (Pforzheimer) Notably, these sheets are printed on paper which has a watermark not found elsewhere in the volume. The foxing is most likely due to the inferior quality of the paper, since all offending sheets share the same watermark.

First complete collected edition. This copy is bound in contemporary calf with a gilt stamp of initals under a correnet which has been rebacked. It is a very large and clean copy.

This edition, the last of the folio editions, of Ben Jonson’s works. It is truly complete, containing all the masques; epigrams; plays; verse letters and panegyrics; sonnets; the English Grammar; Timber, or Discoveries; and the translation of Horace’s de Arte Poetica. The New Inne is included in this collected edition for the first time.

“Jonson’s life was tough and turbulent. After his father’s early death, Ben was adopted in infancy by a bricklayer and educated by the great classical scholar and antiquarian William Camden, before necessity drove him to enter the army. In Flanders, where the Dutch with English help were warring against the Spaniards, he fought single-handed with one of the enemy before the massed armies, and killed his man. Returning to England about 1595, he began to work as an actor and playwright but was drawn from one storm center to another. He killed a fellow actor in a duel, and escaped the gallows only by pleading ‘benefit of the clergy’ (i.e., by proving he could read and write, which entitled him to plead before a more lenient court). He was jailed for insulting the Scottish nation at a time when King James was newly arrived from Scotland. He took furious part in an intricate set of literary wars with his fellow playwrights. Having converted to Catholicism, he was the object of deep suspicion after the Gunpowder Plot of Guy Fawkes (1605), when the phobia against his religion reached its height. Yet he rode out all these troubles, growing mellower as he grew older, and in his latter years became the unofficial literary dictator of London, the king’s pensioned poet, a favorite around the court, and the good friend of men like Shakespeare, Donne, Francis Beaumont, John Selden, Francis Bacon, dukes, diplomats, and distinguished folk generally. In addition, he engaged the affection of younger men (poets like Robert Herrick, Thomas Carew, and Sir John Suckling, speculative thinkers like Lord Falkland and Sir Kenelm Digby), who delighted to christen themselves ‘sons of Ben.’ Sons of Ben provided the nucleus of the entire ‘Cavalier school’ of English poets.” (Norton Anthology of English Literature)

Wing J-1006; Pforzheimer 561.

 

779G Nicholas Ling, ed fl. ca. 1599

Politeuphuia, Wits Common-wealth. Newly corrected and amended.

 

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London : M. Flesher, to be sold byGeorge Badger 1647. $4,900

Duodecimo 5 3⁄4 x 3 1⁄4 inches. A-O12. 14th edition(?), first printed in 1597.(To the reader: “Courteous reader, encouraged by thy kind acceptance, of the first and second impression of Wits Common-wealth, I have once more adventured to present thee with the foureteenth edition.”) This copy is bound in ninteenth century full calf edges gilt a very lovely copy.

Usually ascribed to John Bodenham, who planned the collection, though the work appears to have been done by Nicholas Ling. Cf. Dedication; also DNB.p. Often cited as Wits’ commonwealth, and some editions appeared under that title. Published first in 1597, as the first in a series of which Mere’s “Palladis tamia”, 1598, was the second, “Wits theater of the little world,” by Robert Allott, 1598, the third, and “Palladis palatium, wisedoms’ pallace,” 1604, the fourth. Cf. DNB. “The popularity of this book, of which altogether some eighteen editions before the end of the seventeenth-century were issued, was due it would seem to the fact that it filled a peculiar need of the public of the day. It is difficult to imagine the style and tone of the conversation of the later years of Elizabeth’s court — the written word is the only clue. But it is certain that the more commonly endowed members of a society which included men of such wide reading and extensive knowledge as Bacon, Selden, Jonson and Raleigh must have frequently felt the need of some compendium of wise and sententious aphorisms by means of which they might ornament their discourse. It is just that function which this volume appears to be intended to fulfill for it is a compilation of precepts and maxims, frequently with their source noted, gathered under various heads such as ‘Of Courage’, ‘Of Nobilitie’, etc. Each division begins with a definition and ends with a Latin quotation, while the tables which are appended enable one to search not only the divisional topics, but also the individual aphorism much in the manner of a modern Bartlett.

“The popularity of this type of manual in the early years of the seventeenth century may be compared with the deluge of ‘outlines’ of this and that which the public of the present day is encouraged to imagine will provide a short and easy road to knowledge and culture. This appears to be substantiated by the fact that this book is but one, the first of a series, of four volumes which for the want of a better name is called the ‘Wits Series’. From the fact that there is no indication in this book that it was to be followed by others it may be assumed that the series, as a series at least, was not projected until after the demand for this first book indicated the public taste.

“In the address To the Reader, which otherwise appears to be a reprint of the text of the third edition, the present is numbered the ‘fifteenth edition’. It is quite possible that it is the fifteenth but we have only the publisher’s word as no copies of editions five to eight can be traced, and it is a well known ‘puffing’ device to misnumber editions.” (Pforzheimer)

Wing L- 2344; see Pforzheimer 802.;McKerrow 259 [triple star])

Copies – N.America: Harvard University , Lehigh University ,Library of Congress , William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, University of

 

 

551G Nicholas Ling , ed

fl. ca. 1599

Politeuphuia, Wits Common-wealth. Newly corrected and amended.

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London : printed for E. Flesher, in the year 1684.              $2,900

Duodecimo 5 3⁄4 x 3 1⁄4 in A-O12 (lacking A1, blank). [8], 321, [7] p. ; 12 .

edition(?), first printed in 1597.  Bound in full period style calf, a very nice copy.

Copies – N.America: Folger Shakespeare, Harvard University, Huntington , Indiana University, San Francisco, University of Cincinnati, University of Illinois

Wing L-2337; Pforzheimer 803.

 

644F   Titus Carus    Lucretius        95-52 B.C.

 

Titus Lucretius Carus His Six Books Of Epicurean Philosophy, Done into English Verse, with Notes. The Third Edition. Demetri, Teq; Tigelli Discipulorum inter jubeo plorare Cathedras; i, Puer, atque meo citus hœc subscribe libello.          

 

       London: Printed for Thomas Sawbridge at the Three Flewer-de-luces in little Britain, and Anthony Stephens Bookseller near the Theatre in Oxford, 1683 $2, 100

 

Octavo            7 ½ x 4 ½ inches   (a*)4, ¶2, (A)-(D)4, A-Z4, Aa-Ee4, (a)-(h)4, I2.(This copy has an extra blank bound after the title page.)            Third edition.             The engraved frontispiece is bound opposite the title. This copy is bound in contemporary calfskin, and has been rebacked.       This translation was prepared by Thomas Creech (1659-1700). The prefatory material contains commendatory poems by John Evelyn, Nathaniel Tate, Thomas Otway, and Aphra Behn among others, many of which were added after the first and second editions and this, the third edition contains the first appearance of several poems. The influence of Lucretius can be seen in Pope’s ‘Essay on Man.’ Lucretius was also favorite reading of Shelley, Wordsworth, and Tennyson.

“Creech’s translation of Lucretius vied in popularity with Dryden’s Virgil and Pope’s Homer. The son of one of his friends is reported to have said that the translation was made in Creech’s daily walk round the parks in Oxford in sets of fifty lines, which he would afterwards write down in his chamber and correct at leisure. […] When Dryden published his translations from Theocritus, Lucretius, and Horace, he disclaimed in the preface any intention of robbing Creech ‘of any part of that commendation which he has so justly acquired,’ and referred to his predecessor’s ‘excellent annotations, which I have often reprinted in the last century, and was included in the edition of the British poets which was issued by Anderson.” (DNB)

 

Wing L-3449; Gordon Lucretius 311c; O’Donnell (Behn) # BB11; Keynes (Evelyn) P-258; T.C. II: 6; see Grolier W-P #237 for the first edition.

 

893F   Sir John          Suckling          1609-1642    Fragmenta Aurea. A Collection of all The Incomparable Peeces, Written By Sir John Svckling. And published by a Friend to perpetuate his memory. Printed by his owne Copies.           London: Printed for Humphrey Moseley, and are to be sold at his shop, at the Signe of the Princes Armes in St Pauls Churchyard, 1646   5,500  Octavo            7 x 4.75 inches          A4, A6, B-G8, H4.        First edition.                       This is a very large copy, with many deckle edges throughout. The leaves are large and clean, with a crisp type impression. They have not been washed or pressed. It is bound in comenmporary full calf, housed ia a custom made solander case.            This copy has the words ‘Fragmenta Aurea’ with the ‘F’ and ‘A’ capitalized, the rest in small letters. Some copies of the first edition have ‘Fragmenta Aurea’ in all caps.This volume is divided into four parts, each with a separate title-page and pagination. The first contains a medley of poems and songs, a number of letters, and an essay on religion; the other three are plays, “Aglaura,” “The Goblins,” and “The Tragedy of Brennoralt.” At his best, Suckling writes with considerable charm; the song which begins, “Why so pale and wan fond lover” has a permanent place in the language of courtship. There is also a short “supplement” to Shakespeare”s Lucrece.

“Sir John Suckling, a Cavalier poet, Suckling’s short life was so crowded with activity that the amount of his literary output is remarkable. The son of an old Norfolk family, he seems to have taken his education none too seriously: he left Cambridge without graduating and spent a year at Gray’s Inn. His father died when Suckling was 18, and this gave him freedom to seek what adventures he pleased. He was a member of the expedition to the Ile de Re (1627), was in the Netherlands (1629-30), and served under Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden (1631-32). He was knighted in 1630. “A staunch Royalist, Suckling took up arms on the king’s behalf in 1639 and 1640 and is believed to have been active in a plot to free the Earl of Strafford from the Tower. It was to the Parliamentary party’s advantage to make a ‘plot’ of the affair and Suckling fled to Paris, where he died in the following year—by his own hand according to John Aubrey.     “Suckling was the author of three plays—Aglaura, The Goblins, and Brennoralt—which have never been revived but which contain some good lyrics, notably ‘Why so pale and wan, fond lover?’ His best work, indeed, is in the form of short pieces, occasional verses and songs, and in the delightful ‘A Ballad upon a Wedding.’ His expression is direct and robust, reflecting to some degree his lively, pleasure-loving, and tragically short life. His first published collection was A session of the Poets (1637). Fragmenta Aurea. A Collection of all the Incomparable Pieces, written by Sir John Suckling. And published by a Friend to perpetuate his memory appeared posthumously (1646).” (quoted from Stapleton’s Cambridge Guide to English Literature)               Wing S-6126; Pforzheimer 996; Hayward 84; Greg, III, 1130- 1; Studies in Bibliography, L. A. Beaurline and T. Clayton, “Notes on Early Editions of Fragmenta Aurea,” Studies in Bibliography 23 (1970), pp. 165-170; Wither to Prior 827; CBEL I, 1213; Folger, Printed Books 25:575.

 

807E   Robert            Wild    1609-1679

 

Iter Boreale, with large additions of several other poems, begin an exact colection of all hitherto extant. Never before published together.       

 

London: printed for the booksellers, 1668.           $4,800

Octavo 6 x 3 ½ inches          “The recantation of a penitent Proteus” and “The fair quarrel” with separate title-pages./ There are at least two editions of 1668. The present is misgauged and the first line of the imprint ends: Lon” Signatures: A-H8. Title within single rule border; head-pieces./ Leaves A1 and H8 are blank.

First Complete edition, Fourth edition overall .  This is the ‘Huth copy’ , It is bound in full modern morocco. a very tidy copy. The title-poem first appeared separately in 1660; a smaller collection that this one (1668)appeared in 1661, and was reprinted in 1665. Wild, a Puritan divine, met with popularity of his poetry rather disturbed such non-literary friends as Richard Baxter.  Included here are “The Norfolk and Wisbech Cock-Fight,” “Upon Some Bottles of Sack and Claret,” a satire on the political contortions of Nathaniel Lee, and a number of ballads and elegies. Not a particularly common book; the new edition of Wing does not locate copies in the British Library, Harvard, or Yale (though these have a variant, status undetermined, with 120 pp. of text, as opposed to 122 pp. here)

Wing W2136; Grolier 976; Hayward 121 ; CBEL II, 488.

 

Early Feminist writing…

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Susanna Centlivre     1667?-1723

The Gamester: A Comedy. As it is Acted at the New Theatre In Lincolns-Inn Fields By Her Majesty’s Servants. The Prologue Spoke by Mr. Betterton. Written by N. Rowe, Esq; The Third Edition.

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London: Printed for J. Knapton, in St. Paul’s Church-Yard, E. Curll at the Dial and the Bible, R. Gosling at the Mitre and Crown, both against St. Dunstan’s — Church in Fleetstreet, and A. Bettesworth on London-Bridge, 1714                                                    $1,950   

Duodecimo       6.3 x 3.75 inches       A4, B-D12, E2. 75 pages.   Third edition.             This copy has been recently rebound in full parchment over boards.

Susanna Centlivre was born Susanna Freeman and also known professionally as Susanna Carroll, was an English poet, actress, and

“the most successful female playwright of the eighteenth century”

DSC_0281“A sad lot were all these early feminine intruders into the field of letters, —Aphra Behn, Mrs. Manley, Mrs. Pilkington, and the rest. Mrs. Centlivre was the best of them. Almost the first of her sex to adopt literature as a calling, she may well be regarded as an unconscious reformer, the leader of a forlorn hope against that literary fortress which was so long defended by the cruel sneers of its masculine garrison. She fell upon the glacis. But over her body the Amazons have marched on to victory.” (H. A. Huntington, “Mrs. Centlivre,” Atlantic Monthly, 1882, vol. 49, page 764.

“[Centlivre’s] plays have a provoking spirit and volatile salt in them, which still preserves them, from decay. Congreve is said to have been jealous of their success at the time, and that it was one cause which drove him in disgust from the stage. If so, it was without any good reason, for these plays have great and intrinsic merit in them, which entitled them to their popularity, and besides, their merit was of a kind entirely different from his own.” (William Hazlitt, 1818, “Lectures on the English Comic Writers,” Lecture viii.

The original source for the plot line was Jean Francois Regnard’s “Le Joueur.” The prologue was written by Nicholas Rowe (1674-1718).     The dedication signed: S. Trotter, i.e. Susanna Centlivre.

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See  By Elisabeth J Heard   Experimentation on the English Stage, 1695-1708: ‪Routledge, ‪Sep 30, 2015 

ESTC T26857; NCBEL II, 781.

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147F         Titus Carus        Lucretius  95-52

B.C.  T.Lucretius Carus His Six Books Of Epicurean Philosophy, Done into English Verse, with Notes. The Third Edition. Demetri, Teq; Tigelli Discipulorum inter jubeo plorare Cathedras; i, Puer, atque meo citus hœc subscribe libello.   

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London: Printed for Thomas Sawbridge at the Three Flewer-de-luces in little Britain, and Anthony Stephens Bookseller near the Theatre in Oxford, 1683      $2800

Octavo, 7 1/4 x 4 3/4 inches (π1), A4, b-e4, f2, A-E4, (a)-(g)4, h2.         Third edition.

This copy is bound in original full calf its front joint is cracked at the foot, up to the second band, the rear joint is beginning to crack at either end, but it is completely sound and still quite appealing. The leaves are very clean and fresh, with deep impressions of the type.

This translation was prepared by Thomas Creech (1659-1700). The prefatory material contains DSC_0009commendatory poems by John Evelyn, Nahum Tate, Thomas Otway, and Aphra Behn {Her long poem (7 pages) To the unknown Daphnis appears here for the first time} among others, many of which were added after the first edition. Creech’s Lucretius first appeared in 1682, with certain portions of the text, notably those in the fourth book about the nature of love, left untranslated.

Both Pope and Evelyn praised the translation, and Dibdin says that the editor’s erudition, research, and correctness in this excellent and scarce work are acknowledged by every critic. The influence of Lucretius can be seen in Pope’s ‘Essay on Man.’ Lucretius was also favorite reading of Shelley, Wordsworth, and Tennyson.

“Creech’s translation of Lucretius vied in popularity with Dryden’s Virgil and Pope’s Homer. The son of one of his friends is reported to have said that the translation was made in Creech’s daily walk round the parks in Oxford in sets of fifty lines, which he would afterwards write down in his chamber and correct at leisure. […] When Dryden published his translations from Theocritus, Lucretius, and Horace, he disclaimed in the preface any intention of robbing Creech ‘of any part of that commendation which he has so justly acquired,’ and referred to his predecessor’s ‘excellent annotations, which I have often reprinted in the last century, and was included in the edition of the British poets which was issued by Anderson.” (DNB)          DSC_0010     Wing L-3448 Gordon: Lucretius 311c; O’Donnell (Behn) # BB11 ; Keynes (Evelyn) p.258; T.C. II: 6; see Grolier W-P #237 for the first edition.273F

453F         John Dryden     1631-1700

Lucretius a poem against the fear of death. With an ode in memory of the accomplish’d young lady Mrs. Ann Killigrew, excellent in the two sister arts of poetry and painting.

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London: H. Hills, 1709.      $980

Octavo      6 1/2 X 4 1/4 inches         Hills’s pirate edition .A8

First edition in this form            Price from imprint: Price One Penny. This copy is bound in full reversed calf.

Killigrew died of smallpox on June 16, 1685, when she was only 25 years old so the question has frequently been raised: is Killigrew so deserving of such an immortalizing Ode by Dryden? Had he even read her poetry to properly determine her skills? Some say Dryden defended all poets as teachers of moral truths, and therefore Killigrew, despite her lack of experience, deserved his praise. However, evidence shows that she might not have been ready to see some of her work published, such as the unfinished poem “Alexandreis,” about Alexander the Great. At the end of the poem, she expresses the feeling that the task was too great for her to take on and she would try to finish it at another time. Then, there is the question of the last three poems that were found among her papers. They seem to be in her handwriting, which is why Killigrew’s father added them to her book. The poems are about the despair the author has for another woman, and could possibly be autobiographical if they are in fact by Killigrew. Some of her other poems are about failed friendships, possibly with Katherine Philips or Anne Finch, so this assumption may have some validity.              Foxon, D458

English Short Title Catalog, ESTCT76294.

 

852F         Thomas Halyburton  Edited by Mrs. Janet Halyburton.       1674-1712

Memoirs of the life of the Reverend Mr. Thomas Halyburton. Professor of Divinity in the University of St. Andrews; digested into four parts, whereof the first three were written with his own hand some years before his death, and the fourth is collected from his diary by another hand; to which is annex’d some account of his dying words by those who were witnesses to his death.     

Edinburgh : printed by the heirs and successors of Andrew Anderson, 1715   1150         Octavo      4   6 1/4 in      [8], A O8, P2.     Second edition           Bound in early 19th century full leather with gilt trim and maroon leather title label.Contemporary ownership inscription of Archibald Craw on verso of title page and dated 1729.     This book is Edited by Halburton’s wife Janet Watson and Dedicated to Henretta Campbell.

Halyburton has been regarded as one of the most distinguished Scottish theologians. Hugh Martin described Halyburton and Cunningham as “the two greatest theologians that Scotland has ever produced”. John Duncan regarded him as “a minor John Owen” and classed his Memoirs with Augustine’s Confessions and Bunyan’s Grace Abounding. Obviously much indebted to the English Puritan, John Owen, Halyburton is more plain and popular in style. Among those beyond Scotland who benefited from and highly recommended the Memoirs and other published works of Halyburton are such significant (and varied) figures as George Whitefield and John Wesley, John Newton and Isaac Watts, and Archibald Alexander, first principal of the Princeton Theological Seminary.

Thomas Halyburton was born on December 25th 1674, the son of George Halyburton, minister of Aberdalgie and Dupplin in Perthshire until he was ejected from his charge in 1662 for his adherence to the Covenanted religion of Scotland. In 1676 George Halyburton was denounced by the Privy Council for keeping conventicles and was effectively silenced and in 1682 he died. Mrs. Halyburton and her two surviving children — her married daughter Janet and her son Thomas — fled to Rotterdam, to escape the persecution of the Covenanters. In the changed circumstances brought about by the Revolution, Thomas Halyburton was ordained and inducted to the ministry at Ceres in Fife in May of 1700. In April 1710 he became Professor of Divinity in the New College (St Mary’s), St Andrews. A struggle with ill health characterised most of his ministry and on September 23rd 1712 he died, leaving his wife with six surviving children. The impact of Halyburton’s sermons and theological writings is largely explained by the description given of him in the Preface to one edition of his The Great Concern of Salvation : “one that had the contents of the book written upon his own heart before he preached them to his people and was a living and lively witness and example of the great and grave truths now exhibited to public view”. Even his most technical and controversial work, Natural Religion Insufficient and Revealed Necessary to Man’s Happiness in his Present State, a refutation of Deism [which taught that all that needs to be known of God can be discovered by human reason in the light of nature without special revelation], found much of its impetus in his own spiritual struggle with the atheism of his carnal mind strengthened by Deistic reasonings and in his pastoral concern for others who might be subject to similar conflicts. His other major work, An Essay concerning the Nature of Faith; or, The Ground upon which Faith assents to the Scriptures, is an explanation of the apostle’s determination to preach in such a way “that your faith should not stand in the wisdom of men, but in the power of God” (1 Corinthians 2: 5). The English philosopher John Locke only accepted aspects of the Christian faith which were “above reason” on the basis of authority verified by reason. For him “reason must be our last judge and guide in everything”. Against Locke Halyburton contends that a God-given faith “looks only at the Lord’s authority…it leans only on the testimony of God, approving itself such to the souls of believers by its own glorious power, whereby, without borrowing help from any other signs, it evidences itself to be the Lord’s word, with a light so strong as carries the soul into an assent”.                 ESTC T148531, shows only one copy in the US

122F         Mary de la Rivière Manley        1663-1724

Secret memoirs and manners of several persons of quality of both sexes. From the New Atalantis, an island in the Mediteranean. 

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London: Printed for John Morphew, and J. Woodward, 1709    $4500

Octavo      7 1/2 X4 3/4 inches I. A4, B-Q8, R4.  Second edition.          This jewel of a book is DSC_0018expertly bound in antique style full paneled calf with a gilt spine. It is a lovely copy indeed.

The most important of the scandal chronicles of the early eighteenth century, a form made popular and practiced with considerable success by Mrs. Manley and Eliza Haywood.

Mrs. Manley was important in her day not only as a novelist, but as a Tory propagandist.

Her fiction “exhibited her taste for intrigue, and impudently slandered many persons of note, especially those of Whiggish proclivities.” – D.N.B. “Mrs. Manley’s scandalous ‘revelations’ appealed immediately to the prurient curiosity of her first audience ; but they continued to be read because they succeeded in providing certain satisfactions fundamental to fiction itself. In other words, the scandal novel or ‘chronicle’ of Mrs. Manley and Mrs. Haywood was a successful form, a tested commercial pattern, because it presented an opportunity for its readers to participate vicariously in an erotically exciting and glittering fantasy world of aristocratic corruption and promiscuity.” – Richetti, Popular Fiction before Richardson.

The story concerns the return to earth of the goddess of justice, Astrea, to gather information about private and public behavior on the island of Atalantis. Delarivier Manley drew on her own experiences as well as on an obsessive observation of her milieu to produce this fast-paced narrative of political and erotic intrigue.   New Atalantis (1709) is an early and influential example of satirical political writing by a woman. It was suppressed on the grounds of its scandalous nature and Manley (1663-1724) was arrested and tried.   Astrea [Justice] descends on the island of Atalantis, meets her mother Virtue, who tries to escape this world of »Interest« in which even the lovers have deserted her. Both visit Angela [London]. Lady Intelligence comments on all stories of interest. p.107: the sequel of »Histories« turns into the old type of satire with numerous scandals just being mentioned (e.g. short remarks on visitors of a horse race or coaches in the Prado [Hyde-Park]). The stories are leveled against leading Whig politicians – they seduce and ruin women. Yet detailed analysis of situations and considerations on actions which could be taken by potential victims. Even the weakest female victims get their chances to win (and gain decent marriages) the more desperate we are about strategic mistakes and a loss of virtue which prevents the heroines from taking the necessary steps. The stories have been praised for their »warmth« and breathtaking turns.

Manley was taken into custody nine days after the publication of the second volume of Secret Memories and Manners of several Persons of Quality of Both Sexes, from the New Atalantis, an island in the Mediterranean on 29 October 1709. Manley apparently surrendered herself after a secretary John Morphew and John Woodward and printer John Barber had been detained. Four days later the latter were discharged, but Manley remained in custody until 5 November when she was released on bail. After several continuations of the case, she was tried and discharged on 13 February 1710. Rivella provides the only account of the case itself in which Manley claims she defended herself on grounds that her information came by ‘inspiration’ and rebuked her judges for bringing ‘w woman to her trial for writing a few amorous trifles’ (pp. 110-11). This and the first volume which appeared in May 1709 were Romans a clef with separately printed keys. Each offered a succession of narratives of seduction and betrayal by notorious Whig grandees to Astrea, an allegorical figure of justice, by largely female narrators, including an allegorical figure of Intelligence and a midwife. In Rivella, Manley claims that her trial led her to conclude that ‘politics is not the business of a woman’ (p. 112) and that thereafter she turned exclusively to stories of love.

Delarivier Manley was in her day as well-known and potent a political satirist as her friend and co-editor Jonathan Swift. A fervent Tory, Manley skilfully interweaves sexual and political allegory in the tradition of the roman a clef in an acerbic vilification of her Whig opponents. The book’s publication in 1709 – fittingly the year of the collapse of the Whig ministry – caused a scandal which led to the arrest of the author, publisher and printer.

The book exposed the relationship of Queen Anne and one of her advisers, Sarah Churchill. Along with this, Manley’s piece examined the idea of female intimacy and its implications. The implications of female intimacy are important to Manley because of the many rumours of the influence that Churchill held over Queen Anne.                  ESTC T075114; McBurney 45a; Morgan 459.

 

684G         John Sheffield, Duke of Buckingham WITH   Wharton, Anne 1648-1720 and Anne Finch  (1661-1720) 

A Collection of Poems: Viz. The Temple of Death: By the Marquis of Normanby. An Epistle to the Earl of Dorset: By Charles Montague, Lord Halifax. The Duel of the Stags: By Sir Robert Howard. With Several Original Poems, Never before Printed, By The E. of Roscommon. The E. of Rochester. The E. Orrery. Sir Charles Sedley. } { Sir George Etherege. Mr. Granville. Mr. Stepney. Mr. Dryden, &c.     

DSC_0020London:Ralph Smith 1702                 $2250

Octavo      7 1/2 X 4 1/2 inches         A4, B-U8, W4, X-Z8; Aa-Ee8, Ff4.    Second edition.                  Bound in contemporary panelled calf, raised bands, rebackd, morocco label. a VG copy, being internally very crisp and clean .       A revised and enlarged edition of A Collection of Poems by Several Hands, published in 1693, this itself being an expansion of the first edition of 1672.

In this miscellany are seven Poems by  Anne Wharton .

Anne Wharton, née Lee (born 20 July 1659 at Ditchley Park, Oxfordshire, died 29 October 1685 at Adderbury, Oxfordshire)  She was the posthumous younger daughter of Sir Henry Lee, and a member of a wealthy family. Her mother died not long after her birth. She and her sister Eleanor were brought up at Adderbury House, where they lived with the mistress, mother and grandmother of its owner, the poet and libertine John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester, who was Anne Wharton’s uncle. In 1673 she married Thomas Wharton (1648–1715). She paid visits to Paris for her health in 1678 and 1680, as she suffered from eye troubles and convulsions, possibly linked to syphilis. Her husband soon neglected her and they had no children. After her death, Anne Wharton’s brother-in-law, Goodwin Wharton claimed in his autobiography that he had had an affair with her, and that she had had three other affairs – with Charles Mordaunt, 3rd Earl of Peterborough before her marriage (he bribed a servant to let him into the girl’s room at night) and with “Jack Howe” (probably the Whig politician John Grubham Howe, 1657–1722) in the 1680s – as well as being “lain with long by her uncle, my Lord Rochester.” Her letters to her husband from Paris seem devoted, but when visited her again in Paris, to obtain her signature on some documents to do with her £8000 estate, her ardour seems to have cooled. Anne Wharton’s death, in her sister Eleanor’s house at Adderbury in 1685, was very painful. The poet Robert Gould in an eclogue to the memory of Eleanor, who died in 1691, observes that hers was peaceful one by comparison:

“Think how her sister, dear ‘Urania’ [i. e. Anne], fell,

When ev’ry Arte’ry, Fibre, Nerve and Vein

Were by Convulsions torn, and fill’d with Pain…”[4]

 

A modern critical edition of 34 known works by Anne Wharton was published in 1997

Greer, Germaine; Hastings, Susan, eds. (1997). The Surviving Works of Anne Wharton. Saffron Walden: Stump Cross Books. p. not cited. ISBN 1-872029-25-6.

but at least eleven other poems have been discovered in manuscript since then.[9] Her “Elegy on the Earl of Rochester” appears in the New Oxford Book of Seventeenth-Century Verse (1991)

DSC_0024A Song

How hardly I concealed my Tears?

How oft did I complain?

When many tedious Days, my Fears

Told me I Loved in vain.

But now my Joys as wild are grown,

And hard to be concealed:

Sorrow may make a silent Moan,

But Joy will be revealed.

I tell it to the Bleating Flocks,

To every Stream and Tree,

And Bless the Hollow Murmuring Rocks

For Echoing back to me.

Thus you may see with how much Joy

We Want, we Wish, Believe;

‘Tis hard such Passion to Destroy,

But easy to Deceive.

Greer & Hastings, The Surviving Works of Anne Wharton, 1, 3, 4, 8, 9, 10(a), 20. 182.

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Also in this miscellany arms a Poem to Katherine Philips by Roscommon ” an Ode to Orinda”

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and an Anonymous “Prologue to Oroonoko”(by A Behn)

and Ann Finch’s  (1661-1720) The SPLEEN

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“The physical disability and psychological perturbations of melancholy were well known to one of the foremost women poets of the eighteenth century, Anne Finch, Countess of Winchilsea. As a victim of the malady, her description of its effects were firsthand and specific, with none of the generalities born of vague knowledge […] Lady Winchilsea begins her best-known poem on the subject, ‘The Spleen’ (1701), by describing the malady as ‘Proteus to abus’d Mankind.’ No one can find the cause of the affliction, she writes, nor can one ‘fix thee to remain in one continued Shape.’ By speaking of melancholy in these terms, Lady Winchilsea is echoing the sentiments of contemporary physicians who frequently compared the disease to Proteus, the shape-changing god of the sea, because its manifestations were always changing, continuously shifting from one part of the body to another, while constantly mimicking other diseases. Underlying its various forms, however, was the notion expounded by the Countess and contemporary physicians alike that melancholy was a mixed malady of body and mind, causing the sufferer physical pain and the psychological disorders of anxiety, grief, and fear without cause.” (Melancholy in Anne Finch and Elizabeth Carter, by John F. Sena) “‘Spleen’ is for Finch both triumph and failure. It is only once the spleen has affected the speaker that she describes her poetry as fallen, decayed failure. But, at the same time, the spleen allows her to assert that she does not wish to be a genteel woman artist, one who makes safe, insipid domestic arts or uncritically draws the monarch’s ‘undistinguish’d Face.’ ‘The Spleen’ returns to the overlap of political religious, and emotional failure in its closing lines with a description of Richard Lower, a physician to Charles II who supported the Whigs in the Popish Plot, sinking beneath the weight of the spleen.” (English Women’s Poetry, 1649-1714, by Carol Barash)

Also in this wonderful book are  among other poems …

The miscellany’s title-poem is a translation by the Earl of Mulgrave of Philippe Habert’s elegy ‘Le Temple de la Mort,’ in spite of the scorn expressed in the publisher’s preface for the French nation, and ‘the Servile way of following their Modes’. An essay on poetry, by J. Sheffield, 1st duke of Buckingham.–Horace: of the art of poetry, by Horatius Flaccus.–An essay on translated verse, by the earl of Roscommon.–Coopers hill, by J. Denham.–The duel of the stags, by R. Howard.–The temple of death, by P. Habert.–Macflecknoe, by J. Dryden; with Spencer’s ghost, by J. Oldham–Lecretius.–The plague of Ahtens (!) by T. Sprat.–The spleen, by A.K. Finch, contess of Winchilsea.–A letter from Italy, by J. Addison together with The mourning muse of Alexis, by W. Congreve.–The Kit-Cats, by R. Blackmore.–The campaign, by J. Addison.–Pastorals, by A. Philips.–Faction display’d, by W. Shippen.–Baucis and Philemon, by J. Swift; as also An ode upon, by W. Dillon, 4th earl of Roscommon.–Muscipula, by E. Holdsworth.            Case 151 (f); Greer & Hastings, The Surviving Works of Anne Wharton, 1, 3, 4, 8, 9, 10(a), 20. 182.   Prinz (Rochester) VII,21.*

 

 

767G         Katherine Philips       1631-1664

Letters from Orinda to Poliarchus

London: printed by W.B. for Bernard Lintott, 1705                $4,500

Octavo      6 3/4 X 3 3/4 inches         A-R8 First edition               This copy is bound in original full calf with a coat of arms stamped in gold on the boards,recently rebacked with new spine label.         This is a collection of 48 ( XLVIII) actual letters written by Philips to her patron Sir Charles Cotterell published several decades after her death, there is quit a bit of discussion of the literary culture of the seventh century in Britain. Including insite to Philips writing and reading habits. she often mentions books she is reading and plays which she is working on.

Philips was interested in the epistolary form, she founded the Society of Friendship in 1651 until 1661 was a semi-literary correspondence circle made up of mostly women, though men were also involved. The membership of this group, however, is somewhat questionable, because the authors took on pseudonyms from Classical literature (for example Katherine took on the name Orinda, in which the other members added on the accolade “Matchless.”) It is interesting to see the relations between the female members of the circle, especially Anne Owen, who is known in Philips’s poems as Lucasia. Half of Katherine’s poetry is dedicated to this woman. Anne and Katherine seem to have been lovers in an emotional, if not in a physical, sense for about ten years. Also significant as correspondents and lovers were Mary Awbrey (Rosania) and Elizabeth Boyle (Celimena). Elizabeth’s relationship with Katherine, however, was cut short by Philips’ death in 1664.

In “The Sapphic-Platonics of Katherine Philips, 1632-1664”   Harriette Andreadis

Source:Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 15, no. 1 (autumn 1989): 34-60.

Ms Andreadis, in this essay nicely gives a view of Orinda’s live (and Loves) in relation to her writing by using excerpts from her poems andThese letters;

Early Feminist writing…

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Susanna Centlivre     1667?-1723

The Gamester: A Comedy. As it is Acted at the New Theatre In Lincolns-Inn Fields By Her Majesty’s Servants. The Prologue Spoke by Mr. Betterton. Written by N. Rowe, Esq; The Third Edition.

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London: Printed for J. Knapton, in St. Paul’s Church-Yard, E. Curll at the Dial and the Bible, R. Gosling at the Mitre and Crown, both against St. Dunstan’s — Church in Fleetstreet, and A. Bettesworth on London-Bridge, 1714                                                    $1,950   

Duodecimo       6.3 x 3.75 inches       A4, B-D12, E2. 75 pages.   Third edition.             This copy has been recently rebound in full parchment over boards.

Susanna Centlivre was born Susanna Freeman and also known professionally as Susanna Carroll, was an English poet, actress, and

“the most successful female playwright of the eighteenth century”

DSC_0281“A sad lot were all these early feminine intruders into the field of letters, —Aphra Behn, Mrs. Manley, Mrs. Pilkington, and the rest. Mrs. Centlivre was the best of them. Almost the first of her sex to adopt literature as a calling, she may well be regarded as an unconscious reformer, the leader of a forlorn hope against that literary fortress which was so long defended by the cruel sneers of its masculine garrison. She fell upon the glacis. But over her body the Amazons have marched on to victory.” (H. A. Huntington, “Mrs. Centlivre,” Atlantic Monthly, 1882, vol. 49, page 764.

“[Centlivre’s] plays have a provoking spirit and volatile salt in them, which still preserves them, from decay. Congreve is said to have been jealous of their success at the time, and that it was one cause which drove him in disgust from the stage. If so, it was without any good reason, for these plays have great and intrinsic merit in them, which entitled them to their popularity, and besides, their merit was of a kind entirely different from his own.” (William Hazlitt, 1818, “Lectures on the English Comic Writers,” Lecture viii.

The original source for the plot line was Jean Francois Regnard’s “Le Joueur.” The prologue was written by Nicholas Rowe (1674-1718).     The dedication signed: S. Trotter, i.e. Susanna Centlivre.

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See  By Elisabeth J Heard   Experimentation on the English Stage, 1695-1708: ‪Routledge, ‪Sep 30, 2015 

ESTC T26857; NCBEL II, 781.

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147F         Titus Carus        Lucretius  95-52

B.C.  T.Lucretius Carus His Six Books Of Epicurean Philosophy, Done into English Verse, with Notes. The Third Edition. Demetri, Teq; Tigelli Discipulorum inter jubeo plorare Cathedras; i, Puer, atque meo citus hœc subscribe libello.   

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London: Printed for Thomas Sawbridge at the Three Flewer-de-luces in little Britain, and Anthony Stephens Bookseller near the Theatre in Oxford, 1683      $2800

Octavo, 7 1/4 x 4 3/4 inches (π1), A4, b-e4, f2, A-E4, (a)-(g)4, h2.         Third edition.

This copy is bound in original full calf its front joint is cracked at the foot, up to the second band, the rear joint is beginning to crack at either end, but it is completely sound and still quite appealing. The leaves are very clean and fresh, with deep impressions of the type.

This translation was prepared by Thomas Creech (1659-1700). The prefatory material contains DSC_0009commendatory poems by John Evelyn, Nahum Tate, Thomas Otway, and Aphra Behn {Her long poem (7 pages) To the unknown Daphnis appears here for the first time} among others, many of which were added after the first edition. Creech’s Lucretius first appeared in 1682, with certain portions of the text, notably those in the fourth book about the nature of love, left untranslated.

Both Pope and Evelyn praised the translation, and Dibdin says that the editor’s erudition, research, and correctness in this excellent and scarce work are acknowledged by every critic. The influence of Lucretius can be seen in Pope’s ‘Essay on Man.’ Lucretius was also favorite reading of Shelley, Wordsworth, and Tennyson.

“Creech’s translation of Lucretius vied in popularity with Dryden’s Virgil and Pope’s Homer. The son of one of his friends is reported to have said that the translation was made in Creech’s daily walk round the parks in Oxford in sets of fifty lines, which he would afterwards write down in his chamber and correct at leisure. […] When Dryden published his translations from Theocritus, Lucretius, and Horace, he disclaimed in the preface any intention of robbing Creech ‘of any part of that commendation which he has so justly acquired,’ and referred to his predecessor’s ‘excellent annotations, which I have often reprinted in the last century, and was included in the edition of the British poets which was issued by Anderson.” (DNB)          DSC_0010     Wing L-3448 Gordon: Lucretius 311c; O’Donnell (Behn) # BB11 ; Keynes (Evelyn) p.258; T.C. II: 6; see Grolier W-P #237 for the first edition.273F

453F         John Dryden     1631-1700

Lucretius a poem against the fear of death. With an ode in memory of the accomplish’d young lady Mrs. Ann Killigrew, excellent in the two sister arts of poetry and painting.

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London: H. Hills, 1709.      $980

Octavo      6 1/2 X 4 1/4 inches         Hills’s pirate edition .A8

First edition in this form            Price from imprint: Price One Penny. This copy is bound in full reversed calf.

Killigrew died of smallpox on June 16, 1685, when she was only 25 years old so the question has frequently been raised: is Killigrew so deserving of such an immortalizing Ode by Dryden? Had he even read her poetry to properly determine her skills? Some say Dryden defended all poets as teachers of moral truths, and therefore Killigrew, despite her lack of experience, deserved his praise. However, evidence shows that she might not have been ready to see some of her work published, such as the unfinished poem “Alexandreis,” about Alexander the Great. At the end of the poem, she expresses the feeling that the task was too great for her to take on and she would try to finish it at another time. Then, there is the question of the last three poems that were found among her papers. They seem to be in her handwriting, which is why Killigrew’s father added them to her book. The poems are about the despair the author has for another woman, and could possibly be autobiographical if they are in fact by Killigrew. Some of her other poems are about failed friendships, possibly with Katherine Philips or Anne Finch, so this assumption may have some validity.              Foxon, D458
English Short Title Catalog, ESTCT76294.

 

852F         Thomas Halyburton  Edited by Mrs. Janet Halyburton.       1674-1712

Memoirs of the life of the Reverend Mr. Thomas Halyburton. Professor of Divinity in the University of St. Andrews; digested into four parts, whereof the first three were written with his own hand some years before his death, and the fourth is collected from his diary by another hand; to which is annex’d some account of his dying words by those who were witnesses to his death.     

Edinburgh : printed by the heirs and successors of Andrew Anderson, 1715   1150         Octavo      4   6 1/4 in      [8], A O8, P2.     Second edition           Bound in early 19th century full leather with gilt trim and maroon leather title label.Contemporary ownership inscription of Archibald Craw on verso of title page and dated 1729.     This book is Edited by Halburton’s wife Janet Watson and Dedicated to Henretta Campbell.

Halyburton has been regarded as one of the most distinguished Scottish theologians. Hugh Martin described Halyburton and Cunningham as “the two greatest theologians that Scotland has ever produced”. John Duncan regarded him as “a minor John Owen” and classed his Memoirs with Augustine’s Confessions and Bunyan’s Grace Abounding. Obviously much indebted to the English Puritan, John Owen, Halyburton is more plain and popular in style. Among those beyond Scotland who benefited from and highly recommended the Memoirs and other published works of Halyburton are such significant (and varied) figures as George Whitefield and John Wesley, John Newton and Isaac Watts, and Archibald Alexander, first principal of the Princeton Theological Seminary.

Thomas Halyburton was born on December 25th 1674, the son of George Halyburton, minister of Aberdalgie and Dupplin in Perthshire until he was ejected from his charge in 1662 for his adherence to the Covenanted religion of Scotland. In 1676 George Halyburton was denounced by the Privy Council for keeping conventicles and was effectively silenced and in 1682 he died. Mrs. Halyburton and her two surviving children — her married daughter Janet and her son Thomas — fled to Rotterdam, to escape the persecution of the Covenanters. In the changed circumstances brought about by the Revolution, Thomas Halyburton was ordained and inducted to the ministry at Ceres in Fife in May of 1700. In April 1710 he became Professor of Divinity in the New College (St Mary’s), St Andrews. A struggle with ill health characterised most of his ministry and on September 23rd 1712 he died, leaving his wife with six surviving children. The impact of Halyburton’s sermons and theological writings is largely explained by the description given of him in the Preface to one edition of his The Great Concern of Salvation : “one that had the contents of the book written upon his own heart before he preached them to his people and was a living and lively witness and example of the great and grave truths now exhibited to public view”. Even his most technical and controversial work, Natural Religion Insufficient and Revealed Necessary to Man’s Happiness in his Present State, a refutation of Deism [which taught that all that needs to be known of God can be discovered by human reason in the light of nature without special revelation], found much of its impetus in his own spiritual struggle with the atheism of his carnal mind strengthened by Deistic reasonings and in his pastoral concern for others who might be subject to similar conflicts. His other major work, An Essay concerning the Nature of Faith; or, The Ground upon which Faith assents to the Scriptures, is an explanation of the apostle’s determination to preach in such a way “that your faith should not stand in the wisdom of men, but in the power of God” (1 Corinthians 2: 5). The English philosopher John Locke only accepted aspects of the Christian faith which were “above reason” on the basis of authority verified by reason. For him “reason must be our last judge and guide in everything”. Against Locke Halyburton contends that a God-given faith “looks only at the Lord’s authority…it leans only on the testimony of God, approving itself such to the souls of believers by its own glorious power, whereby, without borrowing help from any other signs, it evidences itself to be the Lord’s word, with a light so strong as carries the soul into an assent”.                 ESTC T148531, shows only one copy in the US

122F         Mary de la Rivière Manley        1663-1724

Secret memoirs and manners of several persons of quality of both sexes. From the New Atalantis, an island in the Mediteranean. 

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London: Printed for John Morphew, and J. Woodward, 1709    $4500

Octavo      7 1/2 X4 3/4 inches I. A4, B-Q8, R4.  Second edition.          This jewel of a book is DSC_0018expertly bound in antique style full paneled calf with a gilt spine. It is a lovely copy indeed.

The most important of the scandal chronicles of the early eighteenth century, a form made popular and practiced with considerable success by Mrs. Manley and Eliza Haywood.

Mrs. Manley was important in her day not only as a novelist, but as a Tory propagandist.

Her fiction “exhibited her taste for intrigue, and impudently slandered many persons of note, especially those of Whiggish proclivities.” – D.N.B. “Mrs. Manley’s scandalous ‘revelations’ appealed immediately to the prurient curiosity of her first audience ; but they continued to be read because they succeeded in providing certain satisfactions fundamental to fiction itself. In other words, the scandal novel or ‘chronicle’ of Mrs. Manley and Mrs. Haywood was a successful form, a tested commercial pattern, because it presented an opportunity for its readers to participate vicariously in an erotically exciting and glittering fantasy world of aristocratic corruption and promiscuity.” – Richetti, Popular Fiction before Richardson.

The story concerns the return to earth of the goddess of justice, Astrea, to gather information about private and public behavior on the island of Atalantis. Delarivier Manley drew on her own experiences as well as on an obsessive observation of her milieu to produce this fast-paced narrative of political and erotic intrigue.   New Atalantis (1709) is an early and influential example of satirical political writing by a woman. It was suppressed on the grounds of its scandalous nature and Manley (1663-1724) was arrested and tried.   Astrea [Justice] descends on the island of Atalantis, meets her mother Virtue, who tries to escape this world of »Interest« in which even the lovers have deserted her. Both visit Angela [London]. Lady Intelligence comments on all stories of interest. p.107: the sequel of »Histories« turns into the old type of satire with numerous scandals just being mentioned (e.g. short remarks on visitors of a horse race or coaches in the Prado [Hyde-Park]). The stories are leveled against leading Whig politicians – they seduce and ruin women. Yet detailed analysis of situations and considerations on actions which could be taken by potential victims. Even the weakest female victims get their chances to win (and gain decent marriages) the more desperate we are about strategic mistakes and a loss of virtue which prevents the heroines from taking the necessary steps. The stories have been praised for their »warmth« and breathtaking turns.

Manley was taken into custody nine days after the publication of the second volume of Secret Memories and Manners of several Persons of Quality of Both Sexes, from the New Atalantis, an island in the Mediterranean on 29 October 1709. Manley apparently surrendered herself after a secretary John Morphew and John Woodward and printer John Barber had been detained. Four days later the latter were discharged, but Manley remained in custody until 5 November when she was released on bail. After several continuations of the case, she was tried and discharged on 13 February 1710. Rivella provides the only account of the case itself in which Manley claims she defended herself on grounds that her information came by ‘inspiration’ and rebuked her judges for bringing ‘w woman to her trial for writing a few amorous trifles’ (pp. 110-11). This and the first volume which appeared in May 1709 were Romans a clef with separately printed keys. Each offered a succession of narratives of seduction and betrayal by notorious Whig grandees to Astrea, an allegorical figure of justice, by largely female narrators, including an allegorical figure of Intelligence and a midwife. In Rivella, Manley claims that her trial led her to conclude that ‘politics is not the business of a woman’ (p. 112) and that thereafter she turned exclusively to stories of love.

Delarivier Manley was in her day as well-known and potent a political satirist as her friend and co-editor Jonathan Swift. A fervent Tory, Manley skilfully interweaves sexual and political allegory in the tradition of the roman a clef in an acerbic vilification of her Whig opponents. The book’s publication in 1709 – fittingly the year of the collapse of the Whig ministry – caused a scandal which led to the arrest of the author, publisher and printer.
The book exposed the relationship of Queen Anne and one of her advisers, Sarah Churchill. Along with this, Manley’s piece examined the idea of female intimacy and its implications. The implications of female intimacy are important to Manley because of the many rumours of the influence that Churchill held over Queen Anne.                  ESTC T075114; McBurney 45a; Morgan 459.

 

684G         John Sheffield, Duke of Buckingham WITH   Wharton, Anne 1648-1720 and Anne Finch  (1661-1720) 

A Collection of Poems: Viz. The Temple of Death: By the Marquis of Normanby. An Epistle to the Earl of Dorset: By Charles Montague, Lord Halifax. The Duel of the Stags: By Sir Robert Howard. With Several Original Poems, Never before Printed, By The E. of Roscommon. The E. of Rochester. The E. Orrery. Sir Charles Sedley. } { Sir George Etherege. Mr. Granville. Mr. Stepney. Mr. Dryden, &c.     

DSC_0020London:Ralph Smith 1702                 $2250

Octavo      7 1/2 X 4 1/2 inches         A4, B-U8, W4, X-Z8; Aa-Ee8, Ff4.    Second edition.                  Bound in contemporary panelled calf, raised bands, rebackd, morocco label. a VG copy, being internally very crisp and clean .       A revised and enlarged edition of A Collection of Poems by Several Hands, published in 1693, this itself being an expansion of the first edition of 1672.

In this miscellany are seven Poems by  Anne Wharton .

Anne Wharton, née Lee (born 20 July 1659 at Ditchley Park, Oxfordshire, died 29 October 1685 at Adderbury, Oxfordshire)  She was the posthumous younger daughter of Sir Henry Lee, and a member of a wealthy family. Her mother died not long after her birth. She and her sister Eleanor were brought up at Adderbury House, where they lived with the mistress, mother and grandmother of its owner, the poet and libertine John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester, who was Anne Wharton’s uncle. In 1673 she married Thomas Wharton (1648–1715). She paid visits to Paris for her health in 1678 and 1680, as she suffered from eye troubles and convulsions, possibly linked to syphilis. Her husband soon neglected her and they had no children. After her death, Anne Wharton’s brother-in-law, Goodwin Wharton claimed in his autobiography that he had had an affair with her, and that she had had three other affairs – with Charles Mordaunt, 3rd Earl of Peterborough before her marriage (he bribed a servant to let him into the girl’s room at night) and with “Jack Howe” (probably the Whig politician John Grubham Howe, 1657–1722) in the 1680s – as well as being “lain with long by her uncle, my Lord Rochester.” Her letters to her husband from Paris seem devoted, but when visited her again in Paris, to obtain her signature on some documents to do with her £8000 estate, her ardour seems to have cooled. Anne Wharton’s death, in her sister Eleanor’s house at Adderbury in 1685, was very painful. The poet Robert Gould in an eclogue to the memory of Eleanor, who died in 1691, observes that hers was peaceful one by comparison:

“Think how her sister, dear ‘Urania’ [i. e. Anne], fell,
When ev’ry Arte’ry, Fibre, Nerve and Vein
Were by Convulsions torn, and fill’d with Pain…”[4]

 

A modern critical edition of 34 known works by Anne Wharton was published in 1997

Greer, Germaine; Hastings, Susan, eds. (1997). The Surviving Works of Anne Wharton. Saffron Walden: Stump Cross Books. p. not cited. ISBN 1-872029-25-6.

but at least eleven other poems have been discovered in manuscript since then.[9] Her “Elegy on the Earl of Rochester” appears in the New Oxford Book of Seventeenth-Century Verse (1991)

DSC_0024A Song
How hardly I concealed my Tears?
How oft did I complain?
When many tedious Days, my Fears
Told me I Loved in vain.

But now my Joys as wild are grown,
And hard to be concealed:
Sorrow may make a silent Moan,
But Joy will be revealed.

I tell it to the Bleating Flocks,
To every Stream and Tree,
And Bless the Hollow Murmuring Rocks
For Echoing back to me.

Thus you may see with how much Joy
We Want, we Wish, Believe;
‘Tis hard such Passion to Destroy,
But easy to Deceive.

Greer & Hastings, The Surviving Works of Anne Wharton, 1, 3, 4, 8, 9, 10(a), 20. 182.

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Also in this miscellany arms a Poem to Katherine Philips by Roscommon ” an Ode to Orinda”

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and an Anonymous “Prologue to Oroonoko”(by A Behn)

and Ann Finch’s  (1661-1720) The SPLEEN

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“The physical disability and psychological perturbations of melancholy were well known to one of the foremost women poets of the eighteenth century, Anne Finch, Countess of Winchilsea. As a victim of the malady, her description of its effects were firsthand and specific, with none of the generalities born of vague knowledge […] Lady Winchilsea begins her best-known poem on the subject, ‘The Spleen’ (1701), by describing the malady as ‘Proteus to abus’d Mankind.’ No one can find the cause of the affliction, she writes, nor can one ‘fix thee to remain in one continued Shape.’ By speaking of melancholy in these terms, Lady Winchilsea is echoing the sentiments of contemporary physicians who frequently compared the disease to Proteus, the shape-changing god of the sea, because its manifestations were always changing, continuously shifting from one part of the body to another, while constantly mimicking other diseases. Underlying its various forms, however, was the notion expounded by the Countess and contemporary physicians alike that melancholy was a mixed malady of body and mind, causing the sufferer physical pain and the psychological disorders of anxiety, grief, and fear without cause.” (Melancholy in Anne Finch and Elizabeth Carter, by John F. Sena) “‘Spleen’ is for Finch both triumph and failure. It is only once the spleen has affected the speaker that she describes her poetry as fallen, decayed failure. But, at the same time, the spleen allows her to assert that she does not wish to be a genteel woman artist, one who makes safe, insipid domestic arts or uncritically draws the monarch’s ‘undistinguish’d Face.’ ‘The Spleen’ returns to the overlap of political religious, and emotional failure in its closing lines with a description of Richard Lower, a physician to Charles II who supported the Whigs in the Popish Plot, sinking beneath the weight of the spleen.” (English Women’s Poetry, 1649-1714, by Carol Barash)

Also in this wonderful book are  among other poems …

The miscellany’s title-poem is a translation by the Earl of Mulgrave of Philippe Habert’s elegy ‘Le Temple de la Mort,’ in spite of the scorn expressed in the publisher’s preface for the French nation, and ‘the Servile way of following their Modes’. An essay on poetry, by J. Sheffield, 1st duke of Buckingham.–Horace: of the art of poetry, by Horatius Flaccus.–An essay on translated verse, by the earl of Roscommon.–Coopers hill, by J. Denham.–The duel of the stags, by R. Howard.–The temple of death, by P. Habert.–Macflecknoe, by J. Dryden; with Spencer’s ghost, by J. Oldham–Lecretius.–The plague of Ahtens (!) by T. Sprat.–The spleen, by A.K. Finch, contess of Winchilsea.–A letter from Italy, by J. Addison together with The mourning muse of Alexis, by W. Congreve.–The Kit-Cats, by R. Blackmore.–The campaign, by J. Addison.–Pastorals, by A. Philips.–Faction display’d, by W. Shippen.–Baucis and Philemon, by J. Swift; as also An ode upon, by W. Dillon, 4th earl of Roscommon.–Muscipula, by E. Holdsworth.            Case 151 (f); Greer & Hastings, The Surviving Works of Anne Wharton, 1, 3, 4, 8, 9, 10(a), 20. 182.   Prinz (Rochester) VII,21.*

 

 

767G         Katherine Philips       1631-1664

Letters from Orinda to Poliarchus

London: printed by W.B. for Bernard Lintott, 1705                $4,500

Octavo      6 3/4 X 3 3/4 inches         A-R8 First edition               This copy is bound in original full calf with a coat of arms stamped in gold on the boards,recently rebacked with new spine label.         This is a collection of 48 ( XLVIII) actual letters written by Philips to her patron Sir Charles Cotterell published several decades after her death, there is quit a bit of discussion of the literary culture of the seventh century in Britain. Including insite to Philips writing and reading habits. she often mentions books she is reading and plays which she is working on.

Philips was interested in the epistolary form, she founded the Society of Friendship in 1651 until 1661 was a semi-literary correspondence circle made up of mostly women, though men were also involved. The membership of this group, however, is somewhat questionable, because the authors took on pseudonyms from Classical literature (for example Katherine took on the name Orinda, in which the other members added on the accolade “Matchless.”) It is interesting to see the relations between the female members of the circle, especially Anne Owen, who is known in Philips’s poems as Lucasia. Half of Katherine’s poetry is dedicated to this woman. Anne and Katherine seem to have been lovers in an emotional, if not in a physical, sense for about ten years. Also significant as correspondents and lovers were Mary Awbrey (Rosania) and Elizabeth Boyle (Celimena). Elizabeth’s relationship with Katherine, however, was cut short by Philips’ death in 1664.

In “The Sapphic-Platonics of Katherine Philips, 1632-1664”   Harriette Andreadis

Source:Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 15, no. 1 (autumn 1989): 34-60.

Ms Andreadis, in this essay nicely gives a view of Orinda’s live (and Loves) in relation to her writing by using excerpts from her poems andThese letters;

Poems, &c. By John Donne

Donne, John. 1571/2-1631

Poems, &c. By John Donne, late Dean of St. Pauls. With Elegies On The Author’s Death. To which is added Divers Copies under his own hand, Never before Printed.

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London: In the Savoy, Printed by T.N. for Henry Herringman, 1669                $7,500

DSC_0278Octavo, 4.2 x 6.5 inches. Fifth edition. A4, B-Z8, Aa-Dd8. A1 and Dd8 are both blank and present in this copy. This copy is bound in contemporary full mottled calf. It has been sympathetically rebacked with raised bands and gilt title to spine.

This is the last and most complete edition of Donne’s poetry published in the seventeenth century, and the only Restoration printing. Many textual changes were made in this edition, and five new poems were added, including “To His Mistress Going to Bed,” and “O My America! My New-found-land.”

“The poetry of Donne represents a sharp break with that written by his predecessors and most of his contemporaries. Donne’s poetry, is written very largely in conceits— concentrated images which involve an element of dramatic contrast, of strain, or of intellectual difficulty. Donne, not only displays 
his own ingenuity; he may
 see into the nature of the
 world as deeply as the
philosopher. Donne’s
conceits in particular leap 
continually in a restless 
orbit from the personal to 
the cosmic and back
again.”

Wing D-1871; Keynes 84; Wither to Prior 291. 1:2

 

To His Mistress Going to Bed Related Poem Content Details

BY JOHN DONNE

Come, Madam, come, all rest my powers defy,

Until I labour, I in labour lie.

The foe oft-times having the foe in sight,

Is tir’d with standing though he never fight.

Off with that girdle, like heaven’s Zone glistering,

But a far fairer world encompassing.

Unpin that spangled breastplate which you wear,

That th’eyes of busy fools may be stopped there.

Unlace yourself, for that harmonious chime,

Tells me from you, that now it is bed time.

Off with that happy busk, which I envy,

That still can be, and still can stand so nigh.

Your gown going off, such beauteous state reveals,

As when from flowery meads th’hill’s shadow steals.

Off with that wiry Coronet and shew

The hairy Diadem which on you doth grow:

Now off with those shoes, and then safely tread

In this love’s hallow’d temple, this soft bed.

In such white robes, heaven’s Angels used to be

Received by men; Thou Angel bringst with thee

A heaven like Mahomet’s Paradise; and though

Ill spirits walk in white, we easily know,

By this these Angels from an evil sprite,

Those set our hairs, but these our flesh upright.

Licence my roving hands, and let them go,

Before, behind, between, above, below.

O my America! my new-found-land,

My kingdom, safeliest when with one man mann’d,

My Mine of precious stones, My Empirie,

How blest am I in this discovering thee!

To enter in these bonds, is to be free;

Then where my hand is set, my seal shall be.

Full nakedness! All joys are due to thee,

As souls unbodied, bodies uncloth’d must be,

To taste whole joys. Gems which you women use

Are like Atlanta’s balls, cast in men’s views,

That when a fool’s eye lighteth on a Gem,

His earthly soul may covet theirs, not them.

Like pictures, or like books’ gay coverings made

For lay-men, are all women thus array’d;

Themselves are mystic books, which only we

(Whom their imputed grace will dignify)

Must see reveal’d. Then since that I may know;

As liberally, as to a Midwife, shew

Thy self: cast all, yea, this white linen hence,

There is no penance due to innocence.

To teach thee, I am naked first; why then

What needst thou have more covering than a man.

The Works of Ben Jonson

683G Benjamin Jonson ca. 1572-1637

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The Works of Ben Jonson, which were formerly Printed in Two Volumes, are now Reprinted in One, to which is added a Comedy, called the New Inn, with Additions never before Published.

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London: Printed by Thomas Hodgkin, for H. Herringman, E. Brewster, T. Bassett, R. Chiswell, M. Wotton, G. Conyers, 1692                                                 $7,500

Folio 14 1/2 x 9 inches A6, B-Ll4, Oo-Bbb4, Ccc2, Eee-Zzz4, Aaaa-Zzzz4, Aaaaa4, Bbbbb6. “Dr. Greg called attention to the fact that sheet Ccc of this volume is invariably discolored. Besides that sheet, in all copies examined, sheet Zz2-3 is likewise foxed.” (Pforzheimer) Notably, these sheets are printed on paper which has a watermark not found elsewhere in the volume. The foxing is most likely due to the inferior quality of the paper, since all offending sheets share the same watermark.

First complete collected edition. This copy is bound in contemporary calf with a gilt stamp of initals under a correnet which has been rebacked. It is a very large and clean copy.

DSC_0270This edition, the last of the folio editions, of Ben Jonson’s works.  It is truly complete, containing all the masques; epigrams; plays; verse letters and panegyrics; sonnets; the English Grammar; Timber, or Discoveries; and the translation of Horace’s de Arte Poetica. The New Inne is included in this collected edition for the first time.

“Jonson’s life was tough and turbulent. After his father’s early death, Ben was adopted in infancy by a bricklayer and educated by the great classical scholar and antiquarian William Camden, before necessity drove him to enter the army. In Flanders, where the Dutch with English help were warring against the Spaniards, he fought single-handed with one of the enemy before the massed armies, and killed his man. Returning to England about 1595, he began to work as an actor and playwright but was drawn from one storm center to another. He killed a fellow actor in a duel, and escaped the gallows only by pleading ‘benefit of the clergy’ (i.e., by proving he could read and write, which entitled him to plead before a more lenient court). He was jailed for insulting the Scottish nation at a time when King James was newly arrived from Scotland. He took furious part in an intricate set of literary wars with his fellow playwrights. Having converted to Catholicism, he was the object of deep suspicion after the Gunpowder Plot of Guy Fawkes (1605), when the phobia against his religion reached its height. Yet he rode out all these troubles, growing mellower as he grew older, and in his latter years became the unofficial literary dictator of London, the king’s pensioned poet, a favorite around the court, and the good friend of men like Shakespeare, Donne, Francis Beaumont, John Selden, Francis Bacon, dukes, diplomats, and distinguished folk generally. In addition, he engaged the affection of younger men (poets like Robert Herrick, Thomas Carew, and Sir John Suckling, speculative thinkers like Lord Falkland and Sir Kenelm Digby), who delighted to christen themselves ‘sons of Ben.’ Sons of Ben provided the nucleus of the entire ‘Cavalier school’ of English poets.” (Norton Anthology of English Literature)

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Wing J-1006; Pforzheimer 561.

Conrad Gesner: Illustrated Inventories with the use of Wonderful Woodcuts

and why do I find this so interesting?

Guest post by Sophie Sterling, an M.Litt Art History student on placement in Special Collections researching Reformation-era illustrations in our early printed books Fear is exciting, the grim is fascinating. Nothing’s more fun than a cataclysmic bloodbath of Biblical proportions, and the Apocalypse of John delivers on all counts. The sea burns and becomes blood, all plant […]

via The Antichrist in Printed Art, 1500-1600 — University of Glasgow Library

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