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A discussion of interesting books from my current stock A WordPress.com site

“Truth consists of an adequation between the intellect and a thing”

930G Thomas Aquinas 1225-1274. editor Theodoricus de Susteren.

Summa de veritate celeberrimi doctoris s[an]cti Thome Aquinatis. que olim … me[n]dis scatebat. Nouissime iam per … magistru[m] nostru[m] Theodericum de Susteren co[n]uentus Coloniens[is] fratru[m] predicatoru[m] regentem … laboriose reuisa … feliciter incipit.

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930G Thomas Aquinas 1225-1274

Summa de veritate celeberrimi doctoris s[an]cti Thome Aquinatis. que olim … me[n]dis scatebat. Nouissime iam per … magistru[m] nostru[m] Theodericum de Susteren co[n]uentus Coloniens[is] fratru[m] predicatoru[m] regentem … laboriose reuisa … feliciter incipit.

Cologne : Heinrich Quentell, 7 Mar. 1499                                        $11,500

Folio 10 1/2 X 8 inches 2°: A-Z6,Aa-Gg6; {signature Dd signed De)   Third Edition/The final 15th century edition.

Blind-tooled front and back covers (including some blind-tooled letters), full calf on DSC_0122thick boards. Clasps missing, catchplates present. Foxing throughout, with some red and green ink dots along edges. Front pastedown shows slight signs of water damage. Occasional small red stains on text block (e.g. E3v and Q5), likely from the books’ rubricator, but otherwise a clean text block. “Summa de veritate celeberrimi doctoris sancti Thome Aquinatis…”First written around 1256, Thomas Aquinas’ “Disputed Questions on Truth” defends “the view that truth consists of an adequation between the intellect and a thing… Most importantly, he develops a notion of truth of being (what might be called “ontological truth”) along with truth of the intellect (what might be called “logical truth”)” (Wippel, 295)

DSC_0126Sections include: Truth; God’s Knowledge; Ideas; The Divine Word; Providence; Predestination; The Book of Life; The Knowledge of Angels; The Communication of Angelic Knowledge; The Mind; The Teacher; Prophecy; Rapture; Faith; Higher and Lower Reason; Synderesis; Conscience; The Knowledge of the First Man in the State of Innocence; Knowledge of the Soul After Death; The Knowledge of Christ; Good; The Tendency to Good and the Will; God’s Will; Free Choice; Sensuality; The Passions of the Soul; Grace; The Justification of Sinners; and The Grace of Christ.

For each topic, Aquinas reviews the topic’s Difficulties, and then responses with ‘To the Contrary’ and ‘Reply’. Aquinas concludes each topic with an “Answers to Difficulties” section, demonstrating his typical insightful worldview and readable literary style.“Everything is a being essentially. But a creature is good not essentially but by participation. Good, therefore, really adds something to being (“Good” [U1v]

translation from   http://dhspriory.org/thomas/QDdeVer21.htm).

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Goff T181;(Columbia University, Union Theological Seminary;HEHL; LC ;Massachusetts Historical Society;YUL)  ;  BMC I, 289/90; Only one Copy in The British Isles (BL)

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Impressa Agrippine. opera atq[ue] impe[n]sis p[ro]uidi viri Henrici Quentell. ciuis eiusdem. Anno salutis humane nonagesimonono supra millesimumquadringentesimu[m] Ipso die celebritatis autoris cursu felici ad finem vsq[ue] perducta.

 

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Three Sixteenth Century English Books.

850G Hugh Latimer 1485-1555

The fyrste Sermon of Mayster Hughe Latimer, whiche he preached before the kynges Maiest. wythin his graces palayce at Westminster M. D. XLIX. the viii. of Marche. (,’,) Cu gratia et Privilegio ad imprimendum solum.

[bound with]

The seconde Sermon of Maister Hughe Latimer, whych he preached before the Kynges maiestie, iv in his graces Palayce at Westminister y. xv. day of Marche. M. ccccc.xlix. Cum gratia et Privilegio ad Imprimendum solum.

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[London: by Jhon Day, dwellynge at Aldergate, and Wylliam Seres, dwellyng in Peter Colledge, 1549]                          $14,000

Octavo 137 x 88 mm A-D8, A-Y8, Aa-Ee8 (Lacking Ee7 and 8, probably blank.)  First editions, each of the two works is one of three or four undated variants, attributed to the year 1549.

This copy is bound in nineteenth century calfskin, the hinges starting to crack. The Encyclopedia Britannica calls Hugh Latimer’s sermons, “classics of their kind. Vivid, racy, terse in expression; profound in religious feeling, sagacious in their advice on human conduct. To the historical student they are of great value as a mirror of the social and political life of the period.”“All things which are written, are written for our erudition and knowledge. All things that are written in God’s book, in the Bible book, in the book of the Holy Scripture, are written to be our doctrine.” (from Hugh Latimer’s Sermon of the Plow)“This was the first of Latimer’s famous Lenten sermons on the duty of restoring stolen goods which resulted in the receipt of considerable sums of ‘conscience money.’” (Phorzimer Catalogue)“The seven sermons which he preached before the king in the following Lent are a curious combination of moral fervor and political partisanship, eloquently denouncing a host of current abuses, and paying the warmest tribute to the government of Somerset.” (DNB)

STC 15270.7; STC 15274.7; Pforzheimer #581 and 582; McKerrow & Ferguson 64.

15270.7 Copies – Brit.Isles                                                                                                                                                          Aberdeen University Library

British Library

Cambridge University Trinity College

Oxford University Bodleian Library

Oxford University Wadham College

Copies – N.America                                                                                                                                                             Folger Shakespeare

Harvard University

University of Virginia

Yale University, Sterling Memorial

15274.7 Copies – Brit.Isles                                                                                                                                                               British Library

Cambridge University Corpus Christi College

Cambridge University Library

Oxford University Bodleian Library

Peterborough Cathedral Library

Copies – N.America

Folger Shakespeare

Harvard University

Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery

University of Illinois

University of Texas

 

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939G Erasmus Sarcerius 1501-1559

Commo[n]places of Scripture orderly and after a compendious forme of teaching, set forth with no lit[t]le laboure, to y great profit & help of all such studentes in Gods word as have not had longe exercise in the same, by the right excellent clerke Eras. Sarcerius. Translated into English by Rychard Taverner.

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London: Nycolas Hyll for Abraham Vele, 1553                                       $12,000

Octavo 5 1/2  x 3 3/4 inches  A-Y8.1156193_view_05

Second edition. Aside from its text and content, as an artifact, this book has its own story. The parchment guards folded around the end leaves are leaves from a Medieval hymnal. One can imagine the Latin service in the times before the Reformation. The end leaves themselves are paper printed with the Act of Uniformity of the common prayer book, which was legally enacted after Henry’s schism from Rome, in an effort to define Anglicanism in its infancy. Inside, marginal notes of a contemporary reader give us The binding too is complete, original, sixteenth century full English blind tooled calfskin over boards, perfectly intact. The materials of the binding themselves give silent testament to the turbulence of the day in sixteenth century England. “Erasmus Sarcerius, German Lutheran, born at Annaberg, 1501; died at Magdeburg, 1559. He was matriculated at Leipzig in 1522, but in 1524 seems to have migrated to Wittenberg, and in 1528 was a teacher at Lubeck and a firm supporter of Protestant tenets. He likewise taught in Graz, and apparently received his master’s degree at Vienna, but was forced to leave because of his religious convictions and in 1530 was matriculated at Rostock. Finally completing his studies, he was recalled to Lubeck, where he remained until 1536, when Count William of Nassau called him to Siegen as rector of the Latin school. In the following year he was appointed superintendent and chaplain to the count, and henceforth all his energies were devoted to the cause of Lutheranism. […] He also came into momentary contact with the English movement against the Roman Church, this being the occasion of his Loci aliquot communes et theologici (Frankfort, 1538); English translation, under the [above] title. As a distinguished theologian Sarcerius could boast that he had framed church orders for twenty-four counties. […] The course of events [circa 1562] lead him further and further away from Melanchthon, and at the colloquy of Worms in 1557 he was on the side of the Weimar theologians.” (Schaff-Herzog)“In [1532] Taverner appealed for help to Cromwell, to whom he was unknown, not daring, as he said, to ask for the king’s liberality without first communicating with Cromwell. Cromwell induced the Duke of Norfolk to promise him a small pension, and in 1533 Taverner was described as ‘last year master of Greek in Cambridge, and now Cromwell’s client.’ He also entered as a student at the Inner Temple, and probably with a view to Cromwell’s service, devoted himself to a study of law. In 1536 Cromwell secured his appointment as clerk of the privy seal, and in August 1537 he was enabled to marry. Meanwhile, Taverner, under Cromwell’s direction, was actively engaged in producing works designed to encourage the reformation of England. […] [In the year before Taverner produced his translation of the Bible, the first edition of the current work was published.] In 1539 appeared Taverner’s English version of the Bible. […] The fall of Cromwell put a stop to Taverner’s literary activity and endangered his position. […] Taverner retained his position as clerk of the signet throughout Edward VI’s reign. On 13 May 1552, though a layman, he was licensed to preach, and he is said to have frequently officiated in this capacity before Edward VI. On Mary’s accession, he lost his place in the signet office, but lived unmolested at his house at Norbiton, Surrey, through the reign. He is also said to have been in the habit of preaching in the streets and catechizing children on religious topics. He died at Wood Eaton on 14 July 1575, and was buried with some ceremony in the chancel of the church.” (DNB)

STC 21755a.5

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932G Saint Augustine 354-430

Certaine select Prayers gathered out of S. Augustines Meditations, whiche he calleth his selfe Talke with God.[with] S. Avgvstines Manuell, or little Booke of the Contemplation of Christ, or of Gods worde,wherby the remembraunce of the heauenly desires which is falne a slepe may be quickned vp againe.

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London: Printed by Iohn Day dwelling ouer Aldersgate, 1575          $11,000

Octavo 139 x 90 mm A-S8, T4. Second edition. The first title-page is a bit browned and worn. It has been mounted. The following three leaves have very old minor, marginal paper repairs. One affects the woodcut border at the fore edge with some loss of the woodcut, which has been drawn in pencil. One text leaf has a minor paper repair in the blank margin at the foot of one leaf. The corner of one other page was folded up when 1156124_view 09_09 2the book was printed. This is a minor fault, which is really rather interesting. The leaf in question is K6. What first draws the eye is a little tear and a blank spot. The leaf was evidently torn and folded over at the exact moment of printing. This copy is bound in eighteenth century red morocco, tooled elaborately in gilt on both boards. It was rebacked somewhat recently in red leather, and tooled in gilt. On the front board the owner’s name, “A. Bunbury,” is tooled in gilt. The corners of the boards have been repaired. The edges of the leaves are gilt. The end-papers are embossed in red and gilt, the gilding has tarnished somewhat. Overall this is a very nice copy, in good condition, with an attractive binding. This selection of extracts from Saint 1156124_view 05_05 2Augustine’s Meditations contains two separate title-pages, although the collation is continuous, and the two together are considered a single work. It is a hand-sized devotional work, meant for pious reflection and inspiration, produced in the midst of the Elizabethan Reformation in England. As the Puritans in Parliament and the Queen wrestled over the details of the official church doctrine and the rights of non-Anglicans, English Catholics suffered with their own private dilemmas. In 1571 Parliament passed the Subscription Act, ordering that all clergy ordained under Henry VIII or Mary I, and any new ordinand or appointee to a benefice, should swear obedience to the Thirty-Nine Articles. In 1572 the Puritans attempted to introduce a bill into Parliament which would permit individual congregations to amend the Book of Common Prayer as they saw fit and which would enforce the Act of Uniformity only against Catholics. Elizabeth insisted on its withdrawal. In 1574 the first Catholic missionary priests arrived from Douai and Rheims to establish contact with Catholic families. The works of Augustine, and other Saints common to Protestants and Catholics could be published without controversy, and provide solace to all in this difficult time.

STC 925.

Copies – Brit.Isles                                                                                                                                                              British Library

Cardiff Central Library

Cardiff University

Oxford University Bodleian Library

Oxford University Bodleian Library

Oxford University Bodleian Library (includes The Vicar’s Library, ST. Mary’s Church, Marlborough)

St. Edmund’s College

Copies – N.America  

Folger Shakespeare

Henry E. Huntington Library

Pierpont Morgan Library

University of Illinois

Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

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The test oath (1672,1678) (Also known as the DECLARATION OF ATTESTATION OATH.)

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ad1)  Abraham Woodhead, R. H., 1609D1678.DSC_0028

ad2) Atterbury, Francis, 1662D1732

ad3) Tullie, George, 1652?D1695.

ad4) Anonymous. By Samuel Parker.

ad5)Anonymous. By William Wake.

ad6)Ashwell, George, 1612D1695.

ad7) Anonymous. (but By James Harrington.)

1) Two discourses. The first, concerning the spirit of Martin Luther, and the original of the Reformation· The second, concerning the celibacy of the clergy·

           bound with

2) An answer to some considerations on the spirit of Martin Luther and the original of the Reformation; lately printed atOxford

           bound with

3) An answer to a discourse concerning the celibacy of the clergy, printed at Oxford

      bound with

4) Reasons for abrogating the test, imposed upon all members of Parliament anno 1678. Octob. 30. In these words, I A.B. do solemnly and sincerely, in the presence of God, profess, testifie, and declare, that I do believe that in the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper there is not any transubstantiation of the elements of bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ, at, or after the consecration thereof by any person whatsoever; and that the invocation or adoration of the Virgin Mary, or any other Saint, and the sacrifice of the Mass, as they are now used in the Church of Rome, are superstitious and idolatrous. First written for the author’s own satisfaction; and now published for the benefit of all others whom it may concern

          bound with

5) A discourse concerning the nature of idolatry: in which a late author’s true and onely notion of idolatry is considered and confuted.

         bound with

6) De ecclesia Romana dissertatio. Pars operis multo majoris de judice controversiarum et Catholicæ veritatis regula. Autore Georgio Ashwello S.S.T.B. ecclesiæ Anglicanæ Presbytero, Coll. Wadhami in Acad. Oxon. olim Socio.

          bound with

7) Some reflexions upon a treatise call’d Pietas Romana & Parisiensis lately printed at Oxford. To which are added I. A vindication of Protestant charity, in answer to some passages in Mr. E.M.’s Remarks on a late conference. II. A defence of the Oxford reply to two discourse there printed. A.D. 1687

ad1) Printed at Oxford : [s.n.]. ad2)Oxford : printed at the Theater, Anno 1687. ad3)Oxford printed at the Theater, for Richard Chiswell at the Rose and Crown in S. Pauls Church Yard, London 1688. ad4) London printed for Henry Bonwicke, at the Red Lyon in St. Paul’s ChurchDYard 1688. ad5)London : printed for William Rogers, at the Sun over against St. Dunstan’s Church in FleetDstreet, MDCLXXXVIII. [1688]. ad6) Oxoniæ : e Theatro Sheldoniano, an. Do. M. DC. LXXXVIII. [1688] ad7) Oxford: printed at the Theater 1688.

$4500

Quarto 9 X 7 inches .  All seven books are First editions. This copy is bound in full contemporary calf, the front hinge has an early repair, all collated and complete.

This collection of seven small books Bound together all deal with The test oath (1672, 1678) (Also known as the DECLARATION OF ATTESTATION OATH.)

The first Parliament after the Restoration revived the priority of Supremacy and priority which were taken on 14 July, 1660. The Catholics in England being at first in some favour managed, as a rule, to escape taking it. After the conversion of James, then Duke of York, the jealousy of the Protestant party increased, and in 1672 The Test Act was carried by Shaftesbury, which compelled all holders of office under the Crown to make a short “Declaration against Transubstantiation”, viz., to swear that:

“there is not any transubstantiation in the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper, . . . at or after the consecration thereof by any person whatsoever”

This test was effective: James resigned his post of Lord High Admiral. But when the country and the Parliament had gone mad over Oates’s plot, 1678,( See page nine for a description of this) a much longer and more insulting test was devised, which added a further clause that “The invocation of the virgin Mary, or any Saint and the Sacrifice of the Mass . . . are superstitious and idolatrous . . . and that I make this declaration without any evasion, equivocation, or mental reservation whatsoever, and without any dispensation already granted me by the pope. On the death of Charles, James II succeeded, and he would no doubt have gladly abolished the antiDCatholic oaths altogether. But he never had the opportunity of bringing the project before Parliament. The Test was the subject of constant discussion, And here in this collection of bound books we have more than two sides of the debate, for its form and scope had been expressly intended to hamper a reform such as James was instituting. He freed himself, however, more or less from it by the Dispensing Power, especially after the declaration of the judges, June, 1686, that it was contrary to the principles of the constitution to prevent the Crown from using the services of any of its subjects when they were needed.

 

The first work bound here is by Woodhead whom Dr. Whitby pronounces “the most ingenious and solid writer of the Roman (catholic) party,” and who merits some notice from his name occurring so frequently in the popish controversy at the latter end of the seventeenth century , The attempt of James II to force his creed upon an unwilling university called forth many champions of the faith, and among others the able young tutor of Christ Church. In “Two Discourses,” Abraham Woodhead, launches an attack upon the Reformation in the person of Martin Luther who he acuses ofd numerous ‘failings’ and extrapolates these failings to be the cause foir the invalidity of the Reformation in whole. . In reply to this Atterbury published (1687) ‘An Answer to some Considerations on the Spirit of Martin Luther, and the Original of the Reformation,’ which Bishop Burnet pronounces to be one of the ablest of the many vindications of the church of England ‘. His Answer to the Discourse on celibacy of the Clergy is also an admirable defence. Biound next is Samuel Parkers’s Reason for Abrogating, which at the time he published it was Bishop of Oxford, but because of the consillatory nature of the book he was rumord to be a Roman Catholic. After this is Parkers Discourse concerning Idolartry, in which Parker hopes to convert Papists,. Is an interesting history of Idols and Idolatry . Next we Have the only published part of George Ashwell’s “De judice controversiarum et catholicae veritatis regula “ which supports the AngloDCatholic positions. And finally to wrap things up is Harrington’s Some Reflections which is a quite spirited defense of the Church of England against the “Church of Rome”

Wing: W 3460, A4146, T3235, P467A, W239, A3994, H834.

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Claude-François Menestrier: Iconologia to Semiotics! or אין כל חדש תחת השמש

If we begin with “aliquid stat pro aliquo”

(something stands for something)

{in the} Begining from the simple is dangerous and ultimately threatening endeavor, yet this is the human path, not in any way short of interrogating human understanding, (contemplating Aristotle’s theory of light and colour, which is found in two of Aristotle’s works: On the Soul and Sense and Sensibilia) how we transform the gap between thought and expression , can spring forth from Parmenides and Heidegger takes the ideas that “Being Is,” that “all is One,”, and beyond those to the thought that “Being and thinking are the same.” Therefore, Menestrier in his two books, discussed here ,and offered here, is challenging those kidnappers of existence (Descartes Maybe?) with a Proof of Life?  Heraclitus, tells us  “Being Becomes,” because “all is flux.” And all our thinking about meaning is a face-to-face attempt to position ourselves with(in) our experience of/with the moving perceptions of the world around us. ( and to share? impose? it upon our fellow-man)

And since yesterday was Blooms Day, I quote Joyce

“INELUCTABLE MODALITY OF THE VISIBLE: AT LEAST THAT IF NO MORE, thought through my eyes. Signatures of all things I am here to read, seaspawn and seawrack, the nearing tide, that rusty boot. Snotgreen, bluesilver, rust: coloured signs. Limits of the diaphane. But he adds: in bodies. Then he was aware of them bodies before of them coloured. How? By knocking his sconce against them, sure. Go easy. Bald he was and a millionaire, maestro di color che sanno. Limit of the diaphane in. Why in? Diaphane, adiaphane. If you can put your five fingers through it, it is a gate, if not a door. Shut your eyes and see.”

So here Joyce is Making Stephen Dedalus  a/the ” Protæn shape Shifter Modulating his reality between the oblivion of apocalypse and simple Aristotelian  empiricism>.

This is How I read The Jesuit Claude-François Menestrier’s, two books here.

 

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950G Claude-François Menestrier 1631-1705

L’art des emblemes. Par le P.C. François Menestrier, de la Compagnie de Jesus

A Lyon : Chez Benoist Coral, ruë Merciere, à l’Enseigne de la Victoire,1662 $2900

Octavo A4, A-G8, H-O4.  First Edition.    This copy is bound in full contemporary speckled calf with gilt spine in very good shape with only a little wear on the head cap and corners.

As Alison Saunders has demonstrated, it is with Menestrier that the emblem comes into its own as a form worthy of its own full treatise, whereas in earlier theoretical writings it was discussed in the broader context of devices, and the main interest of the writers lay in establishing the differences between emblem and device (Alison Saunders, The Seventeenth-Century French Emblem [Geneva, 2000], pp. 332-333).

Menestrier gives a very detailed exposition of his understanding of the emblem, and its function as a didactic tool.   Above all, it is the didactic nature of emblems that Menestrier emphasizes, describing the way in which their pleasing combination of word and image is exploited towards a moralizing end. While acknowledging Alciati’s pioneering role as creator of the emblem in its modern form, Menestrier insists on the great antiquity of the genre, stating that “Emblems are as ancient as the world, in that the world is, so to speak, an Emblem of the Divine,” substantiating this statement by citing the authority of St. Paul, “who taught that the things that Man sees are the images and figures representing the wisdom and power of Him who made them” (“S. Paul, qui nous apprend que les choses que nous voyons,sont à l’homme autant d’images & de figures sensibles qui luy representent la sagesse aussi bien que la puissance de celuy qui les a faites” This volume containins  ten leaves of illustrations     (D. Graham, Claude-François Menestrier: The Founder of ‘Early Modern Grounded Theory’, in W. de Boer, K.A.E. Enenkel & W.S. Melion [edd.], Jesuit Image Theory, Leiden, 2016, p. 120) Allut XXIII ; Renard XXV ; Sommervogel V 910, 25 ; Praz 422 ; Landwehr 513

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949G Claude-François Menestrier  1631-1705

La philosophie des images enigmatiques, ou il est traité des enigmes, hieroglyphiques, oracles, propheties, sorts, divinations, loteries, talismans, songes, centuries de Nostradamus, de la baguette.

 

A Lyon : Chez Jaques Guerrier …, M.DC.XCIV [1694]      $2200

Duodecimo â, A-X12 First Edition This copy is bound in full contemporary speckled calf with gilt spine in very good shape with only a little wear on the head cap and corners.

The author explains here the various kinds of enigmas, and establishes their characters, rules, and customs. He classifies these enigmas into three classes: permissible (like rebus and emblems), suspects (like palmistry), and condemned ones (like talismanic magic).
Ménestrier is one of the most brilliant representatives of a baroque culture at its peak in the middle of the 17th century.  He was a man of all talents, prodigious erudition, a prolific author of treatises on the coat of arms, emblems, medals, the philosophy of images, history, he was the theoretician, but also the director of all Forms of spectacle of his time, the inexhaustible designer of iconographic programs associating all the cultural legacies of France of Louis XIV.  A member of the Society of Jesus  and attendant of the royal court.

This  fascinating illustrated book of esoteric philosophy, contains rare illustrations and covers a range of topics such as puzzles, talismans, hieroglyphics, oracles, prophecies, divinations, dream interpretations, and spells and sorceries. Many of the topics discussed parallel the work of Nostradamus.
In this  vast oeuvre on symbolic images, which uses Aristotle’s Rhetoric, Poetics and Politics as well as Tesauro’s Cannocchiale Aristotelico as key references for an all-encompassing conceptualization of the visual, epitomized in his project of a philosophie des images, Ménestrier traces back all forms of knowledge such as art, philosophy, and theology to specific image practices.  A thorough examination of Ménestrier’s theoretical conception remains difficult to undertake due to the thematic disparity of his oeuvre as well as his casuistic and accumulative approach.  Hence, Ménestrier’s theoretical contribution to the performance culture of the Ancien Régime becomes fully visible only in a synopsis of scattered remarks.

Renard CXXIII.; Sommervogel V 935, 123; Caillet III 7376; Jouin et Descreux 535, 10; Landwehr, Romanic, 520; Praz t. II, 92; Chomarat 310; Yve-Plessis 1041949G Claude-

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Please see: David Graham in P. Bouissac, ed., Encyclopedia of Semiotics (see below), online version at http://psychology.jrank.org/pages/2003/emblem.html;

Levinas: Entre Nous: Essais sur le penser-à-l’autre. Paris, France: Éditions Bernard Grasset, Collection Figures, 1993

 

Conservation of a Renaissance masterpiece: Prolianus’s Astronomia

John Rylands Library Special Collections Blog

One of our most beautiful Renaissance manuscripts is a copy of Christianus Prolianus’s scientific treatise, Astronomia, produced in Naples in 1478. Many of its pages are decorated with exquisite white-vine borders, featuring putti, birds and butterflies. It has appeared in this blog before, when it was fully digitised in 2012.

Latin MS 53, f.1r (detail) Christianus Prolianus’s Astronomia, Latin MS 53, folio 1r (detail).

We are planning to include it in an exhibition at the John Rylands Library on ‘Colour’ next year. However, a routine condition report revealed significant problems, with many areas of flaking pigment or gold leaf. To prepare the manuscript for display, our Collection Care team therefore recently undertook a project to consolidate these areas. This technique involves applying tiny drops of isinglass solution beneath the loose fragments, using a very fine artist’s brush.

Isinglass comes from the swim bladder of the sturgeon fish. Dried isinglass is dissolved in warm…

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Melanchthon and the council of Mantua 1537 (Way too many words!)

Vrsachen so die Chur vnd Fürsten : auch Stende vnd Stedte, der Bekentnis, warhafftiger, Göttlicher, vnd Euangelischer Lahr, allen Königen, Hoheiten, vnd Potentaten der Christenheit, durch jr schreiben, zu erkennen gegeben, darümb sie Bapst Pauli, des namens des dritten, ausgeschrieben Concilium, das er auff den drey vnd zwentsigsten tag maij, schirftkünsstig, gegen Mantua angersatzt, billich vordechtig, auch zu gemeiner Christlichen Einigkeit, nicht dienstlich achten vnd halten.

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Wittenberg George Rhau,  $ SOLD

Quarto A-C4 D2 E4 (E4 blank)  First Edition This copy is disbound, sand sewn. Council of Mantua (1537)

BM, Germ. Books 353. Kuczynski 2671

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Melanchthon, the Quiet Reformer
Clyde Leonard Manschreck
Abingdon Press, 1958 –

 

 

POPE PAUL III WAS FAR FROM FEVERISH IN HIS DESIRE FOR a general council, but for political and economic reasons just two years after he ascended the papal chair he an nounced that he would convene a council in May of 1537 at Mantua.

The evangelicals had long pleaded for an impartial council, but in the pope’s summons they were prejudged as “heretics.” Realizing, however, that they would have to say why they would not attend such a council, the Protestants called for an assembly of all the Lutheran estates at Smalcald, February 7, to decide on a common course.

Luther was asked to formulate a statement expressing the evangeli cals’ attitude. Instead of revising the Augsburg Confession, he prepared new articles. When the Confession was written in 1530, a faint hope still lingered that the churches might become reconciled. Melanchthon, there fore, had emphasized agreement and had underplayed the points of dis sension. As the years passed, the Roman Catholics took advantage of Melanchthon’s “light-stepping” to pervert the underlying evangelical point of view.

By 1537 the irreconcilable differences between the two divisions of Christendom had become evident. Instead of making an indirect claim for toleration Luther felt impelled to show “open and uncompromising hostility to the hopelessly corrupt papacy.”   By arraigning the Roman church for the errors in which it had become hardened, Luther drew a sharp line between Catholicism and Protestantism. In doing so, he had the sanction of his colleagues. Before the new articles were sent to the

Elector they were approved by Melanchthon, Jonas, Cruciger, and Bugenhagen, as well as Amsdorf, Agricola, and Spalatin who had been summoned to Wittenberg.

By January 3, the Smalcald Articles, as they came to be called, were on their way to the Elector for perusal. Convinced of their truthfulness and basic agreement with the Augsburg Confession, he openly declared he would confess them in council and before the whole world, and would petition God to keep him, his relatives, and his subjects from vacillation.  The Smalcald credo was almost a declaration of war on the papacy. Part I stated the evangelical belief about the Trinity and the Incarna tion. Part II discussed redemption through Christ, and the abuses which originated through relics, pilgrimages, and like works. Part III set forth some doctrines the evangelicals were still willing to discuss. Actually, these were quite a few, but the antipapal note throughout the articles was unmistakable, for Luther spoke of the pope as Antichrist.

Toward the end of January, 1537, the Elector, Melanchthon, Luther, Spalatin, and Bugenhagen mounted horses and wagons bound for Smal cald. Forty theologians and almost as many civil rulers converged on the city. When the cold wintry blasts proved too much for Luther’s health, the Elector loaned him his personal wagon for the return home. As he went through the city gate, he shouted to Melanchthon,

“May God fill you with hate for the Pope!”

The brunt of the situation fell on Melanchthon, for in attendance at the meeting were Vorst, the papal nuncio, and Held, the vice-chancellor to the Emperor. As at so many previous meetings, there were threats and talk of war.  And as usual there were long, protocol-filled deliberations which consumed time and energy. It is not clear why the princes hesitated to accept Luther’s articles, but they did delay, and even asked Melanchthon to discover what articles of faith the evangelicals would sustain at all hazards. Melanchthon complained that attempts to compromise would lead to apprehension and disharmony.

When Luther’s articles were laid before the theologians, they signed, because they recognized the document as a powerful statement of their convictions. The princes, however, needed something else to present at Mantua, since it was generally conceded that the Protestants should not attend a council where they would be considered heretics.  When Melanchthon subscribed to Luther’s articles, he added:

I, Philip Melanchthon, regard the foregoing articles as right and Christian. But of the Pope I hold that if he will permit the Gospel, the government of the bishops which he now has from others, may be jure humano also conceded to him by us, for the sake of peace and the common tranquillity of those Christians, who are or may hereafter be under him.

This willingness to accept the pope’s control of bishops rested not simply on a desire for peace. Melanchthon saw in the human control of the pope a realistic solution to a situation which was neither black nor white. H e carefully qualified his statement so as to safeguard the gospel, which for him meant justification by faith. In the tractate which he penned a few days later, he did not hesitate to excoriate the papacy for its cor ruptness and to demonstrate that its claims to divine sanction were un bridled pretensions. Melanchthon knew that no one, be he pope or Luther, is absolutely right, that no human system is final or without flaws, that limited human beings always devise relative goods….

While still at Smalcald, Melanchthon, at the request of the princes, composed one of the sternest and ablest apologies for rejecting the papacy that has ever come out of Protestantism. With characteristic skill he refuted the papal claim of supremacy and asserted the right of churches everywhere “to ordain for themselves pastors and other church officers.” He forcefully brought out the grounds on which the proposed council had been refused. Using Luke 22 :25, John 20 :21, Gal. 2 :7 ff., I Cor. 3 :6, and similar passages, Melanchthon showed that Scripture does not place the pope by divine right above other pastors, and that some doctrines the evangelicals were still willing to discuss. Actually, these were quite a few, but the antipapal note throughout the articles was unmistakable, for Luther spoke of the pope as Antichrist.8

Melanchthon composed the essay in Latin and Veit Dietrich made the German translation that was signed by thirty-four ministers and theologians. It was just what the princes needed to accompany their rejection of the proposed general council. In the recess statement the princes expressly mentioned and approved the Augsburg Confession and the Apology and this new writing which was called the Appendix on the Papacy. The essay thus received an immediately symbolical authority among the evangelicals. For many years it superseded Luther’s articles which were privately published by Luther in 1538, 1543, and 1545.  By the time of the Book of Concord in 1580, Luther’s Smalcald Articles and Melanchthon’s essay had acquired solid symbolic authority.

After composing several other items for the princes on how to handle miscellaneous religious problems, and after requesting the princes to use the papal church and school properties which they had confiscated for Protestant religion and education, Melanchthon departed for home. He was worried about Luther’s health, wondering if Dr. Sturz of Erfurt had helped the pain of the stone, wondering if the prayers he so earnestly offered had been answered. At Weimar he rejoiced to see Luther, who had recovered considerably, and the two rode together to Wittenberg. He wrote to Agricola:

I was seized by a peculiar sorrow when I saw Luther’s danger. I was moved to itby the loss of the Church, but also by my love for this man, and my admiration of his distinguished and heroic virtues. I could not but be greatly troubled at the danger of such a man. Therefore, I heartily thank God and our Lord Jesus Christ, that he has looked upon our tears and sighs, and has restored Luther to health.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Truth consists of an adequation between the intellect and a thing”

930G Thomas Aquinas 1225-1274. editor Theodoricus de Susteren.

Summa de veritate celeberrimi doctoris s[an]cti Thome Aquinatis. que olim … me[n]dis scatebat. Nouissime iam per … magistru[m] nostru[m] Theodericum de Susteren co[n]uentus Coloniens[is] fratru[m] predicatoru[m] regentem … laboriose reuisa … feliciter incipit.

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930G Thomas Aquinas 1225-1274

Summa de veritate celeberrimi doctoris s[an]cti Thome Aquinatis. que olim … me[n]dis scatebat. Nouissime iam per … magistru[m] nostru[m] Theodericum de Susteren co[n]uentus Coloniens[is] fratru[m] predicatoru[m] regentem … laboriose reuisa … feliciter incipit.

Cologne : Heinrich Quentell, 7 Mar. 1499                                        $11,500

Folio 10 1/2 X 8 inches 2°: A-Z6,Aa-Gg6; {signature Dd signed De)   Third Edition/The final 15th century edition.

Blind-tooled front and back covers (including some blind-tooled letters), full calf on DSC_0122thick boards. Clasps missing, catchplates present. Foxing throughout, with some red and green ink dots along edges. Front pastedown shows slight signs of water damage. Occasional small red stains on text block (e.g. E3v and Q5), likely from the books’ rubricator, but otherwise a clean text block. “Summa de veritate celeberrimi doctoris sancti Thome Aquinatis…”First written around 1256, Thomas Aquinas’ “Disputed Questions on Truth” defends “the view that truth consists of an adequation between the intellect and a thing… Most importantly, he develops a notion of truth of being (what might be called “ontological truth”) along with truth of the intellect (what might be called “logical truth”)” (Wippel, 295)

DSC_0126Sections include: Truth; God’s Knowledge; Ideas; The Divine Word; Providence; Predestination; The Book of Life; The Knowledge of Angels; The Communication of Angelic Knowledge; The Mind; The Teacher; Prophecy; Rapture; Faith; Higher and Lower Reason; Synderesis; Conscience; The Knowledge of the First Man in the State of Innocence; Knowledge of the Soul After Death; The Knowledge of Christ; Good; The Tendency to Good and the Will; God’s Will; Free Choice; Sensuality; The Passions of the Soul; Grace; The Justification of Sinners; and The Grace of Christ.

For each topic, Aquinas reviews the topic’s Difficulties, and then responses with ‘To the Contrary’ and ‘Reply’. Aquinas concludes each topic with an “Answers to Difficulties” section, demonstrating his typical insightful worldview and readable literary style.“Everything is a being essentially. But a creature is good not essentially but by participation. Good, therefore, really adds something to being (“Good” [U1v]

translation from   http://dhspriory.org/thomas/QDdeVer21.htm).

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Goff T181;(Columbia University, Union Theological Seminary;HEHL; LC ;Massachusetts Historical Society;YUL)  ;  BMC I, 289/90; Only one Copy in The British Isles (BL)

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Impressa Agrippine. opera atq[ue] impe[n]sis p[ro]uidi viri Henrici Quentell. ciuis eiusdem. Anno salutis humane nonagesimonono supra millesimumquadringentesimu[m] Ipso die celebritatis autoris cursu felici ad finem vsq[ue] perducta.

 

Three Sixteenth Century English Books.

850G Hugh Latimer 1485-1555

The fyrste Sermon of Mayster Hughe Latimer, whiche he preached before the kynges Maiest. wythin his graces palayce at Westminster M. D. XLIX. the viii. of Marche. (,’,) Cu gratia et Privilegio ad imprimendum solum.

[bound with]

The seconde Sermon of Maister Hughe Latimer, whych he preached before the Kynges maiestie, iv in his graces Palayce at Westminister y. xv. day of Marche. M. ccccc.xlix. Cum gratia et Privilegio ad Imprimendum solum.

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[London: by Jhon Day, dwellynge at Aldergate, and Wylliam Seres, dwellyng in Peter Colledge, 1549]                          $14,000

Octavo 137 x 88 mm A-D8, A-Y8, Aa-Ee8 (Lacking Ee7 and 8, probably blank.)  First editions, each of the two works is one of three or four undated variants, attributed to the year 1549.

This copy is bound in nineteenth century calfskin, the hinges starting to crack. The Encyclopedia Britannica calls Hugh Latimer’s sermons, “classics of their kind. Vivid, racy, terse in expression; profound in religious feeling, sagacious in their advice on human conduct. To the historical student they are of great value as a mirror of the social and political life of the period.”“All things which are written, are written for our erudition and knowledge. All things that are written in God’s book, in the Bible book, in the book of the Holy Scripture, are written to be our doctrine.” (from Hugh Latimer’s Sermon of the Plow)“This was the first of Latimer’s famous Lenten sermons on the duty of restoring stolen goods which resulted in the receipt of considerable sums of ‘conscience money.’” (Phorzimer Catalogue)“The seven sermons which he preached before the king in the following Lent are a curious combination of moral fervor and political partisanship, eloquently denouncing a host of current abuses, and paying the warmest tribute to the government of Somerset.” (DNB)

STC 15270.7; STC 15274.7; Pforzheimer #581 and 582; McKerrow & Ferguson 64.

15270.7 Copies – Brit.Isles                                                                                                                                                          Aberdeen University Library
British Library
Cambridge University Trinity College
Oxford University Bodleian Library
Oxford University Wadham College
Copies – N.America                                                                                                                                                             Folger Shakespeare
Harvard University
University of Virginia
Yale University, Sterling Memorial
15274.7 Copies – Brit.Isles                                                                                                                                                               British Library
Cambridge University Corpus Christi College
Cambridge University Library
Oxford University Bodleian Library
Peterborough Cathedral Library
Copies – N.America
Folger Shakespeare
Harvard University
Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery
University of Illinois
University of Texas

 

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939G Erasmus Sarcerius 1501-1559

Commo[n]places of Scripture orderly and after a compendious forme of teaching, set forth with no lit[t]le laboure, to y great profit & help of all such studentes in Gods word as have not had longe exercise in the same, by the right excellent clerke Eras. Sarcerius. Translated into English by Rychard Taverner.

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London: Nycolas Hyll for Abraham Vele, 1553                                       $12,000

Octavo 5 1/2  x 3 3/4 inches  A-Y8.1156193_view_05

Second edition. Aside from its text and content, as an artifact, this book has its own story. The parchment guards folded around the end leaves are leaves from a Medieval hymnal. One can imagine the Latin service in the times before the Reformation. The end leaves themselves are paper printed with the Act of Uniformity of the common prayer book, which was legally enacted after Henry’s schism from Rome, in an effort to define Anglicanism in its infancy. Inside, marginal notes of a contemporary reader give us The binding too is complete, original, sixteenth century full English blind tooled calfskin over boards, perfectly intact. The materials of the binding themselves give silent testament to the turbulence of the day in sixteenth century England. “Erasmus Sarcerius, German Lutheran, born at Annaberg, 1501; died at Magdeburg, 1559. He was matriculated at Leipzig in 1522, but in 1524 seems to have migrated to Wittenberg, and in 1528 was a teacher at Lubeck and a firm supporter of Protestant tenets. He likewise taught in Graz, and apparently received his master’s degree at Vienna, but was forced to leave because of his religious convictions and in 1530 was matriculated at Rostock. Finally completing his studies, he was recalled to Lubeck, where he remained until 1536, when Count William of Nassau called him to Siegen as rector of the Latin school. In the following year he was appointed superintendent and chaplain to the count, and henceforth all his energies were devoted to the cause of Lutheranism. […] He also came into momentary contact with the English movement against the Roman Church, this being the occasion of his Loci aliquot communes et theologici (Frankfort, 1538); English translation, under the [above] title. As a distinguished theologian Sarcerius could boast that he had framed church orders for twenty-four counties. […] The course of events [circa 1562] lead him further and further away from Melanchthon, and at the colloquy of Worms in 1557 he was on the side of the Weimar theologians.” (Schaff-Herzog)“In [1532] Taverner appealed for help to Cromwell, to whom he was unknown, not daring, as he said, to ask for the king’s liberality without first communicating with Cromwell. Cromwell induced the Duke of Norfolk to promise him a small pension, and in 1533 Taverner was described as ‘last year master of Greek in Cambridge, and now Cromwell’s client.’ He also entered as a student at the Inner Temple, and probably with a view to Cromwell’s service, devoted himself to a study of law. In 1536 Cromwell secured his appointment as clerk of the privy seal, and in August 1537 he was enabled to marry. Meanwhile, Taverner, under Cromwell’s direction, was actively engaged in producing works designed to encourage the reformation of England. […] [In the year before Taverner produced his translation of the Bible, the first edition of the current work was published.] In 1539 appeared Taverner’s English version of the Bible. […] The fall of Cromwell put a stop to Taverner’s literary activity and endangered his position. […] Taverner retained his position as clerk of the signet throughout Edward VI’s reign. On 13 May 1552, though a layman, he was licensed to preach, and he is said to have frequently officiated in this capacity before Edward VI. On Mary’s accession, he lost his place in the signet office, but lived unmolested at his house at Norbiton, Surrey, through the reign. He is also said to have been in the habit of preaching in the streets and catechizing children on religious topics. He died at Wood Eaton on 14 July 1575, and was buried with some ceremony in the chancel of the church.” (DNB)

STC 21755a.5

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932G Saint Augustine 354-430

Certaine select Prayers gathered out of S. Augustines Meditations, whiche he calleth his selfe Talke with God.[with] S. Avgvstines Manuell, or little Booke of the Contemplation of Christ, or of Gods worde,wherby the remembraunce of the heauenly desires which is falne a slepe may be quickned vp againe.

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London: Printed by Iohn Day dwelling ouer Aldersgate, 1575          $11,000

Octavo 139 x 90 mm A-S8, T4. Second edition. The first title-page is a bit browned and worn. It has been mounted. The following three leaves have very old minor, marginal paper repairs. One affects the woodcut border at the fore edge with some loss of the woodcut, which has been drawn in pencil. One text leaf has a minor paper repair in the blank margin at the foot of one leaf. The corner of one other page was folded up when 1156124_view 09_09 2the book was printed. This is a minor fault, which is really rather interesting. The leaf in question is K6. What first draws the eye is a little tear and a blank spot. The leaf was evidently torn and folded over at the exact moment of printing. This copy is bound in eighteenth century red morocco, tooled elaborately in gilt on both boards. It was rebacked somewhat recently in red leather, and tooled in gilt. On the front board the owner’s name, “A. Bunbury,” is tooled in gilt. The corners of the boards have been repaired. The edges of the leaves are gilt. The end-papers are embossed in red and gilt, the gilding has tarnished somewhat. Overall this is a very nice copy, in good condition, with an attractive binding. This selection of extracts from Saint 1156124_view 05_05 2Augustine’s Meditations contains two separate title-pages, although the collation is continuous, and the two together are considered a single work. It is a hand-sized devotional work, meant for pious reflection and inspiration, produced in the midst of the Elizabethan Reformation in England. As the Puritans in Parliament and the Queen wrestled over the details of the official church doctrine and the rights of non-Anglicans, English Catholics suffered with their own private dilemmas. In 1571 Parliament passed the Subscription Act, ordering that all clergy ordained under Henry VIII or Mary I, and any new ordinand or appointee to a benefice, should swear obedience to the Thirty-Nine Articles. In 1572 the Puritans attempted to introduce a bill into Parliament which would permit individual congregations to amend the Book of Common Prayer as they saw fit and which would enforce the Act of Uniformity only against Catholics. Elizabeth insisted on its withdrawal. In 1574 the first Catholic missionary priests arrived from Douai and Rheims to establish contact with Catholic families. The works of Augustine, and other Saints common to Protestants and Catholics could be published without controversy, and provide solace to all in this difficult time.

STC 925.

Copies – Brit.Isles                                                                                                                                                              British Library
Cardiff Central Library
Cardiff University
Oxford University Bodleian Library
Oxford University Bodleian Library
Oxford University Bodleian Library (includes The Vicar’s Library, ST. Mary’s Church, Marlborough)
St. Edmund’s College
Copies – N.America  
Folger Shakespeare
Henry E. Huntington Library
Pierpont Morgan Library
University of Illinois
Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

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Time For another List of 10 VERY VERY rare early English books Books!

NO listed Copies

 

  1.  935G  R[ichard] Brown[e]

The English-School Reformed: containing, first, rules, shewing the nature of vowels, consonants, syllables, diphthongs, dividing of syllables, and of stops and points. Secondly, a praxis shewing the use of the said rules, in a dialogue. Thirdly, words from one, to six an seven syllables, exactly divided. Fourthly, a collection of words that agree in sound, but differ in sense, and spelling. Fifthly, another collection of words that are writ one way and sounded another. Sixthly, English words contracted, figures and numeral letters, &c. and, lastly, an accidence adapted to our English tongue. By R. Brown, master of a private school in St. Ann’s Parish, Westminster.

London: Printed for A. and J. Churchil at the Black Swan, 1710      $2900

Octavo 179mm pp. [iv] [2] 3-110 1-2 [i] Fourth Edition Contemporary calf expertly repaired and refurbished (by Riley of Haverthwaite). Pencil marks on p. 78, paper uniformly light browned. A good copy of an unrecorded edition. Last four leaves are “Good Manners for Schools: or Qui mihi done into English verse” by R. Foord. Lacks endpapers.This text appears to serve as an educational supplement to school attendance. Some sections employ a question-and-answer format, facilitating two-person study. On page 91, for example, the author responds to a question about English noun declension thus: “And after this manner are all Nouns Substantives declined that are not defective, that is, that have both Numbers: As for such that want either Singular or Plural, the very sense of the word itself sufficiently denotes. Thus, as Goods, Riches, Victuals, &c. want the Singular; so all proper Names of Persons, Places, or Things, want the Plural; as Richard, Thomas, London, Ale, Sack, Wheat, Barley, Gold, Silver; so Righteousness, Integrity, Drunkenness, &c.” The text is readable and entertaining, and offers insight into the educational curriculum of the day.The first and third editions of this book contain an aditional engraved title page, as engraved plates are printed separately and are not included in the signed gathering. The unsigned first gathering of this unrecorded fourth edition is [iii], indicating that there is possibly a half title missing.Previous owners’ names and notes in ink in a mainly contemporary hand on the pastedowns and verso of the final leaf. All editions of this work are rare.

ESTC notes only the first and third editions (1700 and 1707, respectively).

 

2.   931G John Bailey 1644-1697

Man’s chief End To Glorifie God, Or Some Brief Sermon-Notes. On I Co. 10. 31. By the Reverend Mr. John Bailey, Sometime Preacher and Prisoner of Christ at Limerick in Ireland, And now Pastor to the Church of Christ in Watertown in New=England. John 17.4,5. I have Glorified thee on Earth and now Father Glorifie me with thine own Self. Pet. I. 15. I will endeavour that after my Decease you may have these things always in remembrance.

1155949

Boston: Printed by Samuel Green, and are to be Sold by Richard Wilkins Bookseller near the Town-House. Anno 1689       $13,000

Octavo 5.8 x 3.75 inches a4, A-K8; A-C8 (Lacking text leaves A5 and H6, and the blanks C7 and C8). First edition. This is a lovely copy that tells the story of early printing and life in the wild American colonies from the earliest period. In 1689, when it was new, it was bound practically and economically in a simple sheepskin binding. (Think of the seventeenth century American sheep!) This in itself is a testament to the firm footing already gained by the earliest English inhabitants of the Massachusetts Bay colony. All domestic breeds of sheep, cow and fowl were imported from the old world on board the same ships that carried the religious and economic aspirants who made the transatlantic voyage. The binding has not been changed or repaired since the seventeenth century, and although it is worn and shows its knocks, its very survival is worthy of respect. “The Reverend John Bailey was born near Blackburn, Lancashire. Thomas, his father, as described by Cotton Mather: ‘was a man of a very licentious conversation; a gamester, a dancer, a very lewd company-keeper. The mother of this elect vessel one day took him, while he was yet a child, and calling the family together, made him to pray with them. His father coming to understand at what a rate the child had prayed with his family, it smote the soul of him with a great conviction, and proved the beginning of his conversion unto God.’“Having walked far to attend non-conformist services, and having suffered imprisonment several times, John Bailey began, at the age of twenty-two, to preach so successfully at chester, and then at Limerick, that ‘he seemed rather to fish with a net than with a hook.’ When arrested, he asked his judges if praying and preaching with inoffensive Christians was a greater crime than carousing at a tavern. The recorder of the court replied: ‘We will have you to know, it is a greater crime.’“After fourteen years in Ireland he came over to Boston in 1683/4, remaining there as assistant at the Old South Church until he was installed at Watertown, in October 1686.” (Quoted from The Founders by Charles Knowles Bolton) Evans; 456; Wing B-448; Wing B-449; Evans; 457. {Evans and Wing treat ’Man’s chief end to glorifie God’ and ’To my loving and dearly beloved Christian friends …’ as separate bibliographical items, however the preface to ’Man’s chief end to glorifie God’ calls for ’To my loving and dearly beloved Christian friends …’; verify whether these items were also issued separately.} Eight copies in U.S. libraries, two copy in the U.K. No copies in Irish libraries.

Copies – Brit.Isles LinkBritish Library
Congregational Library
Dr. Williams’s Library
Copies – N.America LinkAmerican Antiquarian Society
Boston Athenaeum
Boston Public, Main
Harvard University
Harvard University, Houghton Library
John Carter Brown Library, Brown University
Massachusetts Historical Society
New York Public Library

3.   926G Benjamin Jenks 1648-1724

Two letters written to a gentleman of note guilty of common swearing. The second edition. To which is added a third letter to another gentleman in the commission of the peace’ exciting him to the performance of his part in executing the late act against profane cursing and swearing.

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London: Printed for Benj. Tooke, at the Middle-Temple Gate in Fleetstreet, 1965  $3500

Octavo 6 X 3 1/2 inches pp. 76 [2, errata & blank] First Edition Contemporary calf, rebacked and endpapers renewed. Title repaired at lower corner, a few leaves close-trimmed at lower margin just touching the edge of one or two catchwords, a couple of manuscript corrections, some spotting and water stains, mainly to second part. 18th century ownership inscription to renewed f.e.p. “From Noble Organs, Sir, we expect Harmonious Sounds: and Verses of Humour should not be prostituted to the basest uses” (p. 39).Jenks was a Church of England clergyman and author. He matriculated at Queen’s College, Oxford. He remained minister at Harley until his death. He published a number of sermons, meditations, and books of prayer. These latter proved especially popular and were reprinted into the nineteenth century. According to the ODNB, “Jenks developed moralizing messages in several of his writings, lecturing against swearing, ledness, and lust”, notably in his several letters on swearing, which were usually addressed to “a Gentleman of Note”.The letters were first published in 1691 [Wing J5A/ESTC R216972]. This second edition of Jenks’ Two Letters also includes his Third Letter. The Third Letter was also issued separately and is recorded on ESTC as Wing L1660/R26782 (Lambeth Palace Library, Harvard University, Harvard University Houghton Library only). The first edition is a very rare book with ESTC recording only two copies (British Library and Huntington only). This second edition of Jenks’ letters, published 1965, is unrecorded on ESTC. Wing J5A/ESTC R216972; Wing L1660/ESTC R26782

 

 

 

4.    938G Samuel Willard (1640-1707)

The Peril of the Times Displayed, or, The Danger of Mens taking up with a Form of Godliness, But Denying the Power of it. Being The Substance of several Sermons Preached: By Samuel Willard, Teacher of a Church in Boston, N.E. Sumenda sunt amura Salubria.

1155918

Boston : printed by B. Green, & J. Allen. Sold by Benjamin Eliot, 1700.      $15000

Duodecimo 5 1/4 X 3 inches A-G . First edition This copy is bound in original American sheepskin over scabbard, quite worn. Willard,was “the son of a military and political leader, and destined to become one of the most important preachers among the second generation of New England Puritans, was born at Concord, Massachusetts. Trained in orthodoxy at Harvard College, he graduated in 1659, and was the only member of his class to go on for an M. A. degree. He served two churches (Groton and Boston’s South Church), played a leading role in the Reforming Synod of 1679, and at the end of his life was acting president of Harvard.Basic to all of Willard’s preaching was the doctrine of the covenant. He uncompromisingly opposed sectarian and Anglican Arminianism by preaching the Reformed doctrines of predestination, total depravity, limited atonement, irresistible grace, and perseverance of the saints. He denied the possibility of real preparatory works, and consistently magnified the sovereignty of divine grace.Willard equally opposed Antinominanism by means of the historic Reformed emphases on revelation, justification, and sanctification. Throughout his ministry he propagated and defended New England’s orthodoxy on infant baptism, a learned ministry, and the alliance of church and state in religion, opposing both Baptist and Quaker inroads. Willard was also influential in halting the Salem witchcraft trials in 1692, and in promoting the historic fast day four years later.” Seymour Van DykenMany of his sermons were published in his lifetime, but his magnum opus, A Compleat body of Divinity was published posthumously, the largest book ever printed in New England at the time. This book was quite influential upon the next generation of ministers in New England, including Stoddard and Edwards. None of Willard’s works are currently in print. Willard preached at Boston’s Third Church during the illness of Rev. Thomas Thacher and gave an election-day sermon on June 5. The Third Church called Willard to be its Teacher, an associate pastor, on April 10, 1678. When Thacher died on October 15, Willard became their only pastor. Members of the congregation included a variety of influential members of the colony: John Hull, Samuel Sewall, Edward Rawson, Thomas Brattle, Joshua Scottow, Hezekiah Usher, and Capt. John Alden (the son of John and Priscilla Alden of Plymouth). His wife Abigail died sometime in the first half of 1679; in July of that year he married Eunice Tyng, a possible sister-in-law of Joseph Dudley.

Holmes, T.J. Increase Mather, 168; Evans, 963 Wing (2nd ed.), W2289

Copies – N.America LinkAmerican Antiquarian Society
Boston Public, Main
Harvard University, Houghton Library
Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery
Massachusetts Historical Society
New York Public Library
Peabody Essex Museum, Phillips Library
University of Virginia

 

5.   700G      F.G. = Francis Gregory     1625?-1707 

    Oνομασικὸν βραχύ      (Onomastikon brachy)  sive. Nomenclatura brevis Anglo-Latino-Græca. In usum scholæ Westmonasteriensis. Per F.G. Editio duodecima emendata. Together with Examples of the five declensions of nouns; with the words in propria quæ maribus and quæ genus reduced to each declension_   

dsc_00067

London : printed by J. Macock, for Richard Royston, book-seller to His most Sacred Majesty 1672                           $2,200

Octavo, 6 3/4 X 4 1/2 inches.   A-E8  This copy is bound in full original sheep cords worn  spine torn but sewing and binding still holding!   Gregory, born about 1625, was a native of Woodstock,  Oxfordshire. He was educated at Westminster under Busby, who, as he afterwards said, was not only a master but a father to him, and in 1641 was elected to a scholarship at Trinity College, Cambridge, graduating M.A. in 1648. He returned to Westminster School as usher till he was appointed head-master of the grammar school at Woodstock. He was a successful teacher, and numbered among his pupils several sons of noble families. An ardent royalist he was chosen to preach the thanksgiving sermon for the Restoration at St. Mary’s, Oxford, 27 May 1660, and afterwards published it under the title of ‘David’s Return from Banishment.’ He also published ‘Votivum Carolo, or a Welcome to his sacred Majesty Charles II from the Master and Scholars of Woodstock School,’ a volume of English and Latin verses composed by Gregory and his pupils. Shortly afterwards he became head-master of a newly founded school at Witney, Oxfordshire, and 22 Sept. 1661 he was incorporated D.D. of Oxford University from St. Mary Hall. He was appointed a chaplain to the king, and in 1671 was presented by Earl Rivers to the living of Hambleden, Buckinghamshire. He. kept this post till his death in 1707. He was buried in the church, where a tablet was erected to his memory._   This book consists of Parallel vocabulary : Then Examples of the five declensions of nouns; followed by Examples of Adjectives. _   Not in Wing see G1899E a different printer                According to the ESTC there are 28 editions printed between 1651 and 1769 listing only eleven copies in the US, This copy is listed with only one copy at the Westminster School (where else could you expect?!)

 

6*** 670G   Edmund Gurnay      ±1648

The demonstration of Antichrist. By Edmund Gurnay, Bach. Theol. p. of Harpley Norfolke

dsc_00076

London:Printed by I[ohn] B[eale] for Iames Boler, and are to be sold at the signe of the Marigold in Pauls Churchyard 1631                      $2,900

Octavo, 5 1/4 X 3 1/4 inches. First edition A12,B5{ lacking b6 Blank}. This copy is bound in calf boards rebacked.       Gurney matriculated at Queens’ College, Cambridge, on 30 October 1594, and graduated B.A. in 1600. He was elected Norfolk fellow of Corpus Christi College in 1601, proceeded to M.A. in 1602, and B.D. in 1609. In 1607 he was suspended from his fellowship for not being in orders, but was reinstated by the vice-chancellor. In 1614 he left Cambridge, on being presented to the rectory of Edgefield, Norfolk, which he held till 1620, when he received that of Harpley, Norfolk. Gurney was inclined to puritanism, as appears from his writings. On one occasion he was cited to appear before the bishop for not using a surplice, and on being told he was expected to always wear it, ‘came home, and rode a journey with it on.’ He further made his citation the occasion for publishing his tract vindicating the Second Commandment. Thomas Fuller, who was personally acquainted with him, says: ‘He was an excellent scholar, could be humourous, and would be serious as he was himself disposed. His humours were never prophane towards God or injurious towards his neighbours.’ Gurney died in 1648. Gurney was married, and apparently had a son called Protestant (d. 1624—monument at Harpley). DNB STC (2nd ed.), 12529 [Stationer’s Register: Entered 29 January [1631.]

Copies – Brit.Isles British Library
Cambridge University Library
Cambridge University Magdalene College
Congregational Library
Lincoln Cathedral Library
Oxford University                                                                                                                           Copies – N.America   :Folger Shakespeare &Huntington (only)

Fuller’s Worthies, p. 258, ed. 1652

 

 

7.    305G Charles Buchanan. b. 1660 or 61

The Nature and Design of Holy Days.

dsc_000411

London: printed by W. B. for Richard Sare, at Grays-Inn-Gate, in Holborn, 1705.      $2,200

Octavo, . First Edition A-I4/8/K3 +19 Full page engravings. There is an engraved frontispiece, discolored, and nineteen full-page engravings extraneous to the text. Bound in full modern calfskin, largely intact, contents with some browning along the gutters, some leaves becoming loose, endleaves with old tape, contemporary annotations. And Price on title page: Price 6d stitch’d, or 8d Bound. This book is not only rare but it is probably unique, with the illustrations, the Estc lists the book as anonymous, yet is undoubtedly but Charles Buchanan. ESTC makes no mention of frontispiece or illustrations. Three editions listed in ESTC, the first and third editions each only show one Copies – Brit.Isles National Library of Scotland
Oxford University
Oxford University Corpus Christi College

U.S. library location: the Houghton Library, the second edition has no North American holdings, see ESTC T170660.

 

8.    293G    Robert Russel  fl 1692

Seven Sermons: Viz. I. Of the Unpardonable Sin against the Holy Ghost: or, the Sin Unto Death. II. The Saint’s Duty and Exercise: in Two Parts. Being an Exhortation to, and Directions for Prayer. III. The Accepted Time and Day of Salvation. IV. The End of Time, and Beginning of Eternity. V. Joshua’s Resolution to Serve the Lord. VI. The Way to Heaven Made Plain. VII. The Future State of Man: or, a Treatise of the Resurrection. By Robert Russel, at Wadhurst, in Sussex

dsc_00095

Boston:Reprinted by John Allen, for John Eliot, at his shop in Orange-Street,1718                          $1,600

Duodecimo, 6 X 3.25 inches. A1 (lacking A2-A5) A6 B1&2, B5&6, CI6, K1&2,(lacking K3&4)L1&2 (lacking L3&4)L5&6, N1-6, O1 (lacking O2-5) O6, P1 (Lacking P2-5 (P6 blank) This book is bound in sheep over scabord and sewn on two leather sewing supports , a typical early American binding. All Editions of this book are quite rare, there are only two copies of the Boston editions both at American Antiquarian Society Worcester. Of Russell, I could find very little, yet he was immensely popular, especially in the colonies being reprinted in Boston in 1701, 1727 & 1728. There is no doubt that Russell’s style of sermonizing upon sin met with the Mather’s approval. All early editions are quite rare. Estc Locates only one copy at The American Antiquarian Society .                          

 

 

9.  606G John Reading  1588-1667

Dauids soliloquie. Containing many comforts for afflicted mindes. As they were deliuered in sundry sermons at Saint Maries in Douer. By Io: Reading.

dsc_000410

Printed [by John Legat] for Robert Allot, and are to be sold at his shop in Saint Pauls Church-yeard at the signe of the Greyhound :1627         $950

Octavo, 5 1/2 X 3 inches . A-V X .Leaves A1, A11, A12 are blank. With additional engraved title page (plate), signed: F. Hulsius invenit et sculps·. This copy is bound in original soiled vellum. Reading matriculated at Magdalen Hall, Oxford, on 4 May 1604, and graduated B.A. on 17 October 1607. He took holy orders about 1614 and was chaplain to Edward la Zouche, 11th Baron Zouche of Haringeworth, Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports and governor of Dover Castle. After preaching at Dover many sermons before his patron, Reading was appointed minister of St. Mary’s on 2 December 1616, at the request of the parishioners, . He secured a position of influence in the town, and subsequently became chaplain to Charles I .  Although his sermons advocated Puritan principles, he supported the king’s cause in the English Civil War. In 1642 his study at Dover was plundered by parliamentary soldiers, and he was imprisoned for nineteen months.  By direction of Charles I, and William Laud,  Reading was made  the rector of Chartham, Kent, on 27 January 1643.  The House of Commons declined to sanction Reading’s institution, and appointed Edward Corbett. Laud refused to abandon Reading.  A prebend in Canterbury which was bestowed on Reading at the same time brought him no advantage. In July 1644 he was presented by Sir William Brockman to the living of Cheriton, Kent, and in the same year Reading was appointed by the Westminster Assembly to be one of nine commissioned to write annotations on the New Testament. Shortly after 1645, on the discovery of a plot for the capture of Dover Castle by the royalists, he was arrested by command of Major John Boys, and hurried to Dover Castle, and next day to Leeds Castle. There he composed the “Guide to the Holy City.”’ He was at length discharged by the parliamentary committee for Kent, and the restitution of his goods was ordered; but his livings were sequestered. On 8 January 1647 he was a prisoner in the Fleet Prison. On 10 March 1650 he attacked the right of unordained preaching in a public disputation with the baptist Samuel Fisher of Folkestone. Fisher used arguments from Jeremy Taylor’s “Discourse of the Liberty of Prophesying,”’ which Reading had already criticised in print.Reading was restored to his Dover living shortly before the English Restoration of 1660. On 25 May 1660 he presented to Charles II, on his first landing, a large bible with gold clasps, in the name of the corporation of Dover, and made a short speech, which was published as a broadside. He was shortly afterwards restored to Chartham, made canon of the eighth prebend of Canterbury, and reinstituted to Cheriton on 18 July . In October following the university of Oxford conferred on him the degree of D.D. per literas regias. Before August 1662 he resigned the living at Dover.   STC (2nd ed.), 20788 Estc Locates Folger and Huntington only.

10***723G Langston, John. 1641-1704

Lusus poeticus Latino-Anglicanus in usum scholarum. Or The more eminent sayings of the Latin poets collected; and for the service of youth in that ancient exercise, commonly called capping of verses, alphabetically digested; and for the greater benefit of young beginners i the Latin tongue, rendred into English. By John Langston teacher of a private grammar-school near Spittle-fields, London .

dsc_00069

London : printed for Henry Eversden at the Crown in Cornhil, near the Stocks-market, 1675.      $2,400

Octavo, 5 3/4 X 3 3/4 Inches . First edition, 2nd edition in 1679 and 3rd edition in 1688. This copy is bound in full 17th century calf, recently expertly rebacked.   This alphabetically arranged compendium of eminent sayings by Latin poets for the service of youth in capping of verses is the work for which Langston is best remembered. He issued a lesser known grammatical work, “Poeseos Graecae Medulla”, in 1679. He published nothing of a religious nature, but issued the following for school purposes: 1. ‘Lusus Poeticus Latino-Anglicanus,’ &c., 1675, 8vo; 2nd edition, 1679, 8vo; 3rd edition, 1688, 12mo (intended as an aid to capping verses). 2. ‘ π . Sive Poese Græcæ Medulla, cum versione Latina,’ &c., 1679, 8vo.” “LANGSTON, JOHN (1641?–1704), independent divine, was born about 1641, according to Calamy. He went from the Worcester grammar school to Pembroke College, Oxford, where he was matriculated as a servitor in Michaelmas term 1655, and studied for some years. Wood does not mention his graduation. At the Restoration in 1660 (when, if Calamy is right, he had not completed his twentieth year) he held the sequestered perpetual curacy of Ashchurch, Gloucestershire, from which be was displaced by the return of the incumbent. He went to London, and kept a private school near Spitalfields. On the coming into force of the Uniformity Act (24 Aug. 1662) he crossed over to Ireland as chaplain and tutor to Captain Blackwell, but returned to London and to school-keeping in 1663. Under the indulgence of 1672 he took out a license, in concert with William Hooke (d. March 1677, aged 77), formerly master of the Savoy, ‘to preach in Richard Loton’s house in Spittle-yard.’ Some time after 1679 he removed into Bedfordshire, where he ministered till, in 1686, he received an invitation from a newly separated congregation of independents, who had hired a building in Green Yard, St. Peter’s parish, Ipswich. Under his preaching a oongregational church of seventeen persons was formed on 12 Oct. 1686. Langston, his wife, and thirty others were admitted to membership on 22 Oct., when a call to the pastorate was given him; he accepted it on 29 Oct., and was set apart by four elders at a solemn fast on 2 Nov. A ‘new chappell’ in Green Yard was opened on 26 June 1687, and the church membership was raised to 123 persons, many of them from neighbouring villages. Calamy says he was driven out of his house, was forced to remove to London, and was there accused of being a jesuit, whereupon he published a successful ‘Vindication.’ The publication is unknown, and Calamy gives no date; the year 1697 has been suggested. Langston’s church-book gives no hint of any persecution, but shows that he was in the habit of paying an annual visit of about three weeks’ duration to London with his wife. He notices the engagement with the French fleet at La Hogue on 19 May 1692, ‘for ye defeat of wh blessed he God,’ and the earthquake on 8 Sept. in the same year. The tone of his ministry was conciliatory ‘towards people of different perswasions.’ In November 1702 Benjamin Glandfield (d. 10 Sept. 1720) was appointed as his assistant. Langston died on 12 Jan. 1704, ‘aetat. 64.’ (DNB). Wing L411;  Harvard,Huntington,U of Ill, U of Texas,Yale . Arber’s Term cat. I 213.

Copies – Brit.Isles British Library
Cambridge University King’s College
Durham University Library
National Library of Scotland
National Library of Wales
Nottingham University Library
Oxford University Bodleian Library
Signet Library
The National Trust
Winchester College Fellows Library

 

 

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