Search

jamesgray2

A discussion of interesting books from my current stock A WordPress.com site

Month

April 2018

The nature of uncleanness consider’d

136JJean FredericOstervald1663-1747

The nature of uncleanness consider’d: wherein is discoursed of the causes and consequences of this sin, and the duties of such as are under the guilt of it. To which is added, a discourse concerning the nature of chastity, and the means of obtaining it. By J. F. Ostervald, minister of the church of Neuschâtel, author of A treatise of the causes of the present corruption of christians, a catechism,&c

London: printed for Printed for R. Bonwicke, W. Freeman, Tim : Goodwin, J. Walthoe, M. Wotton, S. Manship, J. Nicholson, B. Took, R. Parker, and R. Smith . (1708)                  $1,800
Quarto [4],xxxiv,[10],280p.first and only edition Early calf binding, hansomly tooled spine .
This is a very interesting of “clealness’ and it’s opposite. “His writings had a great influence, bearing spiritual renewal among Waldensian, Dutch, German, Hungarian and Scandinavian Protestants. Moreover, the English Royal Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts – of which he was a member – brought his teachings to the countries of the Middle East, India, Canada and the West-Indian Islands. His highly influential oeuvre was later called “the second Reformation”.1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, Volume 20“Yet never was more need of Difcourfes of this nature than now, when Wickednefs appears bare-fae’d, and too many are neither afraid nor alhamed to glory in it; as if it were a piece of Bravery, or a Jefting Matter, to bid Defiance to the Almighty, and daringly provoke him to his Face. When People come to this height of Impiety, it is high time to warn them of their exceilive Folly and Danger, and to intreat and befeech them to bethink themlelves in time, left the Wrath of God break forth upon them, and there be no efcaping. This is a dreadful Case, and may juftly be expefted to bring down heavy Judgments upon a People, where thefe Iniquities prevail, to make their Land mourn, and the Inhabitants thereof languid, or poffibly, as it fared with God’s own chofen People the Jews, to let them be no more a Nation.Were they only the common and more ordinary Sins of this kind, fuch as Adultery. Fornication, &c. that we have caufe to complain of, thefe would miferably expofe us to the terrible Indignation of the Almighty, and the dire Effects of it. But to our Sorrow and Shame it muft be confefs’d, that yet more grievous Abominations are found amongft us, fuch as our Country had only heard of in former Ages, but which make too fad a noife in this, to the Terror and Ailonifhment of all the Faithful in the Land.”
ESTC T86652 (two copies west of the Mississippi.

1378 Wycliffe New Testament: First Printed Edition (1731)

1378 Wycliffe New Testament: First Printed Edition (1731)

‘I hail thee the first of Englishmen, who dares brave the rage of superstition, in the cause of intellectual freedom’

The new Testament of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ translated out of the Latin Vulgat by John Wiclif, S.T.P. Prebendary of Aust in the Collegiate Church of Westbury, and Rector of Lutterworth, about 1378. To which is præfixt a History of the several translations of the H. Bible and N. Testament, &c. into English, both in MS and Print, and of the most remarkable Editions of them since the Invention of Printing. By John Lewis, A. M. Chaplain to the Right Honourable Thomas Lord Malton, and Minister of Mergate.

nt-in-english-1731-general-title-page

(General Title reads:) “THE NEW TESTAMENT OF OUR LORD AND SAVIOUR JESUS CHRIST TRANSLATED OUT OF THE LATIN VULGAT BY JOHN WICLIF, S.T.P. PREBENDARY OF AUST. IN THE COLLEGIATE CHURCH OF WESTBURY, AND RECTOR OF LUTTERWORTH, ABOUT 1378. ….TO WHICH IS PRAEFIXT A HISTORY OF THE SEVERAL TRANSLATIONS OF THE H. BIBLE AND N. TESTAMENT, &c. INTO ENGLISH, BOTH IN MS AND PRINT, AND OF THE MOST REMARKABLE EDITIONS OF THEM SINCE THE INVENTION OF PRINTING”

(New Testament Title reads:) “THE NEW TESTAMENT WITH THE LESSONS TAKEN OUT OF THE OLD LAW, READ IN CHURCHES ACCORDING TO THE USE OF SARUM, TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH FROM THE VULGAR LATIN. BY JOHN WICLIF, D.D. RECTOR OF LUTTERWORTH, 1380”
London:By John Lewis, A.M., Sold by Thomas Page and William Mount  Tower Hill; and William Parker at  King’s Head in St. Paul’s Church Yard, M, DCC, XXXI. (1731).   $55,000

iv, [4], 108, 156, viii p., [3] leaves of plates : ill., port. ; 39 cm.

nt-in-english-1731-frontispiece-of-the-nt-portrait-of-john-wyclif.jpg
Folio, measuring 15″ x 10″. With its Original Full Calf Leather Binding, Title label on Original Spine with 6 raised bands and chipping to top half inch. Both General Title Page and New Testament Title Pages are present and Intact. Both Original Blank leaves front and rear are also present and intact with no marks or writing. With 3 Engraved Full Page Plates, the General frontispiece of Lewis, the New Testament Frontispiece of Wycliffe and a full-page plate with various scenes in the History of the English Translations section of the Bible. All Titles and Preliminaries present, Dedication, Advertisement, Errata leaf, etc. With 108 printed pages to the first part of the Folio (History of English Translations) and 156 printed pages to the New Testament itself. Plus, an 8-page Glossary in the rear. With no marginal tears to first fronts of Lewis otherwise tear free! All Pages are Clean, Crisp and Fresh with LARGE MARGINS!!!) With Woodcut Illustrated Initials (done in the manner of the Original Manuscripts) and Woodcut Headers and Tailpieces throughout. This is a very fine copy.

A bill in the House of Lords in 1390 to suppress Wycliffe’s version was defeated, in part because of the argument that if it were to be suppressed because it led to heresy, then the Latin Bible, source of the greatest percentage of heresies, should be treated equally. A convocation at Oxford in 1408 banned translation and publication of the Scriptures except under ecclesiastical approval, prohibiting public and private reading of any translation from Wycliffe onwards. This, the only authoritative prohibition of English scriptures, hung suspended, an instrument of official terror, over the heads of all who dared read the Word in their own tongue.

In 1415, Wycliffe was branded a heretic by the Council of Constance, which ordered his bones disinterred and thrown far from Holy Ground; this was done in 1428. After Wycliffe’s death, a revised version of his Bible began to circulate,
attributed to John Purvey, a staunch “Lollard” (as Wycliffe’s followers were known) who recanted in 1401. Purvey’s version deliberately omitted Wycliffe’s name – no need to remind anyone of the prohibitions!

JOHN OF WYCLIFFE, of noble birth, was born before 1324; even as a student at Oxford, in 1356, he “published” a tract, “The Last Age of the Church,” which looked at the sad state of Europe, morally and ecclesiastically, and found a counterpoint to its depravity in the love and intercession of the Redeemer. Wycliffe entered the priesthood; by 1360, at Oxford, he was outspokenly opposed to the Mendicant Friars, once itinerant clerics, but by then reveling in wealth and power as the direct agents of the Pope. Wycliffe, like Luther some time later, attacked corruptions with the Bible in hand, “feeling his way into the clearer light of truth.”

In 1366 Wycliffe, as Professor of Sacred Theology at Oxford, convinced himself that the sacred Word needed to be read and preached in a form people could understand. After being a Commissioner negotiating with papal emissaries at Bruges, observing first-hand the venality and corruption of the Roman courtiers (“Antichrist stood revealed before him”), he returned to England, where his open expression of his doctrines on reform landed him in hot water with the clerical

 

[DMH 1011 (“The earliest printed edition of Wycliffe’s version of the New Testament. . Only 160 copies of this book were issued”) Delaveau & Hillard 3947 (more manuscripts of this survive than any other medieval English text), despite being condemned by the Church for being heretical and officially

outlawed in England in 1409.

 

 About 1376, Wycliffe undertook his great task of translating the Bible into English, from the Latin Vulgate version, knowing full well the Pope would prohibit its “publication” (which in those days before printing meant reading a manuscript aloud, or making it available for copying). The translation was completed about 1380, and “publication” commenced immediately – as did opposition to it. His chief opponent, Henry Knighton, canon of Leicester, said, “And so the gospel pearl is cast abroad, to be trodden underfoot of swine; and what was dear to clergy and laity is now rendered, as it were, the common jest of both; so that the gem of the Church becomes the derision of laymen, and that is now theirs forever…”

Wycliffe was the right man at the right time, for the English language was no longer exclusively for use by peasants, but was spoken at court as well. The easing of feudalism, the rise of commerce, and the general disgust with the corruption and vices of the clergy made Wycliffe’s plan of widespread publication both popular and timely. Wycliffe died in December 1385; Knighton commented that Wycliffe’s followers, preachers of the Gospel in the people’s language, were so numerous that if two people met on a road, one was bound to be a “Wycliffite.”

 

In 1415, Wycliffe was branded a heretic by the Council of Constance, which ordered his bones disinterred and thrown far from Holy Ground; this was done in 1428. After Wycliffe’s death, a revised version of his Bible began to circulate, attributed to John Purvey, a staunch “Lollard” (as Wycliffe’s followers were known) who recanted in 1401. Purvey’s version deliberately omitted Wycliffe’s name – no need to remind anyone of the prohibitions!

What Wycliffe undertook, and other carried on, became the predominant English version throughout the 15th century and the beginning of the 16th, until the time of Tyndale, when newly discovered manuscripts in Greek and Hebrew rendered any translation solely out of the Vulgate obsolete. In fact, none of Wycliffe’s version was printed until 1731 (This New Testament being sold) and only 160 of them were printed. There was a second edition of 1810 and a third printed in 1848. The complete Wycliffe Bible (both Old & New Testaments) had to wait until 1850 to be printed for the first time!

Herbarum vires Macer tibi carmine dicet

164J  Floridus Macer, or Odo von Meung;  Aemilius Macer;  Guillermo Gueroaldo;

Herbarum vires macer tibi carmine dicet. Cum bonis ambula. Mors peccatorum pessima. Sic uteretuo ut alieno non egeas DSC_0006

[Paris] np. [Pierre Baquelier]. nd. [c, 1515]                                $9,500

 

Octavo 5 1/2 X3 1/2 inches . 157 of 160 unnumbered leaves. a-v5 {lacking V6-8 two text leaves and one blank. [last blank]. There is a Large woodcut on title of scholar in his study,(see above) and 65 largeDSC_0007 2 woodcuts of plants within double ruled border, small white on black printed initials,  The Title page is a little dusty, light age yellowing, the odd marginal thumb mark or spot, very minor occasional marginal water-stain. A good copy, crisp and generally clean. This copy is bound in C19th  century quarter calf over paper boards,

Very rare and interesting edition of this early French herbal, one of the earliest illustrated editions, with 65 cuts of plants.  The illustrations of the plants first appear in the Geneva Editions  three different printers Goff M5,M6, M7, all dated “after 1500” All thereof these editions are quite rare in US Libraries.

On the chronology of the Genevan editions of Macer Floridus, see H. Delarue in Genava 2 (1924) pp.177-86. Printed in the same types as the Arcana medicinae (Goff A947). Lőkkös dates about 1500, CIBN after 1500?, Goff after 1500. Dated about 1505 at BL. Woodcuts

The work takes the form of a Latin poem in hexameters, a poetic verse form that was most likely employed as a mnemonic device for physicians and midwives, describing the medical virtues of herbs. It was written under the pseudonym of Macer (with reference to the Roman poet Aemilius Macer, d. 15 BC). The author is generally identified with the French physician Odo de Meung-sur-Loire whose name is mentioned in a 12th-century copy of the text. This is“Perhaps the second edition with the prose commentary of Guill. Gueroaldus, which probably first appeared at Caen in 1509: see Brunet , III. 1270. The woodcut on the title is adapted from the earlier editions.

The 65 woodcuts of plants are closely copied also, but now have double line borders. ..DSC_0011 The text titled has been traditionally attributed to Odo de Meung, who is believed to have lived during the first half of the 11th century. Recent research has shown, however, that the De Viribus Herbarum was probably written in an earlier version, perhaps during the tenth century in Germany. The text was further expanded, including new data from the translation of Arabic texts into Latin in Salerno from the end of the 11th century onward. If this is the case, this text is good evidence of the continuity of scientific activity in the Middle Ages: its most ancient parts come from a period when there was a revival of interest in botany and a recovery of the classical tradition, while the most recent additions integrate the contribution of the Arabic world. “What was undoubtedly one of the more widely read works in this field (Botany) during the entire medieval period appeared contemporaneously with both Constantinus and the rise of Salerno. DSC_0012This work, consists of a catalogue of 77 herbs and their supposed medicinal properties; all expressed in 2269 lines of vulgar Latin verse. Even more curious is the fact that the poem not only refers to earlier medieval and botanical authors such as Walafrid Strabo; it was itself copied in part into the most significant remaining document of the medical school of Salerno, the Regimen Sanitatis Salernitanum. Macer Floridus is important not only for medical and botanical knowledge but also for a wider range of medieval intellectual history. Its significance lies in the fact that it is the first document of such length to indicate a renewed interest in these subjects in the 11th century, and appears to reflect no direct influence from any Arabic sources.” Bruce Flood. ‘The Medieval Herbal tradition of Macer Floridus.’ It was a very popular work going through several editions at the beginning of the the C16th and this rare edition contains a very charming suite of cuts . “

Guilelmus Gueroaldus (Gueroust or Gueroult),  was professor of medicine at Caen at the end of the 15th century. There exist different editions of the Macer Floridus consisting of the same number of 159 leaves, with the signatures a-v. Although they resemble each other very much, they are not identical.” Becher. BM STC Fr. C16th p. 295. Fairfax Murray I 347. Renouard, Imprimeurs et libraires parisiens du XVI siecle, t.3 n.35. Becher, A Catalogue of Early Herbals, 65. Arber p. 40.

Herbarum vires Macer tibi carmine dicet

164J  Floridus Macer, or Odo von Meung;  Aemilius Macer;  Guillermo Gueroaldo;

Herbarum vires macer tibi carmine dicet. Cum bonis ambula. Mors peccatorum pessima. Sic uteretuo ut alieno non egeas DSC_0006

[Paris] np. [Pierre Baquelier]. nd. [c, 1515]                                $9,500

 

Octavo 5 1/2 X3 1/2 inches . 157 of 160 unnumbered leaves. a-v5 {lacking V6-8 two text leaves and one blank. [last blank]. There is a Large woodcut on title of scholar in his study,(see above) and 65 largeDSC_0007 2 woodcuts of plants within double ruled border, small white on black printed initials,  The Title page is a little dusty, light age yellowing, the odd marginal thumb mark or spot, very minor occasional marginal water-stain. A good copy, crisp and generally clean. This copy is bound in C19th  century quarter calf over paper boards,

Very rare and interesting edition of this early French herbal, one of the earliest illustrated editions, with 65 cuts of plants.  The illustrations of the plants first appear in the Geneva Editions  three different printers Goff M5,M6, M7, all dated “after 1500” All thereof these editions are quite rare in US Libraries.

On the chronology of the Genevan editions of Macer Floridus, see H. Delarue in Genava 2 (1924) pp.177-86. Printed in the same types as the Arcana medicinae (Goff A947). Lőkkös dates about 1500, CIBN after 1500?, Goff after 1500. Dated about 1505 at BL. Woodcuts

The work takes the form of a Latin poem in hexameters, a poetic verse form that was most likely employed as a mnemonic device for physicians and midwives, describing the medical virtues of herbs. It was written under the pseudonym of Macer (with reference to the Roman poet Aemilius Macer, d. 15 BC). The author is generally identified with the French physician Odo de Meung-sur-Loire whose name is mentioned in a 12th-century copy of the text. This is“Perhaps the second edition with the prose commentary of Guill. Gueroaldus, which probably first appeared at Caen in 1509: see Brunet , III. 1270. The woodcut on the title is adapted from the earlier editions.

The 65 woodcuts of plants are closely copied also, but now have double line borders. ..DSC_0011 The text titled has been traditionally attributed to Odo de Meung, who is believed to have lived during the first half of the 11th century. Recent research has shown, however, that the De Viribus Herbarum was probably written in an earlier version, perhaps during the tenth century in Germany. The text was further expanded, including new data from the translation of Arabic texts into Latin in Salerno from the end of the 11th century onward. If this is the case, this text is good evidence of the continuity of scientific activity in the Middle Ages: its most ancient parts come from a period when there was a revival of interest in botany and a recovery of the classical tradition, while the most recent additions integrate the contribution of the Arabic world. “What was undoubtedly one of the more widely read works in this field (Botany) during the entire medieval period appeared contemporaneously with both Constantinus and the rise of Salerno. DSC_0012This work, consists of a catalogue of 77 herbs and their supposed medicinal properties; all expressed in 2269 lines of vulgar Latin verse. Even more curious is the fact that the poem not only refers to earlier medieval and botanical authors such as Walafrid Strabo; it was itself copied in part into the most significant remaining document of the medical school of Salerno, the Regimen Sanitatis Salernitanum. Macer Floridus is important not only for medical and botanical knowledge but also for a wider range of medieval intellectual history. Its significance lies in the fact that it is the first document of such length to indicate a renewed interest in these subjects in the 11th century, and appears to reflect no direct influence from any Arabic sources.” Bruce Flood. ‘The Medieval Herbal tradition of Macer Floridus.’ It was a very popular work going through several editions at the beginning of the the C16th and this rare edition contains a very charming suite of cuts . “

Guilelmus Gueroaldus (Gueroust or Gueroult),  was professor of medicine at Caen at the end of the 15th century. There exist different editions of the Macer Floridus consisting of the same number of 159 leaves, with the signatures a-v. Although they resemble each other very much, they are not identical.” Becher. BM STC Fr. C16th p. 295. Fairfax Murray I 347. Renouard, Imprimeurs et libraires parisiens du XVI siecle, t.3 n.35. Becher, A Catalogue of Early Herbals, 65. Arber p. 40.

A Miscellany of Divers Problems: Containing Ingenuous Solutions of Sundry Questions, Partly Moral, Partly of Other Subjects

Less like Bacon’s Essays and more like Wanley’s The Wonders of the Little World, Or Browne’s Pesudodoxia Epidemica.,and of course Joannes Jonstonus’ History of wonderful things.  The Divers Problem  deals with the curious things, ideas, and, common questions . It is a tour de force  of common sense thinking about common situation, with a little (small bit) of knowledge thrown in.

163J. P. Pellisson  [Also attributed to George Pellisson. Cf. BM.]

A miscellany of divers problems. Containing ingenuous solutions of sundry questions, partly moral, partly of other subjects. Translated out of French by Henry Some, M.A. late Fellow of the Kings Colledge in Cambridge.

 

London: printed for Charles Adams, and are to be sold at his shop at the sign of the Talbot, near St. Dunstans Church in Fleet-street 1662          $ SOLD

Duodecimo Leaves A3-5 missigned A2-4; title page is A2. A 0(±A1-A10) a b B-K L8 (complete)  . First Edition Without the initial blank leaf, some inkstains in the extreme upper margins at beginning and end, and a couple of catchwords and signature-marks shaved at foot. bound in Nineteenth-century half calf, spine gilt; quite rubbed but sound. Ownership inscription “Gulielmus Leckey” dated 1723 on verso of title. The dedication says this work is by P. Pellisson, who wrote the history of the French Academy, also translated by Some.. The author said to be either Paul Pellisson-Fontanier, or his elder brother George Pellisson. Henry Some, the translator, died young, and there are three commendatory verses upon him at the beginning of this book.

The fifty-one “divers problems” which are, on the whole, still intriguing, e.g.: after the prefatory material, which ”  To this, Reader, let me tell you, that in some places indeed, the obscurity of my matter hath given me licence to make bold conjectures, and such as seem ed to me more likely to add Beauty than Light to my work: But that these places aie very rare, and that everywhere else I have laboured to give only solid reasons, and have we are apt for this reason to esteem them vain and f rivilous. But, Reader, I am not of this judgement, nay on the contrary

And here are some of my favorite “problems”

Whence comes it that Beasts do know naturally how to swim, and that Man hath need to learn?

What is the reason that the lowest Spirits are commonly most perswarded of the truth of their opinions? What is the reason that Fear makes ones hear [i.e. hair] stand on end? What are the causes of the marvellous things we observe in the Silk-worm?

What is the reason that Praises make a man blush?

Whence proceed the excessive Heats of the moneth of August, and the other effects which are attributed to the Dog-star?

Whence comes the custom of making fire- works And- shooting off Guns , either when a Peace is made  or after a victory, or at the entrance of . Princes ‘into some City, or upon other.

Why do we laugh in seeing a thing very Ul-favoured, since that which de-lights the mind, one would think, ought to have in it some perfection .

As for the ‘answers of these Problems, here is a quite interesting one:

What is the reason that Children in Winter, though their face and hands seem to show that they’ are more afflicted with cold than men grown , yet are not easily perswaded to warm themselves ?  Is it not because to warm themselves they must stand still a good while in the fame place, and that Children love to be constantly in motion, out of a kind of Impatience, which is natural to our spirit at that age? Or else is it, that when they are cold and come nigh to the fire is heat at first instead of comforting,, it doth more afflict them which happens, because it re-inforcech at first the cold of their bodies by Antiperistasis ; and that as they want experience and reason, and follow the first sentiment of nature, they reject this wholsom remedy for want of knowledge to judge , that by and by they shall find comfort by it ? Or else is it, that though their bodies be more easily altered by the cold, then those of full grown men, as it is plain to the eye ; yet this alteration is not so painful and grievous to them ; the reason of it is, because the cold hurts chiefly by too much hardening and making stiff all the parts of our body, and that theirs are so tender and so soft, that by reason thereof, they cannot but very hardly be brought into the contrary extream?

Wing P1108 (; nine locations in ESTC)

Belle da Costa Green!

The Morgan Library, which occupies a large complex on New York’s Madison Avenue, is known internationally as one of the finest collections of books and manuscripts in the world. It was founded in 1906 to house the private library of legendary financier J. P. Morgan, who began to accumulate rare books, illuminated manuscripts, incunabula and […]

via Belle da Costa Greene —

An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting

JANE COLLIER,  1714-1755

 

An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting; with Proper Rules for the Exercise of that Amusing Study…with some general instructions for plaguing all your acquaintance.

 

Art_of_Ingeniously_Tormenting2
“The Cat doth play,/ And after slay.”

London, A Millar, 1757.                                                       $2,900

8vo, pp [2], iii, [1], 234, etched frontispiece [of a cat tormenting a mouse, after Hogarth], bound in contemporary polished calf, spine gilt with raised bands,  spine slightly cracked and chipped at ends, but a clean sound copy,

SECOND EDITION ‘corrected’, with the ‘advertisement to the reader’ added;, one of the classic satires of the 18th Century, the work of a female friend of Samuel Richardson. Porkington Library bookplate with 19th Century signature of Mary Jane Ormsby, a much painted beauty married to the Irish MP William Ormsby-Gore.

Wickedly funny and bitingly satirical, The Art is a comedy of manners that gives insights into eighteenth-century behavior as well as the timeless art of emotional abuse. It is also an advice book, a handbook of anti-etiquette, and a comedy of manners. Collier describes methods for “teasing and mortifying” one’s intimates and acquaintances in a variety of social situations. Written primarily for wives, mothers, and the mistresses of servants, it suggests the difficulties women experienced exerting their influence in private and public life–and the ways they got round them. As such, The Art provides a fascinating glimpse into eighteenth-century daily life.swift-tormenting6.jpgAn Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting was a conduct book written by Jane Collier and published in 1753. The Essay was Collier’s first work, and operates as a satirical advice book on how to nag. It was modelled after Jonathan Swift’s satirical essays, and is intended to “teach” a reader the various methods for “teasing and mortifying” one’s acquaintances. It is divided into two sections that are organised for “advice” to specific groups, and it is followed by “General Rules” for all people to follow.

Although the work was written by Jane Collier, there are speculations as to who may have helped contribute to the content and style of the work, ranging from friends to fellow writers such as Sarah Fielding, Samuel Richardson and James Harris. There was only one edition printed during Collier’s life, but there were many subsequent revisions and republications of the work

In 1748, Collier was living with her brother Arthur in London. The conditions were not suitable, and she became the governess for Samuel Richardson’s daughter, Patty, by 1750.  Richardson was impressed by her understanding of Latin and Greek along with her ability to perform her domestic duties.   During this time, Collier was living with Sarah Fielding, and Richardson would spend time discussing writing with them.

It was under Richardson’s employment that she wrote An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting.   It has been suggested that Richardson helped Collier write the work, but Richardson’s lack of satirical skill has dispelled such ideas.

Instead, it was probably James Harris and Fielding who helped craft the satire, and all three probably helped to edit the work.  However, most of Collier’s help came from Fielding, who was a close friend and shared many of her earlier works with Collier.

The first edition was printed by Richardson for Andrew Millar in 1753.  A second edition of the Essay was published by Millar in 1757, two years after Collier’s death, but with revisions made by her shortly after its first printing.  Subsequently editions and revisions were published in 1795, 1804, 1805, 1806, 1808, 1809 and 1811.

The Essay is modelled on Jonathan Swift’s satire Instructions to Servants (1746), and even mentions Swift directly, but Collier reverses the roles in Swift’s satire and instead writes from a servant’s perspective in the first book.  All of her suggestions are to aid in the process of “teasing and mortifying”.

She begins her work with an actual “Essay on the Art of Tormenting” that serves as an introduction, before dividing the book into two parts. In this introduction, the narrator claims:

“One strong objection, I know, will be made against my whole design, by people of weak consciences; which is, that every rule I shall lay down will be exactly opposite to the doctrine of Christianity. Greatly, indeed, in a Christian country, should I fear the forces of such an objection, could I perceive, that any one vice was refrained from on that account only. Both theft and murder are forbidden by God himself: yet can anyone say, that our lives and properties would be in the least secure, were it not for the penal laws of our country?”

 

Part the First is divided into four sections: “Instructions to Masters and Mistresses, concerning their Servants”, “To the Patronesses of an Humble Companion”, “To Parents” and “To the Husband”. To the master and mistresses, the narrator claims that “you are no true lover of the noble game of Tormenting, if a good dinner, or any other convenience or enjoyment, can give you half the pleasure, as the teasing and mortifying a good industrious servant, who has done her very best to please you.”

 

Part the Second is divided into four sections: “To Lovers”, “To the Wife”, “To the Friend” and “To your Good Sort of People; being an appendage to the foregoing chapter”. To wives, she tells them to “Be out of humour when your husband brings company home: be angry, if he goes abroad without you; and troublesome, if he takes you with him.” When speaking to friends, she argues that “injuries go nearest to us, that we neither deserve nor expect”.

 

Added to the work are “General Rules for plaguing all your acquaintance; with the description of a party of pleasure” along with a “Conclusion” and “A Fable”. As a general rule, the narrator says, “By all means avoid an evenness of behaviour. Be, sometimes, extremely glad to see people; and, at other times, let your behaviour be hardly within the rules of good breeding”

 

Most of her contemporaries had only good things to say about the work. Henry Fielding complimented Collier on the work by declaring she had “an Understanding more than Female, mixed with virtues almost more than human”.  This line was part of a greater poem written by Fielding and inscribed on a copy of his favourite book of Horace.  This was one of Fielding’s last actions before he left for Lisbon, where he died shortly after.

 

Later, Betty Rizzo described the work as the “best-known generic satire written in the eighteenth century by a woman”.

Martin and Ruthe Battestin stated that Collier was “an author of wit and spirit”

Some critics find it interesting that Collier would “yoke” Richardson with those that he “felt especial antipathy” with: Swift and Fielding.

Craik describes the work as “a courageous social satire published at a time when satires were usually written by and for men”.

 

 

 

An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting

JANE COLLIER,  1714-1755

 

An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting; with Proper Rules for the Exercise of that Amusing Study…with some general instructions for plaguing all your acquaintance.

 

Art_of_Ingeniously_Tormenting2
“The Cat doth play,/ And after slay.”

London, A Millar, 1757.                                                       SOLD

8vo, pp [2], iii, [1], 234, etched frontispiece [of a cat tormenting a mouse, after Hogarth], bound in contemporary polished calf, spine gilt with raised bands,  spine slightly cracked and chipped at ends, but a clean sound copy,

SECOND EDITION ‘corrected’, with the ‘advertisement to the reader’ added;, one of the classic satires of the 18th Century, the work of a female friend of Samuel Richardson. Porkington Library bookplate with 19th Century signature of Mary Jane Ormsby, a much painted beauty married to the Irish MP William Ormsby-Gore.

Wickedly funny and bitingly satirical, The Art is a comedy of manners that gives insights into eighteenth-century behavior as well as the timeless art of emotional abuse. It is also an advice book, a handbook of anti-etiquette, and a comedy of manners. Collier describes methods for “teasing and mortifying” one’s intimates and acquaintances in a variety of social situations. Written primarily for wives, mothers, and the mistresses of servants, it suggests the difficulties women experienced exerting their influence in private and public life–and the ways they got round them. As such, The Art provides a fascinating glimpse into eighteenth-century daily life.swift-tormenting6.jpgAn Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting was a conduct book written by Jane Collier and published in 1753. The Essay was Collier’s first work, and operates as a satirical advice book on how to nag. It was modelled after Jonathan Swift’s satirical essays, and is intended to “teach” a reader the various methods for “teasing and mortifying” one’s acquaintances. It is divided into two sections that are organised for “advice” to specific groups, and it is followed by “General Rules” for all people to follow.

Although the work was written by Jane Collier, there are speculations as to who may have helped contribute to the content and style of the work, ranging from friends to fellow writers such as Sarah Fielding, Samuel Richardson and James Harris. There was only one edition printed during Collier’s life, but there were many subsequent revisions and republications of the work

In 1748, Collier was living with her brother Arthur in London. The conditions were not suitable, and she became the governess for Samuel Richardson’s daughter, Patty, by 1750.  Richardson was impressed by her understanding of Latin and Greek along with her ability to perform her domestic duties.   During this time, Collier was living with Sarah Fielding, and Richardson would spend time discussing writing with them.

It was under Richardson’s employment that she wrote An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting.   It has been suggested that Richardson helped Collier write the work, but Richardson’s lack of satirical skill has dispelled such ideas.

Instead, it was probably James Harris and Fielding who helped craft the satire, and all three probably helped to edit the work.  However, most of Collier’s help came from Fielding, who was a close friend and shared many of her earlier works with Collier.

The first edition was printed by Richardson for Andrew Millar in 1753.  A second edition of the Essay was published by Millar in 1757, two years after Collier’s death, but with revisions made by her shortly after its first printing.  Subsequently editions and revisions were published in 1795, 1804, 1805, 1806, 1808, 1809 and 1811.

The Essay is modelled on Jonathan Swift’s satire Instructions to Servants (1746), and even mentions Swift directly, but Collier reverses the roles in Swift’s satire and instead writes from a servant’s perspective in the first book.  All of her suggestions are to aid in the process of “teasing and mortifying”.

She begins her work with an actual “Essay on the Art of Tormenting” that serves as an introduction, before dividing the book into two parts. In this introduction, the narrator claims:

“One strong objection, I know, will be made against my whole design, by people of weak consciences; which is, that every rule I shall lay down will be exactly opposite to the doctrine of Christianity. Greatly, indeed, in a Christian country, should I fear the forces of such an objection, could I perceive, that any one vice was refrained from on that account only. Both theft and murder are forbidden by God himself: yet can anyone say, that our lives and properties would be in the least secure, were it not for the penal laws of our country?”

 

Part the First is divided into four sections: “Instructions to Masters and Mistresses, concerning their Servants”, “To the Patronesses of an Humble Companion”, “To Parents” and “To the Husband”. To the master and mistresses, the narrator claims that “you are no true lover of the noble game of Tormenting, if a good dinner, or any other convenience or enjoyment, can give you half the pleasure, as the teasing and mortifying a good industrious servant, who has done her very best to please you.”

 

Part the Second is divided into four sections: “To Lovers”, “To the Wife”, “To the Friend” and “To your Good Sort of People; being an appendage to the foregoing chapter”. To wives, she tells them to “Be out of humour when your husband brings company home: be angry, if he goes abroad without you; and troublesome, if he takes you with him.” When speaking to friends, she argues that “injuries go nearest to us, that we neither deserve nor expect”.

 

Added to the work are “General Rules for plaguing all your acquaintance; with the description of a party of pleasure” along with a “Conclusion” and “A Fable”. As a general rule, the narrator says, “By all means avoid an evenness of behaviour. Be, sometimes, extremely glad to see people; and, at other times, let your behaviour be hardly within the rules of good breeding”

 

Most of her contemporaries had only good things to say about the work. Henry Fielding complimented Collier on the work by declaring she had “an Understanding more than Female, mixed with virtues almost more than human”.  This line was part of a greater poem written by Fielding and inscribed on a copy of his favourite book of Horace.  This was one of Fielding’s last actions before he left for Lisbon, where he died shortly after.

 

Later, Betty Rizzo described the work as the “best-known generic satire written in the eighteenth century by a woman”.

Martin and Ruthe Battestin stated that Collier was “an author of wit and spirit”

Some critics find it interesting that Collier would “yoke” Richardson with those that he “felt especial antipathy” with: Swift and Fielding.

Craik describes the work as “a courageous social satire published at a time when satires were usually written by and for men”.

 

 

 

Nice choices of Images

A guest blog post by Jarkko Tanninen, History of Art Junior Honours student on work placement in Special Collections. I was fortunate to be selected for an eight-week long work placement at the University of Glasgow Library’s Special Collections department, part of Archives and Special Collections, with the aim of gaining valuable skills in research […]

via Seeing the Reformation: Religion and the Printed Image in Early Modern Europe. — University of Glasgow Library

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: