-) 1 (-

564J. Albertus de Padua (1282-1328): and Pseudo-Nicolaus de Dinkelsbühl (1360-1433)

Expositio evangeliorum dominicalium et festivalium. Add: Nicolaus de Dinkelsbuel: Concordantia in passionem dominicam.

Ulm : Johann Zainer, ‘about’ 15 June 1480. 

 (The colophon reads circa festum sancti Viti)    Price $21,000

Certainly one of my favorite type faces!

Chancery folio: 31½ x 21 ½ cm. signatures: [a12 b–q8 r6+1 s–z8 A–T8 U10 X Y8 Z aa10].   This copy is bound in full contemporary calf over wooden boards with an arabesque or vine decoration, as commonly found on Zainer printed books. And a circular stamp of a stag or elk or deer.   One metal clasp of two remains and with the catches are stamped “AVE”  This book has a very early rebacking, and both the front and rear  paste downs are leaves from a German incunabule.  Probably bound at the workshop named Zu of  Ulm  Adler by Schwenke/Schunke feating the tool Blattwerk 511.  Binding EBDB s013420, Kyriss 080 (round stamp with Stag.) 

 In terms of printing history, the work is remarkable for the clearly visible textile impressions on several sheets, which are a consequence of a printing method which makes use of moist textile sheets, a technical specialty which resulted in an improved printing quality, this method was predominantly used by Johann Zainer  

 This copy has several  other interesting contemporary particularities: Ca. 4 sheets in a somewhat smaller size and paper quality,   (cf. A. Schulte, Über das Feuchten des Papiers mit nassen Tüchern bei Joh. Zainer; in Gutenberg-Jb. 1941, pp. 19-22)

Further more the Paste downs are made of single side printings of leaves from the Spiegel des Sünders printed by Johann Zainers brother Günther Zainer in Augsberg (not Ulm) [about 50 mi/82km] There is also a handprint of someone from the time of printing.  

With the Provenance “pro Conventu fratrum Minoru(m) Franciscacanoru(m) Reformatoru(M) Bolzanesium” Franciscan convent Bolzano, Tyrol, Italy 

∞∞ The Paste Downs are leafs  2r & 11r each printed on one side only from the Spiegel des Sünders.

Us location BPL only Digital reproductions:  urn:nbn:de:bvb:12-bsb00032031-1  

is00675000.   Imprint[Augsburg : Günther Zainer, about 1478]

Format 8°.  Goff S675; H 14946*; Schr 5286; E. Freys, Makulatur aus der Presse Günther Zainers, in Gb Jb 1944/45, p. 96; Günt(L) 188; Ohly-Sack 2576; BSB-Ink S-519; GW M43109

Goff A340; Hain: H *574; & (Concordantia only H* 11762); Zehnacker 99; Polain(B) 101; IGI 243; SI 65; IBP 175; IBE 215; CCIR A-34; Coll(S) 34; Coll(U) 55; Madsen 101; Šimáková-Vrchotka 48, 49, 50; Martín Abad A-61; Walsh 904, S-904; Bod-inc A-094; Sheppard 1819; Pr 2523; BMC II 526; BSB-Ink A-133GW 785

Digital reproductions. Electronic facsimile : Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München

Chancery folio: 31½ x 21 ½ cm. signatures: [a12 b–q8 r6+1 s–z8 A–T8 U10 X Y8 Z aa10].   This copy is bound in full contemporary calf over wooden boards with an arabesque or vine decoration, as commonly found on Zainer printed books. And a circular stamp of a stag or elk or deer.   One metal clasp of two remains and with the catches are stamped “AVE”  This book has a very early rebacking, and both the front and rear  paste downs are leaves from a German incunabule.  Probably bound at the workshop named Zu of  Ulm  Adler by Schwenke/Schunke feating the tool Blattwerk 511.  Binding EBDB s013420, Kyriss 080 (round stamp with Stag.) 

 In terms of printing history, the work is remarkable for the clearly visible textile impressions on several sheets, which are a consequence of a printing method which makes use of moist textile sheets, a technical specialty which resulted in an improved printing quality, this method was predominantly used by Johann Zainer  

 This copy has several  other interesting contemporary particularities: Ca. 4 sheets in a somewhat smaller size and paper quality,   (cf. A. Schulte, Über das Feuchten des Papiers mit nassen Tüchern bei Joh. Zainer; in Gutenberg-Jb. 1941, pp. 19-22)

Further more the Paste downs are made of single side printings of leaves from the Spiegel des Sünders printed by Johann Zainers brother Günther Zainer in Augsberg (not Ulm) [about 50 mi/82km] There is also a handprint of someone from the time of printing.  

With the Provenance “pro Conventu fratrum Minoru(m) Franciscacanoru(m) Reformatoru(M) Bolzanesium” Franciscan convent Bolzano, Tyrol, Italy 

Paste Down are leafs  2r & 11r each printed on one side only from the Spiegel des Sünders.

Us location BPL only

Digital reproductions:  urn:nbn:de:bvb:12-bsb00032031-1  

is00675000.   Imprint[Augsburg : Günther Zainer, about 1478]

Format 8°?.  Goff S675; H 14946*; Schr 5286; E. Freys, Makulatur aus der Presse Günther Zainers, in Gb Jb 1944/45, p. 96; Günt(L) 188; Ohly-Sack 2576; BSB-Ink S-519; GW M43109

Goff A340; Hain: H *574; & (Concordantia only H* 11762); Zehnacker 99; Polain(B) 101; IGI 243; SI 65; IBP 175; IBE 215; CCIR A-34; Coll(S) 34; Coll(U) 55; Madsen 101; Šimáková-Vrchotka 48, 49, 50; Martín Abad A-61; Walsh 904, S-904; Bod-inc A-094; Sheppard 1819; Pr 2523; BMC II 526; BSB-Ink A-133GW 785

Digital reproductions. Electronic facsimile : Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München

)2(

601J

Pseudo-Augustine; Saint Augustine 354-430; Bernard of Claravallensis 1090-1153; Peter Damian 1007-1072; Saint Anselm of Canterbury, 1033-1109; Vincent Ferrer 1350-1419; Maffeo Vegio 1407-1458; Pope Pius II,(Enea Silvio Bartolomeo Piccolomini) 1405-1464,

Medtationes divi Augustini episcopi Hyppoensis Soliloquia eivsden Manuale eidsdem Castigaissime. [a1

Brescia: Angelus Britannicus de Pallazolo Biblioteca Virtual del Patrimonio Bibliograìfico.  8 Oct. 1498                                                                   $8,000

Octavo,14 1/4 x 10 Cm.  Signatures: π4, a-n8, o10, l8, m12, p8  (quire k is signed kk and is ignored by the register, which comprises only quires a-o.). Second edition Bound in later full vellum.

Here are the contents:

Title and list of contents π1r; Title page,a1r

      1)[Pseudo-] Augustinus [Pseudo- Anselmus; Jean de Fécamp]. Meditationes, caption “Invocatio dei omnipotentis ad morum et vite reparationem”, The invocation of the Almighty God for the reparation of character and life.

      2) a2r-e5r; [Pseudo-] Augustinus. Meditationes,

      3) e5r-i3r; [Pseudo-] Augustinus. Soliloquia, 

      4) i3r-kkv [i.e. l1v],  Manuale including preface, i3r-v; [Pseudo-Bernardus Claravallensis    .               [i.e. Hugo de Sancto Victore]. Meditationes de cognitione humanae conditionis,

      5)  l2r-m8v; [Pseudo-] Bernardus Claravallensis. Epistola de perfectione vitae,

      6) n1r-n2r; Petrus Damiani. Sermo [i.e Institutio monialis, chapt. 6],( De Institutione monialis, which had the aim of safeguarding Western Christians from the decadent uses of the East. Notable in this work, among other things, Damiani, then Bishop of Ostia, condemned Maria Argyre’s use of a golden fork to eat. ‘Forks were a new invention at the time.)

       7) n2v-n3r; Anselmus Cantuariensis. Meditatio de redemptione generis humani, 

       8) n3v-n7r; Anselmus Cantuariensis. Orationes ad sanctam Mariam virginem, 

       9) n7r-o7v; Father N. Laudensis [Maphae9us Vegius? Jacobus Arrigoni Laudensis?]. [Verse], incipit “Mens mea q[ui]d cogitas? Quid tantis / ceca procellis / Sponte tuam credis mox peritura ratem?”, “My mind, what are you thinking? Why are you so blind / blind to the storm / Do you automatically believe that your rate will soon perish?”

       10-18):8, elegiac distichs, o8r; Pius II, Pont. Max. In laudem divi Augustini, o8r-v; Maphaeus Vegius. Epigramma in laudem Monicae, o8v-o9v; colophon, ov; printer’s device, o9v; Vincentius Ferrerius. De vita spirituali [also known as De interiori homine formativus], 

       19) ²l1r-²m11v; [Pseudo-] Bernardus Claravallensis. Sermo de passione domini, p1r-p7v.

This is a collection o

Goff A1294; HC(Add) 1951; IGI 1013; Sajó-Soltész 406; IBE 126; IBPort 35; Madsen 442; Schmitt II 2828,15; Hubay(Eichstätt) 110; Oates 2628; Pr 6998; BMC VII 980; BSB- Ink L-136; GW 2972 (Pseudo-Augustinus)

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern IrelandLondon, British Library (IA.31165) (Incomplete. Wanting the first, unsigned quire with title and table, and quire p with the Sermo de passione domini)

Cambridge, University Library

United States of America

Baltimore MD, The Walters Art Museum Library

Collection of the late Phyllis and John Gordan, New York NY

Free Library of Philadelphia, Copinger-Widener Collection

Pennsylvania State Univ.

San Marino CA, Huntington Library

Stanford Univ. Library Chicago, The Newberry Library

New Haven CT, Yale University, Beinecke Library

)-3-(

William of Auxerre (aka Guillermus Altissodorensis, c.1150-1231

The first medieval theologian to develop a systematic treatise on Free will,the Virtues, and the Natural law.

586J   Guillermus Altissodorensis, c.1150-1231 (sometimes also called William of Beauvai or Auxerre)

Summa aurea in quattuor libros sententiarum :  a subtilissimo doctore Magistro Guillermo altissiodore[n]si edita. quam nuper amendis q[uam]plurimis doctissimus sacre theologie professor magister Guillermus de quercu diligenti admodum castigatione emendauit ac tabulam huic pernecessariam edidit .

Impressa est Parisiis: Maxima Philippi Pigoucheti cura impensis vero Nicolai vaultier et Durandi gerlier alme vniuersitatis Parisiensis librariorum iuratorum, 3 Apr. 1500.                                $25,000

Folio, 28.5 x 20.5 cm. Signatures a–z &,ç8 A–M⁸N¹⁰AB⁶C⁸.  First edition. Large woodcut device (Davies 82) on title, Durand Gerlier’s woodcut device (Davies 119) within 4-part border at end. Gothic types, double column.  signatures:  There are some old manuscript marginalia.  Bound in contemporary calf over wooden boards. Two beautiful initials in gold, green, blue and lavender .

First edition  of the major work by William of Auxerre. In this commentary on Peter Lombard, William treats creation, natural law, the nature of man, a tripartite God, usury, end the Last Judgment, among other topics. He applies the critical reasoning of classical philosophy to that of scholastic philosophy.  He was an Archdeacon of Beauvais before becoming a professor of theology at the university in Paris. 

 

William of Auxerre’s  Summa Aurea, contains an ample disquisition on usury and the natural law basis of economic matters. His Summa Aurea still shows a debt to Peter Lombard, yet it advances his ontological argument, furthermore it shows inovation and an intellectual awareness and insistence on the physical that had not been seen earlier. The “Summa Aurea”, which is not, as it is sometimes described, a mere compendium of the “Books of Sentences” by Peter the Lombard. 

  Both in method and in content it shows a considerable amount of originality, although, like all the Summæ of the early thirteenth century, it is influenced by the manner and method of the Lombard. It discusses many problems neglected by the Lombard and passes over others. It is divided into four books:  The One and True God (bk. 1); creation, angels, and man (bk. 2); Christ and the virtues (bk. 3); Sacraments and the four last things (bk. 4). The Summa aurea had extraordinary influence on contemporary authors, such as Alexander of Hales and Hugh of Saint–Cher, and on later scholastics, such as St. Albertus Magnus, St. Thomas Aquinas, and St. Bonaventure.     The teacher by whom William was most profoundly influenced was Praepositinus, or Prevostin, of Cremona, Chancellor of the University of Paris from 1206 to 1209.  

The names of teacher and pupil are mentioned in the same sentence by St. Thomas: Haec est opinio Praepositini et Autissiodorensis (in I Sent., XV, q. 11). William was, in turn, the teacher of the Dominican, John of Treviso, one of the first theologians of the Order of Preachers. The importance of the “Summa Aurea” is enhanced by the fact that it was one of the first Summæ composed after the introduction of the metaphysical and physical treatises of Aristotle. 

William of Auxerre, is considered the first medieval writer to develop a systematic treatise on free will and the natural law.  Probably a student of the Parisian canon and humanist Richard of St. Victor, William became a Master in theology and later an administrator at the University of Paris. After a long career at the university, he was commissioned in 1230 to serve as French envoy to Pope Gregory IX to advise Gregory on dissension at the university. William pleaded the cause of the students against the complaints of King Louis IX.

In 1231 William was appointed by Gregory to a three-member council to censor the works of Aristotle included in the university curriculum to make them conform sufficiently to Christian teaching. Contrary to the papal legate Robert of Courçon and other conservatives, who in 1210 condemned Aristotle’s Physics and Metaphysics as corruptive of Christian faith, William saw no intrinsic reason to avoid the rational analysis of Christian revelation. Confident of William’s orthodoxy, Gregory urged the King to restore him to the university faculty so that he and Godfrey of Poitiers might reorganize the plan of studies. William fell ill and died before any of these projects were begu

William’s emphasis on philosophy as a tool for Christian theology is evidenced by his critique of Plato’s doctrine of a demiurge, or cosmic intelligence, and by his treatment of the theory of knowledge as a means for distinguishing between God and creation. He also analyzed certain moral questions, including the problem of human choice and the nature of virtue. His fame rests largely on the Summa aurea, written between 1215 and 1220 and published many times (Paris, n.d.; 1500; 1518; Venice 1591). Inspired by the Sentences of peter lombard, preceding as he did the Aristotelian revival, William was largely influenced by St. Augustine, St. Anselm of Canterbury, Richard and Hugh of saint–victor, and Avicenna.. (J. Ribaillier, ed., Magistri Guillelmi Altissiodorensis Summa aurea, 7 vols. (Paris 1980–1987). Gilson, History of Christian Philosophy in the Middle Ages (New York 1955) 656–657. P. Glorieux, Répertoire des maîtres en théologie de Paris au XIIIe siècle (Paris 1933–34); C. Ottaviano, Guglielmo d’Auxerre …: La vita, le opere, il pensiero (Rome 1929). r. m. martineau, “Le Plan de la Summa aurea de Guillaume d’Auxerre,” Études et recherches d’Ottawa 1 (1937) 79–114

Goff G718; ISTC: ig00707500; Hain-Copinger 8324; BMC. VIII.122;  GW 11861; Polain B1787; Oates 3078; IGI Fabritius, Bibl. Latina, ed. 1754, III/p. 139). S.T.C. French Books, p. 213.  Us copies: Astrik L. Gabriel, Notre Dame IN, Boston Public, Bryn Mawr, Columbia, Huntington, Univ.of Chicago, Univ. of Wisconsin. |(also see my fascicule XIX, 2019: #1 for another copy of this edition now in private ownership)    586J Guillermus de Auxerre 1500  https://data.cerl.org/istc/ig00707500

)•4•(

3) 566J. Thomas Aquinas  Pseudo ; 1225-1274 Erroneously attributed to Aquinas. Compiled from works by Jacobus de Fusignano (ca. 1333)  and that attributed to Henricus de Hassia (T.M. Charland, Artes praedicandi, Paris, 1936, p.87) (CIBN) 

Tractatulus solennis de arte [et] vero modo p[rae]dicandi. ex diuersis sacro[rum] doctorum scripturis. Et principaliter sacratissimi xp[ist]iane ecclesie doctoris Thome de Aquino. ex p[ar]uo suo quoda[m] tractatulo recollectus. vbi s[ecundu]m modu[m] [et] formam materie presentis procedit. Una cu[m] tractatulo eximij doctoris Henrici de hassia de arte predicandi sequitur vt infra

Straßburg  Printer of the ‘Casus Breves Decretalium’ (Georg Husner?), ±1493?  

 Or  [Köln] Heinrich Quentell, about 1489-92]  

 Or Deventer [Jacobus de Breda?] Campbell’s ascription, which is followed by Goff and Camp-

Kron. But this is rejected by HPT.              Price $ 13,000

Quarto 20×14 cm. Signatures: AA-BB (BB6 blank) & A8 The tract by  Heinrich von Langenstein is not a separate printing although Hain catalogues it as such ?

ISTC it00272000. CIBN; T-193; HC; 1355 bound with (HC 8397) IG; 2586; GW; M46053;   ISTC locates only one US copy, Huntington. 

Internet Access: https://data.cerl.org/istc/it00272000

 http://www.gesamtkatalogderwiegendrucke.de/docs/M46053.htm

]5[

563J Thomas Aquinas

Quaestiones circa confessionem seu Sacramentum poenitentiae.

 [Rome : Johann Besicken, about 1493-94].  Collijn assigns this to Guldinbeck.                          $12,800

Octavo 19 x 13.5 cm Signatures : a8 Fol. 8 blank and present. Old bibliographies assigned this to Plannck, later revised to Besicken. 

VERY RARE ISTC cites only 9 copies; 1 in the US at Yale.

Besicken worked at Basel in 1483, and at Rome from 1493 until 1510, partly with various partners. Most of the woodcut capitals employed by Besicken and his partners are black ground capitals some with foliage decorations and others with branch-work; all enclosed in a frame line which form squares in the corners. The present incunable has such an example on a1. His imprints are generally rare.

Reference works.  Goff T325; R 395; Mich 341; IBE 1729; IGI 3151; IBP 1681; SI 3781; Coll(S) 1410; Martín Abad T-106; Borm 810; GW 7350

https://data.cerl.org/istc/it00325000

]6[

565J.  Phillipus  Beroaldus.

Declamatio lepidissima ebriosi scortatoris aleatoris de uitiositate disceptantium

Impressum Bononiæ a Benedicto Hectoris diligenter & emẽdate,1499                  Price $15,000

Quarto 20 x 10 cm  Signatures: a-b⁸ c⁴.

Imprint from colophon, which reads in full: Impressum Bononiae a Benedicto Hectoris Diligenter & eme[n]date Anno Salutis Milesimo undequingentesimo. Illus[trissimo] Io[hannes] Ben[tivolio] Reipu[blicae] Bononiensis habenas feliciter modera[n]te./ 

The Initial spaces with printed guide letters; ha large Lombard initials supplied in red.  printed marginalia.  Printer’s device and register on final leaf. 

This book is a Facetious declamation, dedicated to Sigismond Gossinger, canon of Breslau. It features a drunkard, a debauchee and a gambler arguing over who among them is the most vicious and will be deprived of the paternal inheritance.

4131Proctor did not distinguish between Goff B471 and B472

Reference works. Goff B471; H 2965*; Klebs 184.1; Pell 2220; CIBN B-344; Lefèvre 86; Parguez 173; Polain(B) 618; IBE 971; IGI 1589; IBP 960; SI 685; Sajó-Soltész 590; Sallander 1621; Madsen 648; Šimáková-Vrchotka 315, 316; Martín Abad B-103; Hubay(Augsburg) 347; Hubay(Eichstätt) 174; Sack(Freiburg) 593; Borm 426; Oates 2501; Rhodes(Oxford Colleges) 333; Bod-inc B-222; Sheppard 5398; Pr 6644; BSB-Ink B-370; GW 4130

∞§∞

]=7=[

545J Charles VII, King of France (1403-1461) Commentary by C. Guymier.

(Pragmatica sanctio, 7 July 1438 (Comm: Cosma Guymier) Pragmatica sanctio Caroli VII. regis Francorum, seu Decreta Basiliensia necnon Bituricensia (IX.Kal.Apr.[24 mar.]1436; VII Iul.1438)

Imp[re]ssa[que] Lugd. partiu[m] Francie amenissima vrbe : [Per] Nicolau[m] Philippi alemanu[m] artis imp[re]ssorie magistru[m], 6 September 1488,.                                                   Price $4,000

Quarto     Signatures: a-z⁸ & ⁸ (final leaf blank) – Lacks quire k, leaves t2 and final blank; (182) leaves., rubricated in red, woodcut printer’s mark in red on final text leaf. All of the text is water stained in lower and outer (mostly blank) margin; upper blank margin cut short (loss of later added manuscripts. pagination); final ±30 leaves worm holed in outer and inner margin, with some loss of letters; leaf v4 lacks sm. portion upper blank margin; later manuscript annotations in pen and ink on verso and recto of 1st and final leaf and a few scattered annotations in blank margins. Bound in later quarter calf over boards.

This is a very rare edition of the Pragamatic Sanctions of Bourges, issued on 7 July 1438. This decree in effect created the Gallican church and declared the French king the prime regent and resulted in the usurpation of the papal power in France.

On  July 7, 1438  King Charles VII of France issued  this decree  after an assembly had examined the decrees of the Council of Basel.  It approved the decree Sacrosancta of the council, which asserted the supremacy of a council over the pope, and established the “liberties” of the Gallican Church, restricting the rights of the pope and in many cases making his jurisdiction subject to the will of the king. Revoked by Louis XI in 1461 but in 1499 Louis XII by explicit declaration renewed the enforcement of the sanction. The Pragmatic Sanction was ultimately superseded by the Concordat of Bologna, negotiated by Francis I and Pope Leo X in 1516.

Both parties, Pope and council, now sought the support of the secular powers. It was to the interest of these to prevent a new schism and not to permit the complete failure of the reforms of Basle. The position of France in regard to these questions was to be discussed at a national council that King Charles VII commanded to meet at Bourges in May, 1438. This council declared itself neutral in the dispute between the pope and the synod,  but accepted the greater part of the Basle decrees on reform, modifying some on account of the special conditions in France; these changes were made with the expectation that the council would ratify the modifications. On 7 July, 1438, the king issued a decree, the Pragmatic Sanction, in which he accepted the decisions and ordered the observance of them. Essentially it contains the tenets of the supremacy of an ecumenical council over the pope, of the regular holding of general councils, and of the limitation of papal reservations and demands of tribute. The suppression of annates by the Council of Basle was added, but with the modification that a fifth of the former tax was conceded to the papal see.By this edict the French king issued a law of the secular legislative authority in purely ecclesiastical affairs. The recognition of the authority of the Council of Basle was only formal, for the validity of its decisions in France rested solely upon theedict of the king. As the law was recorded in the Parliaments these, especially the Parliament of Paris, received the right of interfering in the internal affairs of the Church. In addition, no attention had been paid to the pope, consequently every 

effort was made at Rome to have the law set aside. Pius II (1458-64) declared it an infringement of the rights of the papal see, and called upon the French bishops to aid in its suppression. Charles VII appealed against this to a general council. His successor Louis XI promised the pope to repeal the sanction, but the Parliament of Paris and the university resisted, and the king let the matter drop. In 1499 Louis XII by explicit declaration renewed the enforcement of the sanction. 

ISTC  No.ic00211000; Goff C211; GW,; M16114; PML 79111; IGI,; VI 2526-A; BSB-Ink C-256.050; GW M16114; Frasson-Cochet 92; Péligry 265; Parguez 325; Castan(Besançon) 304. 

United States :

 The Morgan Library  ( ex CFB),

The Newberry Library

Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library (-)

∞ 8 ∞

The Letters of Ficino 1497

The Letters of Marsilio Ficino represent an essential core of his thought and influence as a chief architect of the Platonic and Hermetic revival, the philosophical and revelatory center of the new learning that was revamping religious vision and humanistic enquiry Italian Renaissance.

525J Marsilio Ficino 1433-1499


Epistolae Marsilii Ficini Florentini.

[Nuremberg] : Per Antonium Koberger impræsse,  1497. Price $30,000

Imprint from colophon./ 

Chancery quarto 15 x 10cm. . Signatures: π¹⁰,A-Z⁸ a-g⁸ h⁴(lacking blank leaf h4); Errors in folation: D2 signed C2; G2 unsigned, G4and G5 signed G3 and G4. Final leaf blank and wanting. Colophon reads: Marsilii Ficini Florentini eloquentissimi viri epistolae familiares per Antonium Koberger impraesse anno incarnate deitatis Mccccxcviixxiiii Februarii finiunt foeliciter./ Place of publication suggested by ISTC.

This copy is bound in seventh century, full vellum. With filled initial spaces, printed guide letters, foliation, without catchwords, The first initial letter is Illuminiated with colours on gilt background with tendrils and an arabesque on margin, red and blue initial letters. There is quite a bit of contemporary  marginalia and underlining. There is an ownership  note from the XVII century handwritten on title-front. Restoration on foot of spine, some damp staining. This copy is better than most of the copies that I have seen in person and online.

                   Paul Oskar Kristeller makes clear below that the Letters of Marsilio Ficino represent an essential core of his thought and influence as a chief architect of the Platonic and Hermetic revival, the philosophical and revelatory center of the new learning that was revamping religious vision and humanistic enquiry Italian Renaissance.

Excerpt from Paul Oskar Kristeller Preface to volume 1 of the Letters of Ficino:   

 “The Letters occupy in fact a very important place in Ficino’s work. As historical documents, they give us a vivid picture of his personal relations with his friends and pupils, and of his own literary and scholarly activities. As pieces of literature, edited and collected by himself, the letters take their place among other correspondences of the time and are a monument of humanistic scholarship and literature. Finally, the letters are conscious vehicles of moral and philosophical teaching and often reach the dimensions of a short treatise. 

Ficino began to collect his letters in the 1470’s, gradually arranged them in twelve books, had them circulated in numerous manuscript copies, and finally had them printed in 1495. The first book contains letters written between 1457 and 1476, and its manuscript tradition is especially rich and complicated. These letters derive great interest from the time of their composition, for they were written at the same time as some of the commentaries on Plato and as the Platonic Theology, Ficino’s chief philosophical work. The correspondents include many persons of great significance: Cosimo and Lorenzo de’ Medici, and members of other prominent Florentine families, allied or hostile to the Medici at different times: Albizzi and Pazzi, Soderini and Rucellai, Salviati and Bandini, Del Nero, Benci and Canigiani, Niccolini, Martelli and Minerbetti. There are two cardinals, Francesco Piccolomini, the later Pius III, a famous patron and bibliophile, and Bessarion, the great defender of Platonism. There is Bernardo Bembo, Venetian patrician and ambassador, Giovanni Antonio Campano, bishop and humanist. Francesco Marescalchi in Ferrara, and Giovanni Aurelio Augurelli from Rimini. There are the friends of Ficino’s youth, Michele Mercati and Antonio Morali called Serafico, and his favourite friend, Giovanni Cavalcanti. There are philosophers and physicians, and there are numerous scholars, of different generations, who occupy a more or less prominent place in the annals of literature: Matteo Palmieri and Donato Acciaiuoli, Benedetto Accolti, Bartolomeo Scala and Niccolò Michelozzi, all connected with the chancery, Cristoforo Landino, Bartolomeo della Fonte and Angelo Poliziano, Francesco da Castiglione, perhaps Ficino’s teacher of Greek, and Antonio degli Agli, bishop of Fiesole and Volterra, Jacopo Bracciolini the son of Poggio, and Carlo Marsuppini, the son of the humanist chancellor of the same name, Benedetto Colucci and Lorenzo Lippi, Domenico Galletti and Francesco Tedaldi, Antonio Calderini and Andrea Cambini, Cherubino Quarquagli and Baccio Ugolini, known for their vernacular verse, and a number of Latin poets: Peregrino Agli, Alessandro Braccesi, Amerigo Corsini, Naldo Naldi and Antonio Pelotti. 

ISTC,; if00155000; GW; 9874; Goff; F-155; IGI,; 3864; BM 15th cent.,; II, 443; BSB-Ink,; F-120 Walsh 

  • Locations :
  • Boston Public Library
  • Harvard Library, Countway Library of Medicine (2)
  • Bryn Mawr 
  • Claremont Colleges
  • College of Physicians of Philadelphia
  • Cornell Univ. 
  • Free Library of Philadelphia
  • Library of Congress, 
  • Columbia University, 
  • The Morgan Library 
  • Pennsylvania State Univ.
  • Sacramento Public 
  • Smithsonian Institution, 
  • Stanford Univ. 
  • Newberry Library
  • Univ. of California, 
  • Univ. of Chicago 
  • Univ. of Florida 
  • Univ. of Kansas, 
  • Univ. of Michigan, 
  • Univ. of North Carolina Library
  • Yale University.
  • University of Toronto

1Marsilio Ficino as a Man of Letters and the Glosses Attributed to Him in the Caetani Codex of Dante, Paul Oskar Kristeller. Renaissance Quarterly Vol. 36, No. 1 (Spring, 1983), pp. 1-47 

Marsilio Ficino  directed the Platonic Academy in Florence, and it was the work of this Academy that gave the Renaissance in the 15th century its impulse and direction.
During his childhood Ficino was selected by Cosimo de’ Medici for an education in the humanities. Later Cosimo directed him to learn Greek and then to translate all the works of Plato into Latin. This enormous task he completed in about five years. He then wrote two important books, “The Platonic Theology” and “The Christian Religion”, showing how the Christian religion and Platonic philosophy were proclaiming the same message. The extraordinary influence the Platonic Academy came to exercise over the age arose from the fact that its leading spirits were already seeking fresh inspiration from the ideals of the civilizations of Greece and Rome and especially from the literary and philosophical sources of those ideals. Florence was the cultural and artistic centre of Europe at the time and leading men in so many fields were drawn to the Academy: Lorenzo de’Medici (Florence’s ruler), Alberti (the architect) and Poliziano (the poet).  Moreover Ficino bound together an enormous circle of correspondents throughout Europe, from the Pope in Rome to John Colet in London, from Reuchlin in Germany to de Ganay in France.

ISTC,; if00155000; GW; 9874; Goff; F-155; IGI,; 3864; BM 15th cent.,; II, 443; BSB-Ink,; F-120 .

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566J  Robertus Holcot.

[Super sapientiam Salomonis] Opus preclarissimum eximij d[omi]ni magistri roperti holkot sacre theologie moralissimi at[que] doctissimi p[ro]fessoris ordinis fratru[m] p[rae]dicator[um] sup[er] sapie[n]tia[m] salomonis  qua[m] philo disertissimus collegit .. Jncipit feliciter.

Speier: Per me Petrum Drach ciuem Spiren[sem] impressu[m], 26 Feb. 1483.    Price $18,000 { Anno incarnat[i]o[n]is dominice Millesimo quadringentesimooctogesimotercio.}

Folio. 30 x 21 1/2 cmhh.  Signatutres: [*10 **8] A10 B–Z a–c8 d6 e–q8 r s6 t8.   {Lacking  Blank *Blank and *9 and two text leaves Q 4+5(leaves 1, 19 and 350 blanks) This copy is bound in original red sheep over wooden boards with eight bosses and remains of clasps and catches. It is quite am impressive original binding. There is a woodcut printer’s device of Peter Drach (22 x 32 mm) on leaf t7v: “an early variation of Schöffer’s double shield suspended on a branch. Obviously, the dragon on the left shield is a play on the printer’s name. The meaning of the tree standing on a triple mound, with two stars, is unknown.”–M. Harman, Printer’s and publisher’s devices in incunabula in the University of Illinois Library, no. 40.

This is a work on the Proverbs of Solomon which claims to be by Robert Holcot or Thomas Waleys is most likely spurious.  The attribute English Dominican Robert Holkot (or Holcot, c.1290-1349) philosopher and biblical exegete, professor of theology at Oxford and a follower of William of Ockham s scholasticism. There are many works certainly authored by Holcot which have similar enough subject and treatment of those subject to make the inclusion of this work into Holcot’ds authentic works understandable. Holcot stands out among his contemporaries who were among the first generation to have developed their philosophical/theological positions after the influence of William Ockham. Because of this Holcot is often understood and considered in relation to a few categories of thinkers including -Agnosticism, Skepticism (in the Ockhamian sense) and Convenantism.

Where might be the source of wisdom? A heretical question almost.

The Supra sapientiam Salomonis consists of over 100 lectiones which situationalizes the concept of Wisdom itself as a specific theological loci imposing Scholastic method informed by Ocham’s scepticism. What is interesting is that this treatment of Solomon’s proverbs throw a different light on Holcot’s understanding of the relation of and reason than the traditional charge of scepticism . These included the Meaning of wisdom, its acquisition (source) as well as why princes and magistrates should study to achieve it through piety and philosophy. It is this peculiar emphasis which sets Holcot’s work apart from his contemporaries.

This commentary on the Book of Wisdom (Lectiones super librum Sapientiae), has been identified as a prime literary source for Chaucer’s Nun’s Priest’s Tale.

Holkot made original use of his biblical, patristic and classical sources including Seneca and Lucan. He used anecdotes and fables on Greek gods and mythological figures drawn, for instance, from Ovid s Metamorphoses .

Robert Holcot, John T. Slotemaker and Jeffrey C. Witt. 2016
Print ISBN-13: 9780199391240

The work is cited as authentic in: Bede Jarrett, O.P., Social Theories of the Middle Ages, 1200-1500 (London: Frank Cass and Company Ltd., 1926; reprint, N.V. Grafische Industrie Haarlem, 1968). NB: see page 77 of the 1968 edition. See Quétif-Échard, pp. 630-31. There is no mention of this work in T. Kaeppeli.

Goff H289; BM 15th cent.,; II, 493 (IB. 8537); ISTC (CD-ROM, 1997 ed.),; ih00289000; Walsh, J.E. 15th cent. printed books,; 848;  Hain-Copinger,; 8757*; Proctor,; 2352;

See also :

Facientibus quod in se est Deus non denegat Gratiam: Robert Holcot, O.P. and the Beginnings of Luther’s Theology : Heiko A. Oberman ;The Harvard Theological Review. Vol. 55, No. 4 (Oct., 1962), pp. 317-342 

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7 & 8) Two copies 1475 & 1500 of OROSIUS’ SEVEN BOOKS OF HISTORY AGAINST THE PAGANS  THE FIRST WORLD HISTORY BY A CHRISTIAN COMPLETED C. 418 CE.

.

526J. Paulus Orosius (385-420).

Pauli Orosii Viri Doctissimi Historiarum initium ad Aurelium Augustinum; Historiarum initium ad Aurelium Augustinum; Historiarum adversus paganos libri VII.

Venedig: Bernardinus de Vitalibus, 12.oct.1500          price $8,000

Folio 30 x 20 cm. Signatures: a-m⁶ n⁸ (a1 blank and present).  Capital spaces with guide letters with capitals supplied in Red and Blue . Printer’s device and register at colophon. This is a very largre copy bound in later vellum from an antiphonal leaf. 

“Orosius’s universal history, written to counter the prevailing belief among non-Christians that disasters which had befallen civilization were the result of the pagan gods, angry with worshippers turning to Christianity.   Orosius argued that the 410 CE sack of Rome by Alaric I, King of the Goths (r. 394-410 CE) had nothing to do with the Roman adoption of Christianity, a claim popularly supported among the pagans of the day. 

This history is a continuation of the thrust of Augustine’s “City of God. Augustine urged Orosius to write this history to refute Symmachus who in an address to Emperor Valentinianus in 384 C.E. alleged that the Roman Empire was crumbling due to Christianity. “Most scholars agree that Orosius’ history shows signs of being written in haste and perhaps Augustine wanted it finished quickly so that he could use it as a resource in completing City of God. Other theories suggest that Orosius assisted in writing City of God and his history is written quickly because he was working on two pieces at once. All of this is speculation, however, because all that is really known is that Orosius left Hippo and returned with St. Stephen’s relics to Portugal. He then wrote his history and, shortly afterwards, disappeared. “

In Book I, Orosius gives the history of the world from creation to the Great Flood and the early founding of Rome. The second book discusses Roman history up until its sack in 390 BCE by the Gauls and Rome’s interactions with other nations afterwards. In the third and fourth books, Orosius deals with Alexander the Great, the rise and fall of nations, and Rome’s role in the Punic Wars and the destruction of Carthage. The fifth, sixth, and seventh books focus on Rome from the end of the Third Punic War (146 BCE) to Orosius’ time c. 418 CE.”

 Mark, J. J. (2019, April 03). Orosius. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/Orosius/

ISTC io00101000., Goff O-101; Hain, L. Repertorium bibliographicum,; 12104*; Copinger, W.A. Supplement to Hain’s Repertorium bibliographicum,; 12104; Gesamtkatalog der Wiegendrucke,; M28413; BMC vol. V, p. 549 (IB. 24354)

277J Orosius, Paulus Orosius (385-420).

Historiae adversus paganos, edited by Aeneas Vulpes. Scias velim humanissime lector: Aeneam Vulpem Vicentinum priorem sanctae crucis adiutore Laurentio Brixiensi Historias Pauli Orosii quae continentur hoc codice:

[Vicenza]: Hermannus Liechtenstein, [c.1475].  $22,000

Folio. 285 x 200 mm No signatures: [1-7]8 [8]6 [9-12]8 [13]6. 100 leaves unnumbered. 

Image 2 of 6 for Historiae adversus paganos, edited by Aeneas Vulpes. Scias velim humanissime lector: Aeneam Vulpem Vicentinum priorem sanctae crucis adiutore Laurentio Brixiensi Historias Pauli Orosii quae continentur hoc codice:

In this copy there is a large opening initial in green, red, blue, and yellow, with floral extensions in the margin, other initials in red, some in blue, initial spaces, most with guide letters, rubricated. It is bound in full modern vellum of appropriate style. 

Image 3 of 6 for Historiae adversus paganos, edited by Aeneas Vulpes. Scias velim humanissime lector: Aeneam Vulpem Vicentinum priorem sanctae crucis adiutore Laurentio Brixiensi Historias Pauli Orosii quae continentur hoc codice:

“As this book is the only one of Liechtenstein’s editions which has no printed signatures it is presumably his earliest work”--British Museum.

Image 4 of 6 for Historiae adversus paganos, edited by Aeneas Vulpes. Scias velim humanissime lector: Aeneam Vulpem Vicentinum priorem sanctae crucis adiutore Laurentio Brixiensi Historias Pauli Orosii quae continentur hoc codice:

This is the Second edition of Orosius’s universal history, written to counter the prevailing belief among non-Christians that disasters which had befallen civilization were the result of the pagan gods, angry with worshippers turning to Christianity. This history is a continuation of the thrust of Augustine’s “City of God. Augustine urged Orosius to write this history to refute Symmachus who in an address to Emperor Valentinianus in 384 C.E. alledged that the Roman Empire was crumbling due to Christianity. Orosius was a Gallaecian Chalcedonian priest, historian and theologian, a student of Augustine of Hippo as well as Saint Jerome. This history begins with the creation and continues to his own day, was an immensely popular and standard work of reference on antiquity throughout the Middle Ages and beyond. Its importance lay in the fact that Orosius was the first Christian author to write not a church history, but rather a history of the secular world interpreted from a Christian perspective. The work treats world history as a concrete proof of the apocalyptic visions of the Bible. This became a kind of textbook of universal history for the Middle Ages; and therefore many manuscripts exist all over Europe. Orosius’s work is crucial for an understanding of early Christian approaches to history, the development of universal history, and the intellectual life of the Middle Ages, for which it was both an important reference work and also a defining model for the writing of history. 

ISTC io00097000; Goff O-97; BMC VII 1035; H *12099; GW M28420; Bod-inc O-027; BSB-Ink O-82; Sajó-Soltész 2477; Item #277J

Price: $22,000.00 

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Savonarola’s last work !

Savonarola, Girolamo, 1452-1498Jncipit Exposicio v[e]l Meditacio f[rat]ris Hieronimi sauonarole de Ferraria ordi[ni]s p[rae]dicatorum in psalmu[m] Jn te d[omi]ne speraui. qua[m] i[n] vltimis dieb[us] du[m] vite sue fine[m] prestolaretur edidit.

(Exposicio in psalmum  XXXI In te domine speravi). N.pl., n.d. (prob. the ed. Magdenburg, Moritz Brandis), after 1500,     Price: SOLD

Quarto 20 x 15 cm. a4,b4.   (8) lvs., rubricated in red, modern boards.[*] – First leaf w. incipit with outer remargined ; a few tiny wormholes throughout (mostly in blank margins). Hieronymus Savonarola (1452-1498)  In te Domine speravi. The Dominican preacher wrote this text while in prison in Florence in 1498, charged with heresy, and having been found guilty was burned at the stake in that year. He  was a Catholic and a critic of the luxurious lives of the rulers, the Medici family, of the Florentian people and the corruption in the Catholic Church. His sermons resulted in the downfall of the ruling Medici family. Pope Alexander VI excommunicated him.IMG_5919.jpeg  “  Savonarola , after his first ” examination ” nearly amonth of quiet in the little prison , which, after all, was notless spacious or comfortable than his cell. This resting timethe victim employed in a manner befitting his characterand life. He wrote two meditations , one on the Miserere(5 1st Psalm) and the other on the 31 st Psalm, in which hepoured out his whole heart in communion with God. Withthe right hand which had been spared to him in diabolicalmercy that he might be able to sign the false papers whichwere intended to cover him with ignominy, he still had itin his power to leave a record of that intercourse with hisheavenly Master in which his stricken soul found strengthand comfort. Between the miserable lies of the notary Ceccone,over which those Florentine nobles in the palace werewrangling ; and the stillness of the little prison hung highin air over their heads, where a great soul in noble trustyet sadness approached its Maker, what a difference!”

                                                  [E. H. PEROWNE, D.D. 1900 ]

Savonarola writes at the last bit written, a quite heartfelt passage”“BURN away Thy face from my sins, and blot outall tnine iniquities. Wherefore, Lord, regardestThou my sins ? Why numberest Thou them ?Why considerest Thou them so diligently ? KnowestThou not that man is as a flower of the field ? Where-fore lookest Thou not rather on the face of Thy Christ ?Alas, wretch that I am, why see I Thee angry withme ? I confess I have sinned, but do Thou in Thygoodness have mercy upon me : turn away Thy facefrom my sins. Thy face is Thy knowledge ; turnaway therefore Thy knowledge from my sins. I meannot that knowledge which consists in simple appre-hension, wherewith Thou seest all things at all times,but the knowledge which consists in approval and  disapproval, whereby Thou dost approve the actions of  the just, and by disapproving dost condemn the sins of the wicked. Take not such knowledge of my sins as to impute them to me ; but turn away Thy face from my sins, that through Thy mercy they may be blotted out. Regard, Lord, the soul which Thou hastcreated, regard Thy likeness which Thou hast formed. For Thou didst create it in Thine image, and I poorwretch have overlaid it with the likeness of the devil.” (Translated by Perowne.)

Under torture Savonarola confessed to having invented his prophecies and visions, then recanted, then confessed again.  In his prison cell in the tower of the government palace he composed meditations on Psalms 51 and 31.  On the morning of 23 May 1498, Savonarola and two other friars were led out into the main square where, before a tribunal of high clerics and government officials, they were condemned as heretics and schismatics, and sentenced to die forthwith. Stripped of their Dominican garments in ritual degradation, they mounted the scaffold in their thin white shirts. Each on a separate gallows, they were hanged, while fires were ignited below them to consume their bodies. To prevent devotees from searching for relics, their ashes were carted away and scattered in the Arno .

Scapecchi, P. Cat. Savonarola,; 87 (Catalogo delle edizioni di Girolamo Savonarola (secc. XV-XVI) possedute dalla Biblioteca nazionale centrale di Firenze)  Girolamo Savonarola, Prison Meditations on Psalms 51 and 31 Tr., Ed. John Patrick Donnelly S.J. (Milwaukee, Marquette University Press, 1994).

Goff (suppl.); S-206a; BMC 15th cent.; II 601;  GW M40482 ; Hain-Copinger; 14412; Reichling; 1384; Audin de Rians, E. Bib.,; 138;      ISTC No.is00206500. https://data.cerl.org/istc/is00206500 United Kingdom   British Library (IA.10973)      United States of America.    Yale add ???   US,TX  SMU   

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  Henry Suso: Servent to Eternal Wisdom A rare and wonderful copy!

“In the second half of the fourteenth and in the fifteenth century there was no more widely read meditation book in the German language.” (CE https://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07238c.htm)

573J  Henricus Suso. (1295-1366)

 Horologium aeternae sapientiae.

573J  Henricus Suso. (1295-1366)

 Horologium aeternae sapientiae.

Cologne: Johann Landen, December 1500/1501. $22,000

Octavo, 13.4 x 10cm. Signatures A-Q8. In this copy there are lombard initials in red and blue, one with dog-head decoration, red capital strokes, paragraph marks, and underlining. 

A Woodcut appears three times, on title, title verso, and verso of final leaf (margin of f. 2 slightly extended, occasional damp stains at gutter and edges, a few leaves in gathering O stained and one with short closed tear). Bound in modern vellum with manuscript antiphonal leaf reused as pastedowns. 

No copies of this edition are recorded at auction by ABPC or RBH.

 VD16 S 6103; ISTC is00876500; Goldschmidt p. 135. See Ford BPH 177 (first edition) and 178 (fourth edition). [APA citation. McMahon, A. (1910). Blessed Henry Suso. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Retrieved April 27, 2022 from New Advent: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07238c.htm%5D

https://data.cerl.org/istc/is00876500

Holdings: GermanyWuppertal StB & Russia Moscow, [Russian State Library] Rossijskaja Gosudarstvennaja Biblioteka (Berlin copy). Number of holding institutions 2. 

The German Mystics of the fourteenth century, Meister Eckhart, Johannes Tauler and Heinrich Suso, seemed to be constantly Willing the ability of Unwillingness. Perhaps Eckhart is the most profoundly speculatively blunt so much so that he was accused of heresy and brought up before the local Franciscan-led Inquisition, and tried as a heretic but died before a verdict. Tauler intern provides neo-platonic richness and logic to this position. Suso’s is to explore the territory through emotion. Suso’s first books , Büchlein der Wahrheit (Little Book of Truth) and Das Büchlein der ewigen Weisheit (The Little Book of Eternal Wisdom) were written in German and structured as instructions and explanations for Beginners as well as a defense and adaptation of Eckharts spiritual views. 

Eckhart tells us : “Be willing to be a beginner every single morning”

Likewise Suso writes of himself in his Autobiography “The inward impulse, which he had received 8from God, urged him to turn away entirely from every thing which might be a hindrance to him. The tempter met this with the suggestion:—Bethink thee better. ” (First printed Cologne A.D. 1535.) Suso proceeds to expose the interior to the elements and deals with in good spirit.  The Clock of Eternal Wisdom, exhibits not only faith but trust in the unknown, Like Walter Hilton before him, and Thomas à Kempis after him, Suso dwells poetically and thoughtfully on the frustrations and disappointments as well as spiritualising ways of dealing with them by servitude to that which is beyond perception.

Suso Belongs in the Higherarchy of Great books 

of internal spiritual quest along with 

Boethius, Dante and à Kempis