Author INDEX

1) 430J Francis Bacon 

2) 405 J Adrien Baillet 

3)  312J Jacobi Balde

 4)  431J  Petri Godofredi

5) 419J Giles Jacob

6) 103G Katherine Philips

7) Sold 

8) 331j.#781  Theolophilus Polwheile

9) 736G Antoine Varillas 

•)§(•

1) 430J Francis Bacon 

 Histoire du règne de HENRY VII ROY D’ANGLETERRE. Traduite du Latin de Messire François Bacon.

A Bruges, chez André Wydts, Marchand Libraire & Imprimeur de la Ville 1724.  $200

Occtavo, π2,*,**,A-X8. Frontispice by Heylbroeck This Copy is bound in French 18th century sheep with a gilt spine.

“Of the historical works, besides a few fragments of the projected history of Britain there remains the History of Henry VII, a valuable work, giving a clear and animated narrative of the reign, and characterizing Henry with great skill. The style is in harmony with the matter, vigorous and flowing, but naturally with less of the quaintness and richness suitable to more thoughtful and original writings.” (Encyclopedia Britannica, eleventh edition, entry on Bacon.)

405J   Adrien Baillet  (But Anonymous) 1649-1706Auteurs deguisez : Sous des noms etrangers ; empruntez, supposez, feints à plaisir, chiffrez, renversez, retournez, ou changez d’une langue en une autre. 
Paris, Chez Antoine Dezallier, 1690.     $ 950 
IMG_294812mo. First edition. xxv,(2),615,(1)pp.First edition of the earliest French work on pseudonyms..Baillet was, from 1680 to his death, librarian to M. de Lamoignon, advocat-general to the parlement of Paris, of whose library he produced a manuscript catalogue raisonné in 35 folio volumes.Just to be sure that Baillet is really the author…I go to  Barbier to discover the author of this pioneering work, here we read that– Cet ouvrage [était] le premier publié en France sur ce genre de recherches bibliographiques.The subject is approached from various angles, the psychology of pseudonymity, the various types of cognomes etc. This was a preliminary treatise, which should have been followed by a Recueil des Auteurs Déguisés but unfortunately the author died in 1706 leaving his work unfinished, and it was not for another 100 years, with the publication of Barbier’s Dictionnaire des Ouvrages Anonymes in 1806, that the project was finally completed. In his preface Barbier pays eloquent tribute to the erudition of his predecessor. “In 1690 Adrien Baillet (1649 – 1706) published his Auteurs deguisez…A list of nearly 1,700 identifications of pseudonyms accompanied this extensive and very interesting discussion. Unconsciously, Baillet adopted in this list a new procedure that has had many imitators… Aprosio’s Visiera alzata and Baillet’s Auteurs deguisez are the first great contributions to the study of cryptonyms by librarians.” (Taylor & Mosher, The Bibliographical History of Anonyma and Pseudonyma, pp. 115-116).Baillet’s bibliographical activities left him no time to change his clothes or to eat more than one meal a day.This book a very sizable well-indexed tome of some 615 pages. To be sure it is not to be compared with Querard or Bar- bier, since it is a treatise rather than a catalogue. The work, written ostensibly to amuse as well as to instruct, is divided in orderly fashion into four compartments. The first contains sev- eral chapters which deal with general reflexions on change of name and the customs usually observed in such a procedure. The second concerns the motives which authors have had to change their names and disguise themselves. The third outlines and treats of the ways in which they have brought about the modification.Finally, part four discusses the inconveniences caused by writers who have taken this step.IMG_3129 
 
CG, VI, 562; BarbierWade, Ira. “Voltaire and Baillet’s Manual of Pseudonyms.” Modern Language Notes, vol. 50, no. 4, 1935, pp. 209–215. JSTORhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/2912134. Accessed 20 May 2020.Baillet’s treatise is a veritable handbook for one wishing to adopt a pseudonym. Not only are the methods devised to conceal one’s name discussed at length, but also the motives instigating the act are fully analyzed. 
Baillet lists twenty-one different procedures to be followed in effecting this particular disguise: one may change his name into that of some place of birth, dwelling, fief, seigneury, or ” benefice.” An author may take the name of another. Or he may fashion a patronymic after the manner of the Greeks from one of his ances- tors. He may adopt a name of a profession, or rank, or even that of a Society, Academy, or monastery. He may assume a ” nom de guerre.” He may disguise himself with a sobriquet. Sometimes he finds his pseudonym in the subject-matter, in one of the characters or even in the title of his work. He may ” affecter l’anti- phrase ” or ” prendre des synonimes,” or adopt a cognomen whose meaning is close to that of the one suppressed. He may translate his name from one language to another, change his Christian name, increase or decrease the number of his surnames. He may devise an anagram of his original name, design a new one from the initials of the original, lengthen or shorten his own.The book of Baillet, thorough and interesting as it is, must never have been a seventeenth-century best seller. It was however re- printed in 1722 in volume VI of the Jugements des savants, con-siderably annotated by De la Monnoye. In the course of time, one copy of the 1690 edition was taken into the Bastille under circumstances which have been discussed fully by Funck-Brentano.1 Inspiring Voltaire who read it there to change his name!IMG_3132
3)   312J Jacobi Balde 1605-1668

 

Iacobi Balde è Societate Jesu Urania Victrix : [sive animae christianae certamina adversus illecebras et insultus quinque sensuum, ministrorum corporis sui elegiaco carmine descripta].

Monachii [Munich] : Typis Joannis Wilhelm Schell, sumptibus Joannis Wagneri, civis ac bibliopolae Monacensis, 1663.                                      $1,200

urania

321JUntitled

Octavo)( [-)(8] A-X [L5 signed ‘K5’].      [[16], 329, [5] p., [6] leaves of plates 3 (of 5) copper plates and 3 engravings. plates depicting the senses by Melchior Küsel. Engraved arms of Alexander VII, to whom the work is dedicated, on p. [5] of preliminaries and p. 329. Engraving on p. 318, signed by P. Kilian . This copy is bound in contemporary read morocco  with gilt boards and Spine. a very nice copy .

Urania Victrix is historical-metaphysical poem of the power (and weakness) of sensory world

321JUntitled 2

This is not only a sophisticated and conflict-laden edification, but also a panorama of Baroque culture of knowledge, in which the five senses of man recommend their own modern world experience. It is a “comprehensive allegorical poem about the purely worldly-oriented human arts and sciences …” (Dünnhaupt).

Urania (the Goddess/muse of astronomy) w is the representation of the soul whois the addressee of love letters from each of the five senses and she always replies answers in the negative.  Here begins Balde’s contest between the Christian soul and the temptation of the five senses. This impressed Pope Alexander VII. so much that he sent the author a golden medal.  Urania is further addressed by a painter, a musician and a chef. The letters begin with the sense of sight.   Sight tells Urania [I am] an especially precious sense, without which you could not read… we senses send you this greeting…We senses are quintuplets, and you too have always appeared to value most of all. For why else would you lavish so much stolen flattery and tenderness on just one of us? On me, to whom you cry “My Light”. Urania is of course victorious ‘Urania Victrxi’never letting the five senses seduce or receive her soul or challenge her faith!

324JUntitled 7

Faber du Faur ; no. 996 Yale University Library collection of German baroque literature ; no.; McGeary & Nash. Emblem books at the University of Illinois,; B1; Landwehr, J. German emblem books,; 121  Sommervogel-deBacker Vol I no.24 (p823)

4). 431J  Petri Godofredi

Petri Godofredi Carcasonensis, JC. De Amoribus Libri Tres

Lugduni Batavorum : ex officina Joannis Maire,1648.      $1,900

Duodecimo. (*)6 A-Q12 R-S6 (G5 signed. ‘G6’) Bound in 19th century polished calf. (this copy has many signatures with deckle edges.)

  1. 430J Francis Bacon.  1561-1626      .                                                                                                                                                             Histoire du règne de HENRY VII ROY D’ANGLETERRE. Traduite du Latin de Messire François Bacon.                                          

    A Bruges, chez André Wydts, Marchand Libraire & Imprimeur de la Ville 1724.                                              $200

    Octavo π2 *, ** A-X8 Frontispice by Heylbroeck Bound in full contemporary sheep with gilt spine.                        

    ¶“Of the historical works, besides a few fragments of the projected history of Britain there remains the History of Henry VII, a valuable work, giving a clear and animated narrative of the reign, and characterizing Henry with great skill. The style is in harmony with the matter, vigorous and flowing, but naturally with less of the quaintness and richness suitable to more thoughtful and original writings.” (Encyclopedia Britannica, eleventh edition, entry on Bacon.)

2) 405J   Adrien Baillet  (But Anonymous) 1649-1706

Auteurs deguisez : Sous des noms etrangers ; empruntez, supposez, feints à plaisir, chiffrez, renversez, retournez, ou changez d’une langue en une autre.

  1. Paris, Chez Antoine Dezallier, 1690.     $ 750

IMG_294812mo. First edition. xxv,(2),615,(1)pp.

First edition of the earliest French work on pseudonyms..

Baillet was, from 1680 to his death, librarian to M. de Lamoignon, advocat-general to the parlement of Paris, of whose library he produced a manuscript catalogue raisonné in 35 folio volumes.

Just to be sure that Baillet is really the author…I go to  Barbier to discover the author of this pioneering work, here we read that

– Cet ouvrage [était] le premier publié en France sur ce genre de recherches bibliographiques.

The subject is approached from various angles, the psychology of pseudonymity, the various types of cognomes etc. This was a preliminary treatise, which should have been followed by a Recueil des Auteurs Déguisés but unfortunately the author died in 1706 leaving his work unfinished, and it was not for another 100 years, with the publication of Barbier’s Dictionnaire des Ouvrages Anonymes in 1806, that the project was finally completed. In his preface Barbier pays eloquent tribute to the erudition of his predecessor. “In 1690 Adrien Baillet (1649 – 1706) published his Auteurs deguisez…

A list of nearly 1,700 identifications of pseudonyms accompanied this extensive and very interesting discussion. Unconsciously, Baillet adopted in this list a new procedure that has had many imitators… Aprosio’s Visiera alzata and Baillet’s Auteurs deguisez are the first great contributions to the study of cryptonyms by librarians.” (Taylor & Mosher, The Bibliographical History of Anonyma and Pseudonyma, pp. 115-116).

Baillet’s bibliographical activities left him no time to change his clothes or to eat more than one meal a day.

This book a very sizable well-indexed tome of some 615 pages. To be sure it is not to be compared with Querard or Bar- bier, since it is a treatise rather than a catalogue. The work, written ostensibly to amuse as well as to instruct, is divided in orderly fashion into four compartments. The first contains sev- eral chapters which deal with general reflexions on change of name and the customs usually observed in such a procedure. The second concerns the motives which authors have had to change their names and disguise themselves. The third outlines and treats of the ways in which they have brought about the modification.

Finally, part four discusses the inconveniences caused by writers who have taken this step.

IMG_3129

CG, VI, 562; Barbier

Wade, Ira. “Voltaire and Baillet’s Manual of Pseudonyms.” Modern Language Notes, vol. 50, no. 4, 1935, pp. 209–215. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/2912134. Accessed 20 May 2020.

Baillet’s treatise is a veritable handbook for one wishing to adopt a pseudonym. Not only are the methods devised to conceal one’s name discussed at length, but also the motives instigating the act are fully analyzed.

 

Baillet lists twenty-one different procedures to be followed in effecting this particular disguise: one may change his name into that of some place of birth, dwelling, fief, seigneury, or ” benefice.” An author may take the name of another. Or he may fashion a patronymic after the manner of the Greeks from one of his ances- tors. He may adopt a name of a profession, or rank, or even that of a Society, Academy, or monastery. He may assume a ” nom de guerre.” He may disguise himself with a sobriquet. Sometimes he finds his pseudonym in the subject-matter, in one of the characters or even in the title of his work. He may ” affecter l’anti- phrase ” or ” prendre des synonimes,” or adopt a cognomen whose meaning is close to that of the one suppressed. He may translate his name from one language to another, change his Christian name, increase or decrease the number of his surnames. He may devise an anagram of his original name, design a new one from the initials of the original, lengthen or shorten his own.

The book of Baillet, thorough and interesting as it is, must never have been a seventeenth-century best seller. It was however re- printed in 1722 in volume VI of the Jugements des savants, con-siderably annotated by De la Monnoye. In the course of time, one copy of the 1690 edition was taken into the Bastille under circumstances which have been discussed fully by Funck-Brentano.1 Inspiring Voltaire who read it there to change his name!

IMG_3132

Godofredi,’s book is a testimony to the interest in the Literature of Love, He Mentions and quotes Thomas More, Enea Silvio, Leon Ebreo,  and poets from antiquity to his present, jurists theologians and philosophers In this book author deals in this book with lawful and illicit loves, marriage, prostitution, incest, unnatural loves, adultery, stupor, fornication, etc.

GBV; 218582188.; SUDOC; 099987279.

5) 419J.  Giles Jacob

“I doubt not but the Reader will do me the Justice to confess, that this Book is the most compleatest on the Subject …” and hopes that it “will be received by all Gentlemen who spend any Part of their Time in the Country, with the Candour natural in Country Gentlemen.”

 Jacob, Giles 1686-1744

The compleat sportsmanIn three parts. Part I. Containing the nature and various kinds of game, under their several Denominations, with the best Methods of taking the same, by Shooting, Hunting, Dogs, Nets, and otherwise ; and the Laws and Statutes made for Preservation of the Game, with Warrants to impower Game-Keepers, &c. Part II. Of the best Situations and Methods of erecting and Management of Parks, Warrens, &c. Of Hunting the Buck, Doe, &c. And a concise Abridgment of the Forest-Laws, and of all the Laws and Statutes relating to Deer: Methodically interspersed with Precedents of Warrants for Deer, &c. Part III. Of fish and fishing ; the most successful Methods of Angling ; the only proper Baits, Tackle and agreeable Seasons for taking all Sorts of Fish ; and the Rivers wherein they are to be found ; with the Statutes relating to Fishing, &c.

[London] : In the Savoy, printed by Eliz. Nutt, and R. Gosling, (assigns of Edward Sayer Esq;) for J. Tonson at Shakespear’s-Head in the Strand, and W. Taylor at the Ship in Pater-Noster-Row, 1718.                            $1,500

Small octavo 4 x 6 ½ . inches. AB-G12H6 . The title page has a repair in the blank are on the top margin.  The first two parts concern shooting and hunting and the third part is about fishing.   

Giles Jacob, lawyer and dramatist, was the brother of the poet Hildebrand Jacob. Most of his numerous publications were legal works; after provoking Pope by adverse comments on Three Hours after Marriage Jacob was pilloried as “mighty J—b Blunderbus of Law” in the 1728 Dunciad. The literary works of Giles Jacob did not fare as well as his legal ones, and he feuded with the poet Alexander Pope both publicly and in literary form. Pope named Jacob as one of the dunces in his 1728 Dunciad, referring to Jacob as “the blunderbuss of the law”. Jacob is remembered well for his legal writing, though not so much for his poetry and plays.  ¶In 1716, Elizabeth took over the printing business and continued to be listed as a printer on title pages until 1741. As her printing and newspaper distribution business expanded, Mrs. Nutt deputized her daughters, Catherine, Sarah, and Alice, to manage the various bookstores and newspaper outlets around London (Early women printers) Elizabeth Nutt and her husband John Nutt were printers and booksellers in London in the early 18th century. In 1705, John Nutt acquired an exclusive patent to print law books. When he died in 1716, Elizabeth took over the printing business and continued to be listed as a printer on title pages until 1741. She passed her patent for printing law books to her son in 1722.

Elizabeth Nutt stated in 1728:  “It has been her Business for about forty years to sell News Papers and Pamphlets at the Royal Exchange.”                     -Paula McDowell, The Women of Grub Street: Press Politics and Gender in the London Literary Marketplace.

English Short Title Catalog,; ESTCT137001;  Westwood & Satchell, p.123; 

Schwerdt, C.F.G.R. Hunting I, p.263], ; Helen Smith.  Women and the Book Trade

Copies – N.America  :  Harvard Law, McMaster University, New York Public & 3 copies @ Princeton. and Washington State U.

6) 11) 103g Philips, Katherine.1631-1664

Letters from Orinda to Poliarchus

 London: printed by W.B. for Bernard Lintott, 1705                       $2,500

Octavo,6.75 X 3.75 inches.  First edition A-R8  Bound in original calf totally un-restored a very nice original condition copy with only some browning, spotting and damp staining, It is a very good copy.

It is housed in a custom Box.

DSC_0057 3
DSC_0059 2
DSC_0057 4.jpg

7) 376J Mary Pix 1666-1720

The conquest of Spain: a tragedy. As it is Acted by Her Majesty’s Servants at the Queen’s Theatre In the Hay-Market 

London : printed for Richard Wellington, at the Dolphin and Crown in St. Paul’s Church-Yard, 1705.      SOLD

Quarto [A]-K4.   First Edition . (Anonymous. By Mary Pix. Adapted from “All’s lost by lust”, by William Rowley)

Version 2Inspired by Aphra Behn, Mary Pix was among the most popular playwrights on the 17th-century theatre circuit, but fell out of fashion. 

“It is so rare to find a play from that period that’s powered by a funny female protagonist. I was immensely surprised by the brilliance of the writing. It is witty and forthright. Pix was writing plays that not only had more women in the cast than men but women who were managing their destinies.”

Pix was born in 1666, the year of the Great Fire of London, and grew up in the culturally rich time of Charles II. With the prolific Aphra Behn (1640-1689) as her role model, Pix burst on to the London theatre and literary scene in 1696 with two plays – one a tragedy: Ibrahim, the Thirteenth Emperor of the Turks, the other a farce – The Spanish Wives. Pix also wrote a novel – The Inhuman Cardinal.

Her subsequent plays, mostly comedies, became a staple in the repertory of Thomas Betterton’s company Duke’s at Lincoln’s Inn Fields and later at the Queen’s Theatre. She wrote primarily for particular actors, such as Elizabeth Barry and Anne Bracegirdle, who were hugely popular and encouraged a whole generation of women writers.

In a patriarchal world dominated by self-important men, making a mark as a woman was an uphill struggle. “There was resistance to all achieving women in the 18th century, a lot of huffing and puffing by overbearing male chauvinists,” says Bush-Bailey.

“Luckily for Pix and the other women playwrights of that time, the leading actresses were powerful and influential. I think it was they who mentored people such as Pix and Congreve.”

Davies believes the women playwrights of the 1700s – Susanna Centlivre, Catherine Trotter Cockburn, Delarivier Manley and Hannah Cowley – “unquestionably” held their own against the men who would put them down. “What’s difficult is that they were attacked for daring to write plays at all,” she says.

One of the most blatant examples of male hostility came in the form of an anonymously written parody entitled The Female Wits in 1696, in which Mary Pix was caricatured as “Mrs Wellfed, a fat female author, a sociable, well-natur’d companion that will not suffer martyrdom rather than take off three bumpers [alcoholic drinks] in a hand”.

While Pix’s sociability and taste for good food and wine was common knowledge, she was known to be a universally popular member of the London literary and theatrical circuit.

“The Female Wits was probably written, with malice, by George Powell of the Drury Lane Company,” says Bush-Bailey. “It was a cheap, satirical jibe at the successful women playwrights of the time, making out they were all bitching behind each others’ backs. So far as one can tell, it was just spiteful and scurrilous.”

Mary Pix (1666 – 17 May 1709) was an English novelist and playwright. As an admirer of Aphra Behn and colleague of Susanna Centlivre, Pix has been called “a link between women writers of the Restoration and Augustan periods”.

The Dramatis personae from a 1699 edition of Pix’s The False Friend.

Mary Griffith Pix was born in 1666, the daughter of a rector, musician and Headmaster of the Royal Latin School, Buckingham, Buckinghamshire; her father, Roger Griffith, died when she was very young, but Mary and her mother continued to live in the schoolhouse after his death. She was courted by her father’s successor Thomas Dalby, but he left with the outbreak of smallpox in town, just one year after the mysterious fire that burned the schoolhouse. Rumour had it that Mary and Dalby had been making love rather energetically and overturned a candle which set fire to the bedroom.

In 1684, at the age of 18, Mary Griffith married George Pix (a merchant tailor from Hawkhurst, Kent). The couple moved to his country estate in Kent. Her first son, George (b. 1689), died very young in 1690.[3] The next year the couple moved to London and she gave birth to another son, William (b. 1691).

In 1696, when Pix was thirty years old, she first emerged as a professional writer, publishing The Inhumane Cardinal; or, Innocence Betrayed, her first and only novel, as well as two plays, Ibrahim, the Thirteenth Emperour of the Turks and The Spanish Wives.

Though from quite different backgrounds, Pix quickly became associated with two other playwrights who emerged in the same year: Delariviere Manley and Catherine Trotter. The three female playwrights attained enough public success that they were criticised in the form of an anonymous satirical play The Female Wits (1696). Mary Pix appears as “Mrs. Wellfed one that represents a fat, female author. A good rather sociable, well-matured companion that would not suffer martyrdom rather than take off three bumpers in a hand”.[4] She is depicted as an ignorant woman, though amiable and unpretentious. Pix is summarised as “foolish and openhearted”.

Her first play was put on stage in 1696 at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, near her house in London but when that same theatrical company performed The Female Wits, she moved to Lincoln’s Inn Fields. They said of her that “she has boldly given us an essay of her talent … and not without success, though with little profit to herself”. (Morgan, 1991: xii).

In the season of 1697–1698, Pix became involved in a plagiarism scandal with George Powell. Powell was a rival playwright and the manager of the Drury Lane theatrical company. Pix sent her play, The Deceiver Deceived to Powell’s company, as a possible drama for them to perform. Powell rejected the play but kept the manuscript and then proceeded to write and perform a play called The Imposture Defeated, which had a plot and main character taken directly from The Deceiver Deceived. In the following public backlash, Pix accused Powell of stealing her work and Powell claimed that instead he and Pix had both drawn their plays from the same source material, an unnamed novel. In 1698, an anonymous writer, now believed to be Powell, published a letter called “To the Ingenious Mr. _____.” which attacked Pix and her fellow female playwright Trotter. The letter attempted to malign Pix on various issues, such as her spelling and presumption in publishing her writing. Though Pix’s public reputation was not damaged and she continued writing after the plagiarism scandal, she stopped putting her name on her work and after 1699 she only included her name on one play, in spite of the fact that she is believed to have written at least seven more. Scholars still discuss the attribution of plays to Pix, notably whether or not she wrote Zelmane; or, The Corinthian Queen (1705).

In May 1707 Pix published A Poem, Humbly Inscrib’d to the Lords Commissioners for the Union of the Two Kingdoms. This would be her final appearance in print. She died two years later.

Few of the female playwrights of Mary Pix’s time came from a theatrical background and none came from the aristocracy: within a century, most successful actresses and female authors came from a familiar tradition of literature and theatre but Mary Pix and her contemporaries were from outside this world and had little in common with one another apart from a love for literature and a middle-class background.

At the time of Mary Pix, “The ideal of the one-breadwinner family had not yet become dominant”, whereas in 18th-century families it was normal for the woman to stay at home taking care of the children, house and servants, in Restoration England husband and wife worked together in familiar enterprises that sustained them both and female playwrights earned the same wage as their male counterparts.

Morgan also points out that “till the close of the period, authorship was not generally advertised on playbills, nor always proclaimed when plays were printed”, which made it easier for female authors to hide their identity so as to be more easily accepted among the most conservative audiences.

As Morgan states, “plays were valued according to how they performed and not by who wrote them. When authorship ―female or otherwise― remained a matter of passing interest, female playwrights were in an open and equal market with their male colleagues”.

Pix’s plays were very successful among contemporary audiences. Each play ran for at least four to five nights and some were even brought back for additional shows years later.[10] Her tragedies were quite popular, because she managed to mix extreme action with melting love scenes. Many critics believed that Pix’s best pieces were her comedies. Pix’s comedic work was lively and full of double plots, intrigue, confusion, songs, dances and humorous disguise. An Encyclopaedia of British Women Writers (1998) points out that

Forced or unhappy marriages appear frequently and prominently in the comedies. Pix is not, however, writing polemics against the forced marriage but using it as a plot device and sentimentalizing the unhappily married person, who is sometimes rescued and married more satisfactorily.”(Schlueter & Schlueter, 1998: 513)

Although some contemporary women writers, like Aphra Behn, have been rediscovered, even the most specialised scholars have little knowledge of works by writers such as Catherine Trotter, Delarivier Manley or Mary Pix, despite the fact that plays like The Beau Defeated (1700), present with a wider range of female characters than plays written by men at the time. Pix’s plays generally had eight or nine female roles, while plays by male writers only had two or three.[

A production of The Fantastic Follies of Mrs Rich (or The Beau Defeated) played as part of the 2018 season at the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Pix produced one novel and seven plays. There are four other plays that were published anonymously, that are generally attributed to her.

Melinda Finberg notes that “a frequent motif in all her works is sexual violence and female victimization” – be that rape or murder (in the tragedies) or forcible confinement or the threat of rape (in the comedies).

^ Kramer, Annette (June 1994). “Mary Pix’s Nebulous Relationship to Zelmane”. Notes and Queries. 41 (2): 186–187. doi:10.1093/nq/41-2-186

PIX, Mrs. MARY (1666–1720?), dramatist, born in 1666 at Nettlebed in Oxfordshire, was daughter of the Rev. Roger Griffith, vicar of that place. Her mother, whose maiden name was Lucy Berriman, claimed descent from the ‘very considerable family of the Wallis’s.’ In the dedication of ‘The Spanish Wives’ Mrs. Pix speaks of meeting Colonel Tipping ‘at Soundess,’ or Soundness. This house, which was close to Nettlebed, was the property of John Wallis, eldest son of the mathematician. Mary Griffith’s father died before 1684, and on 24 July in that year she married in London, at St. Saviour’s, Benetfink, George Pix (b. 1660), a merchant tailor of St. Augustine’s parish. His family was connected with Hawkhurst, Kent. By him she had one child, who was buried at Hawkhurst in 1690.

It was in 1696, in which year Colley Cibber, Mrs. Manley, Catharine Cockburn (Mrs. Trotter), and Lord Lansdowne also made their débuts, that Mrs. Pix first came into public notice. She produced at Dorset Garden, and then printed, a blank-verse tragedy of ‘Ibrahim, the Thirteenth Emperor of the Turks.’ When it was too late, she discovered that she should have written ‘Ibrahim the Twelfth.’ This play she dedicated to the Hon. Richard Minchall of Bourton, a neighbour of her country days. In the same year (1696) Mary Pix published a novel, ‘The Inhuman Cardinal,’ and a farce, ‘The Spanish Wives,’ which had enjoyed a very considerable success at Dorset Garden.

From this point she devoted herself to dramatic authorship with more activity than had been shown before her time by any woman except Mrs. Afra Behn [q. v.] In 1697 she produced at Little Lincoln’s Inn Fields, and then published, a comedy of ‘The Innocent Mistress.’ This play, which was very successful, shows the influence of Congreve upon the author, and is the most readable of her productions. The prologue and epilogue were written by Peter Anthony Motteux [q. v.] It was followed the next year by ‘The Deceiver Deceived,’ a comedy which failed, and which involved the poetess in a quarrel. She accused George Powell [q. v.], the actor, of having seen the manuscript of her play, and of having stolen from it in his ‘Imposture Defeated.’ On 8 Sept. 1698 an anonymous ‘Letter to Mr. Congreve’ was published in the interests of Powell, from which it would seem that Congreve had by this time taken Mary Pix under his protection, with Mrs. Trotter, and was to be seen ‘very gravely with his hat over his eyes … together with the two she-things called Poetesses’ (see GOSSE, Life of Congreve, pp. 123–5). Her next play was a tragedy of ‘Queen Catharine,’ brought out at Lincoln’s Inn, and published in 1698. Mrs. Trotter wrote the epilogue. In her own prologue Mary Pix pays a warm tribute to Shakespeare. ‘The False Friend’ followed, at the same house, in 1699; the title of this comedy was borrowed three years later by Vanbrugh.

Hitherto Mary Pix had been careful to put her name on her title-pages or dedications; but the comedy of ‘The Beau Defeated’—undated, but published in 1700—though anonymous, is certainly hers. In 1701 she produced a tragedy of ‘The Double Distress.’ Two more plays have been attributed to Mary Pix by Downes. One of these is ‘The Conquest of Spain,’ an adaptation from Rowley’s ‘All’s lost by Lust,’ which was brought out at the Queen’s theatre in the Haymarket, ran for six nights, and was printed anonymously in 1705 (DOWNE, Roscius Anglicanus, p. 48). Finally, the comedy of the ‘Adventures in Madrid’ was acted at the same house with Mrs. Bracegirdle in the cast, and printed anonymously and without date. It has been attributed by the historians of the drama to 1709; but a copy in the possession of the present writer has a manuscript note of date of publication ‘10 August 1706.’

Nearly all our personal impression of Mary Pix is obtained from a dramatic satire entitled ‘The Female Wits; or, the Triumvirate of Poets.’ This was acted at Drury Lane Theatre about 1697, but apparently not printed until 1704, after the death of the author, Mr. W. M. It was directed at the three women who had just come forward as competitors for dramatic honours—Mrs. Pix, Mrs. Manley, and Mrs. Trotter [see Cockburn, Catharine]. Mrs. Pix, who is described as ‘a fat Female Author, a good, sociable, well-natur’d Companion, that will not suffer Martyrdom rather than take off three Bumpers in a Hand,’ was travestied by Mrs. Powell under the name of ‘Mrs. Wellfed.’

The style of Mrs. Pix confirms the statements of her contemporaries that though, as she says in the dedication of the ‘Spanish Wives,’ she had had an inclination to poetry from childhood, she was without learning of any sort. She is described as ‘foolish and open-hearted,’ and as being ‘big enough to be the Mother of the Muses.’ Her fatness and her love of good wine were matters of notoriety. Her comedies, though coarse, are far more decent than those of Mrs. Behn, and her comic bustle of dialogue is sometimes entertaining. Her tragedies are intolerable. She had not the most superficial idea of the way in which blank verse should be written, pompous prose, broken irregularly into lengths, being her ideal of versification.

The writings of Mary Pix were not collected in her own age, nor have they been reprinted since. Several of them have become exceedingly rare. An anonymous tragedy, ‘The Czar of Muscovy,’ published in 1702, a week after her play of ‘The Double Distress,’ has found its way into lists of her writings, but there is no evidence identifying it with her in any way. She was, however, the author of ‘Violenta, or the Rewards of Virtue, turn’d from Bocacce into Verse,’ 1704.

[Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica, 2nd ser. v. 110–3; Vicar-General’s Marriage Licences (Harl. Soc.), 1679–87, p. 173; Baker’s Biogr. Dramatica; Doran’s Annals of the English Stage, i. 243; Mrs. Pix’s works; Genest’s Hist. Account of the Stage.].

)§(§)§(

8) 331j.#781  Polwheile, Theolophilus

Aὐθέντης, Authentēs. Or A treatise of self-deniall. Wherein the necessity and excellency of it is demonstrated; with several directions for the practice of it. By Theophilus Polwheile, M.A. sometimes of Emmanuel Colledge in Cambridge, now teacher of the Church at Teverton in Devon

London: :printed for Thomas Johnson, and are to be sold by Richard Scott book-seller in Carlisle, 1658.

IMG_4622
IMG_4628

First Edition ¶. bound in mid 19th century brown calf, (48) 424 (46) pp. including 8 pp. publisher’s catalog, errata leaf at end, text clean, bright, collated complete, ownership signature of a B. Fuller in an old hand on bottom of title page, probably not that of Bishop William Fuller, but perhaps. Wing (2nd ed.), P2782; Thomason; E.1733[1]. NO US Copy. #331j. Item #781

In 1651 he took the degree of M.A. He was preacher at Carlisle until about 1655 (Dedication to Treatise on Self-deniall). In 1654 he was a member of the committee for ejecting scandalous ministers in the four northern counties of Cumberland, Durham, Northumberland, and Westmoreland. From that year until 1660, when he was driven from the living, he held the rectory of the portions of Clare and Tidcombe at Tiverton. The statement of the Rev. John Walker, in ‘The Sufferings of the Clergy,’ that he allowed the parsonage-house to fall into ruins, is confuted in Calamy’s ‘Continuation of Baxter’s Life and Times’ (i. 260–1). Polwhele sympathised with the religious views of the independents, and after the Restoration he was often in trouble for his religious opinions. After the declaration of James II the Steps meeting-house was built at Tiverton for the members of the independent body; he was appointed its first minister, and, on account of his age, Samuel Bartlett was appointed his assistant. He was buried in the churchyard of St. Peter, Tiverton, on 3 April 1689. His wife was a daughter of the Rev. William Benn of Dorchester. Their daughter married the Rev. Stephen Lobb

¶ Polwheile was a minister based mainly in Tiverton; the year after this was published, in the Restoration of 1660, he was ejected from his ministerial position for his religious views and for his sympathies with the Independents, who advocated for local control and for a certain freedom of religion for those who were not Catholic; because of this, he was often in trouble until the Declaration of Indulgence by James II in 1687, establishing freedom of religion in England (James II being Catholic). Polwheile died in 1689. Very Good.
(DNB).

Price: $1,800.00

IMG_4627

9) 736G Antoine Varillas 1624-1696

An’ekdota ‘Eterouiak’a. Or, The Secret History Of The House Of Medicis. Written Originally by that Fam’d Historian, the Sieur de Varillas. Made English by Ferrand Spence.

London: Printed by R.E. for R. Bentley and S. Magnes, in Russel-street in Covent Garden, 1686                                                       $1,100

 

Octavo 6 1/2 X 4 inches. A8 (lacking initial blank A1), a-d8, B-Z8, Aa-Gg8, Hh4 (lacking final blank Hh4a)

It is bound in 19th century quarter calf with an ornately gilt spine and would be a very pretty book on the shelf. It is bound in 19th century quarter calf with an ornately gilt spine and would be a very pretty book on the shelf.

¶In this fascinating Italian history the author makes use of all available sources to tell the legend of the house of Medici. The English translation is well executed and an interesting and enjoyable read. The following passage is quoted from the author’s preface. “If Procopius, the only Author from whom we have anekdota remaining to us, had left behind him the Rules of that kind of Writing, I should not lye under the Obligation of Penning a Preface, being the Authority of that excellent Historian, whom the French King’s Press has lately presented so Correct to the world, would be sufficient to screen me from all sorts of Reproaches, supposing I had observ’d them with exactness.” Ferrand Spence translated many works into English, but he did not write anything himself. He stands for the strong interest among English readers in the late seventeenth century for reading novels and histories in translation.

Wing V-111B; CH, CLC, NCU, TU, WF, Y.

)§(§)§(

End

This is a link to the rest of my books.

jamesgray2@me.com                  617*678*4517

Logo copy